Temple of the Sun (Rome)

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The Temple of the Sun was a temple in the Campus Agrippae in Rome. It was dedicated to Sol Invictus on December 25, 274,[1] by the emperor Aurelian[2] and funded by spoils from his campaign against Palmyra. It was the fourth temple dedicated to the god in Rome – the other three were in the Circus Maximus, on the Quirinal Hill and in Trastevere.[3] If still in use by the 4th-century, it would have been closed during the persecution of pagans in the late Roman Empire. [4]

It is believed that the temple was already in ruins by the sixth century, as eight of its porphyry columns were apparently sent to Constantinople at some point to be used in either the construction or the rebuilding of Hagia Sophia during the emperor Justinian's reign.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Manfred Clauss, Die römischen Kaiser - 55 historische Portraits von Caesar bis Iustinian, ISBN 978-3-406-47288-6, p. 250
  2. ^ Aurelius Victor, De Caesaribus 35-7
  3. ^ Hijmans, Steven E (2009), Sol : the sun in the art and religions of Rome (Thesis/dissertation), ISBN 90-367-3931-4, chapter 5
  4. ^ R. MacMullen, "Christianizing The Roman Empire A.D.100-400, Yale University Press, 1984, ISBN 0-300-03642-6
  5. ^ Gregorovius, Ferdinand, History of the City of Rome in the Middle Ages, Vol. 1, (1894), pg. 38

Bibliography[edit]

  • L. Richardson, jr, A New Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome, Baltimore - London 1992. pp. 363–364 ISBN 0801843006
  • M. Clauss, Die römischen Kaiser - 55 historische Portraits von Caesar bis Iustinian, Munich 2010, pp. 241–251, ISBN 978-3-406-47288-6