Temple University Hospital

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Temple University Hospital
Temple University Health System
Geography
Location 3401 North Broad St,
Philadelphia, PA, United States
Coordinates 40°00′19″N 75°09′03″W / 40.00528°N 75.15083°W / 40.00528; -75.15083Coordinates: 40°00′19″N 75°09′03″W / 40.00528°N 75.15083°W / 40.00528; -75.15083
Organization
Care system Private
Funding Non-profit hospital
Hospital type Teaching
Affiliated university Temple University School of Medicine
Network Temple University Health System
Services
Emergency department Level I trauma center
Beds 722
Helipads
Helipad FAA LID: PA62[1]
Number Length Surface
ft m
H1 46 14 Roof/top
History
Founded 1892
Links
Website tuh.templehealth.org
Lists Hospitals in the United States

Temple University Hospital (TUH) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is an academic medical center in the United States. It is the chief clinical training site for the Temple University School of Medicine. The hospital currently has a 722-bed capacity that offers comprehensive inpatient and outpatient services to the surrounding community, and highly specialized tertiary services in the Delaware Valley.[2] In 2015, Temple University Hospital had more than 84,000 emergency department[3] and 200,000 outpatient visits.

In August 2011, Becker's Hospital Review listed Temple University Hospital as number 10 on the 100 Top Grossing Hospitals in America with $5.9 billion in gross revenue.[4]

History[edit]

It was originally the Samaritan Hospital which was founded by Russell Conwell on January 18, 1892 through the purchase of a three-story house at the intersection of Broad and Ontario St. The original hospital had twenty beds and only two full-time staff members. The hospital expanded with the addition of the Greathart Hospital as a maternity hospital and further facilities in the next decade after its founding. Samaritan Hospital was renamed to Temple University Hospital in 1929.[5][6]

William Parkinson, who was appointed as the director of the hospital and Dean of School of Medicine in February 1929, oversaw its renovation and expansion to a 500-bed capacity by 1940.[7] Development progressed in 1950s with the leadership of William Parkinson as three new buildings were added to accommodate the increasing number of individuals served by the hospital. A new ancillary and outpatient building were added along with Parkinson Pavilion, which added 600 inpatient beds. Further development came in December 1982 when a replacement hospital was approved on Broad and Ontario to replace the main hospital building with a 504-bed facility. The new nine-story hospital opened in 1986 with an expanded emergency department, while the Parkinson Pavilion was renovated to an outpatient facility.[8]

Temple University Health System[edit]

Until 1994, Temple University and Temple University Hospital were one entity. Peter J. Liacouras, the president of Temple University at that time, and the board of trustees separated hospital-related activities with the creation of university-owned subsidiary, Temple University Health System (TUHS).

Affiliated hospitals that make up the health system are Fox Chase Cancer Center, Jeanes Hospital since 1996, and the Episcopal Campus of Temple University Hospital since 1997 primarily providing behavioral health services. Northeastern Hospital became part of the health system in January 1995, but has since faced severe cuts to the services it provided. In July 2009, the hospital was converted to provide only ambulatory services.[9] Temple University Children's Medical Center was built after the formation of the health system in 1994 consisting of 70 beds. The Children's Medical Center shut its doors in 2007 as it faced declining number of patients.[10] TUHS also operates Temple Physicians which serves as a network of physician practices across the Greater Philadelphia Area established since 1996.[11]

Specialties[edit]

Temple University Hospital has a number of specialties including Abdominal Organ Transplant Program, Bariatric Surgery Program, Bone Marrow transplant Program, Cancer Center, Digestive Disease Center, Heart and Vascular Institute, Lung Center, Neurosciences Center and Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine.[12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "AirNav: PA62 - Temple University Heliport". Retrieved 8 July 2017. 
  2. ^ About Temple University Hospital Temple University Hospital. Retrieved 2011-02-04.
  3. ^ Facts and Figures Temple Health. Retrieved 2017-05-06
  4. ^ 100 Top Grossing Hospitals in America Becker's Hospital Review. Retrieved 2017-05-06
  5. ^ "Mission & History". Temple University Hospital. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  6. ^ Hilty, James W. (2010). Temple University: 125 years of Service to Philadelphia, the nation, and the world. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Temple University Press. p. 25. ISBN 1-4399-0019-1. 
  7. ^ Hilty, James W. (2010). Temple University: 125 years of Service to Philadelphia, the nation, and the world. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Temple University Press. p. 32. ISBN 1-4399-0019-1. 
  8. ^ Hilty, James W. (2010). Temple University: 125 years of Service to Philadelphia, the nation, and the world. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Temple University Press. p. 244. ISBN 1-4399-0019-1. 
  9. ^ "Northeastern Hospital to Close". WCAU. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  10. ^ Hilty, James W. (2010). Temple University: 125 years of Service to Philadelphia, the nation, and the world. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Temple University Press. p. 246. ISBN 1-4399-0019-1. 
  11. ^ "About Us". Temple Health. Retrieved May 6, 2017. 
  12. ^ Temple University Hospital Temple University Hospital. Retrieved 2017-05-06

External links[edit]