Telephono

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Telephono
Telephono.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedApril 23, 1996
RecordedSpring 1995
Genre
Length34:59
LabelMatador
ProducerJohn Croslin
Spoon chronology
Nefarious
(1994)
Telephono
(1996)
Soft Effects
(1997)

Telephono is the debut studio album by the indie rock band Spoon. It was released on April 23, 1996, by Matador, then re-released in a two-disc package with the Soft Effects EP in 2006 by Merge Records.

"Idiot Driver" had previously appeared in an "alternate mix" form on the Peek-A-Boo Records November 1995 compilation album Bicycle Rodeo.

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3.5/5 stars[1]
Pitchfork Media7.5/10[2]
Rolling Stone2/5 stars[3]
Tom Hull – on the WebA–[4]

The album was produced by John Croslin, who had been one of the leaders of Austin's The Reivers, recording in Croslin's garage studio on a budget of $3,000.[5] It drew mainly positive critical attention, and in particular many comparisons to the Pixies.[6][7][8] The album sold only a few thousand copies, however.[5]

Track listing[edit]

All tracks are written by Britt Daniel except where noted.

No.TitleLength
1."Don't Buy the Realistic"3:54
2."Not Turning Off"3:08
3."All the Negatives Have Been Destroyed"2:37
4."Cvantez"2:45
5."Nefarious"2:47
6."Claws Tracking" (Daniel, Andy Maguire)2:32
7."Dismember"1:45
8."Idiot Driver"1:39
9."Towner" (aMiniature)3:05
10."Wanted to Be Your"1:52
11."Theme to Wendel Stivers"1:58
12."Primary"1:10
13."The Government Darling"2:23
14."Plastic Mylar"3:27
Total length:34:59

Personnel[edit]

Charts[edit]

Chart (2006) Peak
position
Billboard Top Independent Albums 35

References[edit]

  1. ^ Telephono at AllMusic
  2. ^ Pitchfork review
  3. ^ Rolling Stone review
  4. ^ Hull, Tom (March 29, 2021). "Music Week". Tom Hull – on the Web. Retrieved April 17, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b Raoul Hernandez, "Drake Tungsten and His Boy Skellington", Austin Chronicle, January 22, 1999.
  6. ^ Brad Jones, "Spoon Tunes", Westword, April 25, 1996.
  7. ^ Perry Gettelman, "The Word Has Gotten Around About Spoon", Orlando Sentinel, June 7, 1996.
  8. ^ Shannon Zimmerman, "Lone Stars", Washington City Paper, February 16, 2001.