Tellurite (ion)

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Tellurite (ion)
Skeletal formula of tellurite
Names
Systematic IUPAC name
Tellurite[1] (substitutive)
Trioxidotellurate(2−)[2] (additive)
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
100741
Properties
O3Te2−
Molar mass 175.6 g mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

The tellurite ion is TeO2−
3
. A tellurite (compound), for example sodium tellurite, is a compound that contains this ion. Tellurites are highly stable tellurium compounds, although they can be reduced to elemental tellurium by electrolysis or a strong reducing agent.

Acidified forms[edit]

In slightly acidic conditions, hydrogen tellurite ion, HTeO
3
, is prevalent; with more acidic conditions tellurous acid, H2TeO3, is prevalent. Only in basic conditions is tellurite formed.

Preparation[edit]

Most tellurite compounds can be formed by heating the relevant oxide with tellurium dioxide, e.g., Na2O + TeO2 → Na2TeO3.

Uses[edit]

Potassium tellurite (K2TeO3) is used together with agar as part of a selective medium for growth of some bacteria (Clauberg medium). Corynebacteria and some other species reduce TeO2−
3
to elemental Te, which stains the bacteria black.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tellurous Acid - PubChem Public Chemical Database". The PubChem Project. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 
  2. ^ "Tellurite (CHEBI:30477)". Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI). UK: European Bioinformatics Institute.