Terao Tsunefumi

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Terao Tsunefumi
寺尾 常史
Terao 2011 Jan.JPG
Personal information
Born Yoshifumi Fukuzono
(1963-02-02) February 2, 1963 (age 54)
Tokyo, Japan
Height 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in)
Weight 117 kg (258 lb)
Career
Stable Izutsu
Record 860-938-58
Debut July, 1979
Highest rank Sekiwake (March, 1989)
Retired September, 2002
Championships 2 (Jūryō)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (3)
Fighting Spirit (3)
Technique (1)
Gold Stars 7
Ōnokuni (3)
Chiyonofuji
Hokutoumi
Takanohana II
Musashimaru
* Up to date as of August 2007.

Terao Tsunefumi (寺尾 常史?, born February 2, 1963 as Yoshifumi Fukuzono 福薗 好文) is a Japanese former sumo wrestler. He was born in Tokyo, but brought up in Kajiki, Aira District, Kagoshima, Japan. He fought out of Izutsu stable. The highest rank he reached was sekiwake. Despite his relatively light weight he had an extremely long career, spanning 23 years from 1979 until 2002, and was known as the "iron man" of sumo. He is now the head coach of Shikoroyama stable.

Sumo Family[edit]

Terao has a long sumo pedigree. He is the third son of former sekiwake Tsurugamine, and younger brother of Kakureizan (former jūryō) and Sakahoko (former sekiwake).[1] His paternal grandfather was a cousin of Satsumanishiki (former makushita). His father married the adopted daughter of former makushita Kaganishiki, who was adopted by Nishinoumi, the 25th yokozuna. His cousin is Tsurunofuji (former jūryō). Terao and his brothers Kakureizan and Sakahoko together hold various sumo records: they are the first three brothers ever to reach sekitori status; in September 1986 Terao and Sakahoko were the first brothers to win prizes together;[1] and in March 1989 they were the first brothers to hold sekiwake rank simultaneously.[1] In November 1990 they appeared together in Chiyonofuji's ring-entering ceremony as sword-bearer and dew-sweeper.

Career[edit]

Terao's tegata

He took up sumo shortly after his mother died of cancer.[2] He joined Izutsu stable, which was run by his father, alongside his two brothers. He started competing under the name Terao Setsuo (寺尾 節男) after his mother's maiden name Terao Setsuko (寺尾 節子).[2]

He first entered the second jūryō division in July 1984. To mark this promotion he changed his name to Genjiyama Rikisaburō, but reverted to Terao Setsuo after a single tournament. After winning the jūryō championship in January 1985 he entered the top makuuchi division, but won only 6 bouts out of 15 and so returned to jūryō. He won the jūryō division the next tournament and so reentered makuuchi in July 1985. In September 1986 he earned nine wins and his first special prize, for Fighting Spirit. This advanced him to his then highest rank, maegashira 1. He changed his name to Terao Tsunefumi in November 1987, on the advice of a fortune-teller.[2] In the following tournament in January 1988, he defeated yokozuna Onokuni to earn his first kinboshi. He defeated Chiyonofuji in the January 1989 tournament and won the Outstanding Performance Award. In the next basho in March 1989, he finally made his breakthrough into the titled san'yaku ranks at sekiwake after four years in the top division, joining his brother at sumo's third highest rank.

Although Terao fought several tournaments at sekiwake he never came close to ōzeki, his best performance as sekiwake being 9-6. His last appearance in san'yaku was at komusubi rank in July 1994. In March 1995 he upset Takanohana for the only time as a yokozuna, earning his last special prize. In November 1999, at the age of 35, he defeated Musashimaru for his final kinboshi. He remained in makuuchi until May 2000 when he was finally demoted at age 37 after 90 consecutive top division tournaments. However, he managed to return to makuuchi for two tournaments in March and May 2001, becoming at 38 years and 24 days the oldest man post World War II to earn promotion to the top division. His last tournament was in September 2002, where he scored only five wins at the rank of jūryō 11 and faced certain demotion to the makushita division.

Records[edit]

Despite suffering from a heart condition,[2] Terao enjoyed an exceptionally long and relatively injury-free career from his debut in 1979 aged 16 to his retirement in 2002 aged 39. He was referred to as the Tetsujin, or Iron Man, of sumo.[1] Among his other nicknames were "The Eternal Typhoon," because of both his longevity and his tsuppari fighting style.

His total number of bouts is 1795, the third highest ever, his total number of makuuchi bouts (1378) is the fourth highest ever. His 860 wins are the ninth highest ever; his 938 losses were the most ever recorded until Kyokutenhō finished his career with 944 losses in 2015. When he had to sit out 1 day of the March 1997 tournament and the whole May 1997 tournament after breaking his big toe in a bout against Kyokushūzan it ended a run of 1359 bouts without absence, the sixth highest ever. 1063 of these were in makuuchi, the fourth highest ever. His 110 tournaments ranked as a sekitori (in the top two divisions) was an all-time record until it was broken by Kaiō in 2010.

Fighting style[edit]

Terao was an oshi-sumo specialist, relying on pushing and thrusting techniques, keeping his opponent away from his mawashi. Throughout his career he consistently weighed around 115 kg, a considerable disadvantage in an era when most of his opponents were over 150 kg. He compensated by relying on his speed and agility, and was often able to use his quick reactions to outwit his heavier opponents. He was well known for his rapid series of thrusts to the chest (tsuppari), enabling him to win many of his matches by hataki-komi (the slap down), oshi-dashi (the push out) and tsuki-dashi (the thrust out).[3] Due to his light weight he was vulnerable to defeat by yori-kiri (force out) if his opponents managed to contain him.

After retirement[edit]

He is now a toshiyori (a sumo elder) known as Shikoroyama Oyakata. In February 2004 he established Shikoroyama stable.[4] He decided not to take any rikishi from Izutsu stable with him, recruiting all the new stable's rikishi himself. In January 2006 Hōmashō became his first rikishi to reach sekitori status. Hōmashō retired in January 2015, but later in that same year Seirō became the second wrestler coached by Shikoroyama to reach the top division.

Career record[edit]

Terao Tsunefumi[5]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1979 x x x (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #34
6–1
 
West Jonidan #80
6–1
 
1980 East Jonidan #19
2–5
 
West Jonidan #42
6–1
 
East Sandanme #77
2–5
 
West Jonidan #7
3–4
 
East Jonidan #21
5–2
 
East Sandanme #68
3–4
 
1981 West Sandanme #79
4–3
 
West Sandanme #58
3–4
 
West Sandanme #69
6–1
 
East Sandanme #20
4–3
 
East Sandanme #8
4–3
 
West Makushita #55
2–5
 
1982 West Sandanme #14
6–1
 
West Makushita #37
5–2
 
West Makushita #19
4–3
 
West Makushita #16
4–3
 
East Makushita #12
3–4
 
West Makushita #18
4–3
 
1983 East Makushita #11
3–4
 
East Makushita #20
3–4
 
West Makushita #34
4–3
 
East Makushita #23
3–4
 
East Makushita #31
4–3
 
West Makushita #22
5–2
 
1984 West Makushita #10
5–2
 
West Makushita #4
5–2
 
East Makushita #1
5–2
 
East Jūryō #10
7–8
 
West Jūryō #11
8–7
 
West Jūryō #8
8–7
 
1985 West Jūryō #7
12–3
Champion

 
West Maegashira #14
6–9
 
East Jūryō #3
12–3
Champion

 
West Maegashira #12
10–5
 
West Maegashira #2
6–9
 
West Maegashira #5
7–8
 
1986 East Maegashira #7
7–8
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
West Maegashira #4
4–11
 
East Maegashira #12
8–7
 
East Maegashira #8
9–6
F
East Maegashira #1
6–9
 
1987 West Maegashira #4
6–9
 
East Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #2
5–10
 
East Maegashira #5
7–8
 
East Maegashira #6
6–9
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
1988 East Maegashira #3
7–8
West Maegashira #3
6–9
 
West Maegashira #6
8–7
 
West Maegashira #1
6–9
 
West Maegashira #4
7–8
 
East Maegashira #6
8–7
 
1989 West Maegashira #1
8–7
O
West Sekiwake #1
5–10
 
East Maegashira #3
7–8
 
West Maegashira #3
10–5
T
West Sekiwake #1
8–7
F
West Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
1990 East Sekiwake #2
7–8
 
West Komusubi #1
8–7
 
East Sekiwake #1
7–8
 
West Komusubi #1
8–7
 
West Sekiwake #1
9–6
 
East Sekiwake #1
5–10
 
1991 East Maegashira #2
8–7
West Komusubi #1
8–7
 
East Komusubi #1
5–10
 
West Maegashira #3
6–9
 
East Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #4
6–9
1992 East Maegashira #8
8–7
 
West Maegashira #4
8–7
 
East Maegashira #2
2–13
 
East Maegashira #13
9–6
 
East Maegashira #8
9–6
 
East Maegashira #2
7–8
 
1993 East Maegashira #5
6–9
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #5
5–10
 
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #4
6–9
 
West Maegashira #6
7–8
 
1994 East Maegashira #8
8–7
 
West Maegashira #2
9–6
F
West Komusubi #1
8–7
O
West Komusubi #1
4–11
 
East Maegashira #3
4–11
 
West Maegashira #9
9–6
 
1995 West Maegashira #2
5–10
 
West Maegashira #6
8–7
O
East Maegashira #1
5–10
 
West Maegashira #5
5–10
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #3
5–10
 
1996 East Maegashira #7
6–9
 
East Maegashira #11
9–6
 
East Maegashira #3
5–10
 
West Maegashira #6
5–10
 
West Maegashira #10
9–6
 
East Maegashira #3
4–11
 
1997 West Maegashira #8
8–7
 
East Maegashira #3
2–12–1
 
East Maegashira #13
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Maegashira #13
9–6
 
West Maegashira #8
7–8
 
West Maegashira #9
6–9
 
1998 West Maegashira #13
9–6
 
East Maegashira #8
5–10
 
West Maegashira #12
9–6
 
East Maegashira #9
4–11
 
East Maegashira #16
9–6
 
West Maegashira #11
8–7
 
1999 East Maegashira #7
8–7
 
West Maegashira #3
5–10
 
West Maegashira #7
6–9
 
West Maegashira #11
8–7
 
West Maegashira #7
8–7
 
East Maegashira #4
5–10
2000 East Maegashira #7
5–10
 
East Maegashira #12
7–8
 
West Maegashira #13
5–10
 
West Jūryō #3
6–9
 
East Jūryō #6
8–7
 
East Jūryō #5
8–7
 
2001 West Jūryō #2
8–7
 
West Maegashira #12
8–7
 
East Maegashira #9
2–13
 
West Jūryō #3
9–6–P
 
West Jūryō #1
7–8
 
West Jūryō #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
2002 West Jūryō #2
5–10
 
West Jūryō #6
8–7
 
West Jūryō #2
2–3–10
 
East Jūryō #11
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
East Jūryō #11
Retired
5–8–2
x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Lewin, Brian (December 2005). "Brothers in sumo". sumofanmag.com. Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  2. ^ a b c d Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. ISBN 0-8348-0283-X. 
  3. ^ "Terao bouts by kimarite". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2009-09-09. 
  4. ^ "Shikoroyama - goo Sumo". Japan Sumo Association. Retrieved 2007-06-30. 
  5. ^ "Terao Tsunefumi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-08-16. 

External links[edit]