Template talk:Beer styles

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WikiProject Beer (Rated Template-class)
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I saw in one of the edit summaries that someone objected to the whole classification by country (incidentally, I just put Imperial stout in "other" because I didn't know where it belonged, heh). I'm also not sure about the current classification by country, so should we perhaps try to think of another way to organize this template? --Daniel11 00:11, 29 April 2007 (UTC)

Beer types diagram

Actually, just to add to my own comment, it looks like this chart would form a decent basis for such a reclassification. Further insipriation can also be found in the main article beer style. --Daniel11 00:34, 29 April 2007 (UTC)

I agree, aswell, on reclassification. More specifically, classification based on ingredients and manufacturing processes instead of country of origin. Country of origin can be attributed by different colors or additional symbols i.e. flag. How many other Wikipedia categories can be optimized by color classification/symbol enhancement? —Preceding unsigned comment added by Eca84 (talkcontribs) 05:35, 24 July 2008 (UTC)

Personally, I'd consider Baltic Porter (and Imperial Stout) to be British styles, although they were originally intended for export (as was India Pale Ale). Certainly, these 3 seem to have a fairly similar history and should be classified in the same way. —Preceding unsigned comment added by (talk) 21:24, 23 October 2008 (UTC)

I'd agree that the classification by country makes little sense. Beers of all types are made and sold all over the world these days. Recategorizing by ales v. lagers v. misc. would be good as long as it doesn't lead to endless disputes about what belongs in which category.
I whipped up a quick sample below. The "By Country" section may wind up being unwieldy though: Kuguar03 (talk) 20:59, 1 December 2010 (UTC)


I disagree with reclassification on the grounds of the concept of terroir, firstly that the waters of a different region (and other local products) will effect the flavour of the final product. As far as I know, there are no Dortmunder Exports made from outside of Dortmund, assuming due to the lack of Dortmund's every so slightly sulfury water. This is just one example of how the local region, let alone brewing traditions, create a unique product that cannot be precicely replicated in a different location. Another example could have been lambics, brewed with wild yeasts that simply are not found wild in other countries with different climates. This, of couse, does not hold true for every beer style, but even then the brewing traditions of the local country (or to be even more specific the brewing traditions of the local region) still play a role even when the style is successfully replicated elsewhere. For example, though both Belgium and Germany both brew beers from wheat, German beers would never be flavoured with citrus peel, due to the Reinheitgebot outlawing such additives, whereas Belgian brewing traditions encourage the addition of fuit, sugar and additives which would be illegal in German beers.

(on a different topic, perhaps the term British beer should be changed to English beer since this would exclude Schotch Ale, or that Scotch Ale should be added to British beer, because Scotland is British (as in, on the island of Great Britain). I would say the latter is preferable, since there are a number of styles in the catagory that, while made in England, are also made thoughout the British Ilse.) — Preceding unsigned comment added by (talkcontribs) 03:04, 24 August 2008‎