Temple Oheb Shalom (Baltimore, Maryland)

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Temple Oheb Shalom (Hebrew; Lovers of Peace) is a Reform synagogue in Baltimore, Maryland. The highest point in the city is located in its parking lot.

History[edit]

The congregation was founded in 1853 by Jewish immigrants from German Confederation member states; pioneer Reform rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise had considerable influence in the congregation's establishment.[1] Its first home was on Hanover Street near Camden Yards.[2]

In 1892 the congregation built the Eutaw Place Temple, designed by architect Joseph Evans Sperry who modeled it after the Great Synagogue of Florence in the fashionable Moorish Revival style.[2] The congregation sold the building to the Prince Hall Masons in 1961.[3]

In 1953 the congregation acquired land in Pikesville, and finished construction on its present building on Park Heights Avenue, designed by Sheldon I. Leavitt with consulting architect Walter Gropius in 1960.[2][4] The design is dominated by four large vaults and Gropius saw the design as a modern combination of "the turbine with the Torah."[5] Gropius' design also had an atypical design, with the sanctuary floor ascending toward the bimah on the eastern wall; this design was later reversed so that the floor descends toward the bimah on the western wall.[6]

Benjamin Szold was rabbi from 1859 to 1892, his daughter Henrietta Szold was the founder of Hadassah.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kerry M. Olitzky, The American Synagogue: A Historical Dictionary and Sourcebook (Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996), ISBN 978-0313288562, pp. 165–167. Excerpts available at Google Books.
  2. ^ a b c d "History" Temple Oheb Shalom.
  3. ^ Earl Arnett; Robert J. Brugger; Edward C. Papenfuse (1999). Maryland: A New Guide to the Old Line State (2nd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 338. ISBN 978-0801859809. 
  4. ^ Dorsey, John; Dilts, James D. (1981). A Guide to Baltimore Architecture (Second ed.). Tidewater Publishers. ISBN 0-87033-272-4. 
  5. ^ Frank R. Shivers, Jr.; Mary Ellen Hayward, eds. (2004). The Architecture of Baltimore: An Illustrated History. Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 296. ISBN 978-0801878060. 
  6. ^ Susan G. Solomon, Louis I. Kahn's Jewish Architecture: Mikveh Israel and the Midcentury American Synagogue (UPNE, 2009), ISBN 978-1584657880, p. 144. Excerpts available at Google Books.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°22′11″N 76°42′34″W / 39.36969°N 76.70955°W / 39.36969; -76.70955