Template:Principal fatty acids of common cooking oils

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Oils and fats Saturated fatty acids MUFA PUFA
4:0 6:0 8:0 10:0 12:0 14:0 16:0 18:0 20:0 22:0 24:0 16:1 18:1 20:1 22:1 18:2 18:3
 
Almond[1] 6.5 1.7 0.6 69.4 17.4
Almond[2] 1 5 77 17
Apricot kernel[1] 5.8 0.5 1.5 58.5 29.3
Avocado[1] 10.9 0.7 2.7 67.9 12.5 1
Basil[3] 8.5 11 24.5 54.5
Brazil nut[4] 0.1 13.5 11.8 0.5 0.3 29.1 0.2 42.8 0.2
Butter[5] 5.3 2.8 1.6 3.1 3.4 10.8 28.1 10.6 1.4 20.8 0.3 2
Butter, anhydrous[1] 3.2 1.9 1.1 2.5 2.8 10 26.2 12.1 2.2 25 2.2 1.4
Canola[1] 4.3 2.1 0.7 0.3 0.2 61.7 1.3 19 9.1
Canola[6] 3.9 1.9 0.6 0.2 0.2 0.2 64.1 1 18.7 9.2
Cashew[3] 11.5 9 61 17
Cocoa butter[1] 0.1 25.4 33.2 0.2 32.6 2.8 0.1
Coconut[7] 0.4 7.3 6.6 47.8 18.1 8.9 2.7 0.1 6.4 1.6
Corn[1] 10.6 1.8 0.4 0.1 27.3 0.1 53.5 1.2
Cottonseed[8] 0.9 25.5 2.5 0.3 0.2 0.6 17.7 52.2 0.1
Grapeseed[1] 0.1 6.7 2.7 0.3 15.8 69.6 0.1
Hazelnut[4] 0.1 5.8 2.7 0.2 0.3 79.3 0.2 10.4 0.5
Hemp[3] 6.5 3 11.5 56.5 20
Lard[9] 0.1 0.2 1.4 24.9 14.1 2.8 43.1 10.7 1
Macadamia nut[4] 1 8.4 3.2 2.3 17.3 65.1 2.2 2.3 0.1
Olive[1] 11.3 2 0.4 0.1 1.3 71.3 0.3 9.8 0.8
Olive, Virgin[10] 13.8 2.8 0.1 1.9 69 12.2
Palm kernel[11] 0.3 3.6 3.3 48 16.7 8.5 2.1 14.9 2.5
Palm[12] 0.3 1.1 43.5 4.3 0.2 0.2 39.8 10.2 0.3
Palm[1] 0.1 1 43.5 4.3 0.3 36.6 0.1 9.1 0.2
Peanut[6] 0.1 11.6 3.1 1.5 3 1 0.2 46.5 1.4 31.4
Rapeseed[10] 4.8 1.9 60.5 22.5 9.5
Rice bran[13] 0.4 19.8 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.2 42.3 0.5 31.9 1.2
Safflower, high oleic[1] 0.1 4.9 1.9 0.4 0.3 0.1 74.8 0.3 12.7 0.1
Safflower[14] 7.3 2.5 13.6 75.7 0.5
Sesame[15] 0.1 9.2 5.8 0.7 0.2 0.1 40.6 0.2 42.6 0.3
Soybean[1] 10.5 4.4 0.4 0.4 22.6 0.2 51 6.8
Soybean[6] 0.1 11 4 0.3 0.1 0.1 23.4 53.2 7.8
Soybean, low linolenic[8] 10.8 4.5 0.4 0.4 26.1 55.4 2
Soybean, high oleic[note 1] 7.3 3.4 0.4 0.4 85.1 1.3 2
Sunflower[6] 0.5 0.2 6.8 4.7 0.4 0.1 18.6 68.2 0.5
Sunflower, high linoleic[1] 5.9 4.5 19.5 65.7
Sunflower, linoleic[1] 5.4 3.5 0.2 45.3 39.8 0.2
Sunflower, mid-oleic[1] 0.1 4.2 3.6 0.3 0.8 0.1 57 0.2 28.9
Sunflower, high oleic[1] 0.1 3.7 4.3 1 0.1 82.6 1 3.6 0.2
Sunflower, high oleic I[16] 5 3 82 9
Sunflower, high oleic II[16] 5 4 90 1
Tallow, beef[1] 0.9 3.7 24.9 18.9 4.2 36 0.3 3.1 0.6
Tallow, mutton[1] 3.8 21.5 19.5 2.3 37.6 5.5 2.3
Walnut[4] 0.1 6.7 2.3 0.1 0.2 21 0.2 57.5 11.6
[17] Parts per hundred
  1. ^ Warner and Gupta reported fishy and stale flavors in potato chips fried in this oil and attributed them to the unusual linoleic:linolenic acids ratio.[8]
  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Release 28". USDA.
  2. ^ R.S. Guad; S.J. Surana; G.S. Talele; S.G. Talele; S.B. Gokhale (2006). Natural Excipients. Pragati Books Pvt. Ltd. ISBN 978-81-85790-60-2.
  3. ^ a b c The Lipid Handbook (2007), pp. 71-73.
  4. ^ a b c d Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 329.
  5. ^ The Lipid Handbook (2007), pp. 93.
  6. ^ a b c d Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 61.
  7. ^ Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 172.
  8. ^ a b c Warner, K.; Gupta, M. (2005). "Potato chip quality and frying oil stability of high oleic acid soybean oil". Journal of food science. 70 (6).
  9. ^ The Lipid Handbook (2007), pp. 98.
  10. ^ a b Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 141.
  11. ^ Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 180.
  12. ^ Sundram, K; Sambanthamurthi, R; Tan, YA (2003). "Palm fruit chemistry and nutrition" (PDF). Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition. 12 (3): 355–62. PMID 14506001.
  13. ^ Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 303.
  14. ^ Takeuchi, H.; Matsuo, T.; Tokuyama, K.; Shimomura, Y.; Suzuki, M. "Diet-induced thermogenesis is lower in rats fed a lard diet than in those fed a high oleic acid safflower oil diet, a safflower oil diet or a linseed oil diet" (PDF). The Journal of nutrition. 125 (4): 920.
  15. ^ Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 293.
  16. ^ a b Vegetable Oils in Food Technology (2011), p. 148.
  17. ^ "Fats and fatty acids".