Teratosphaeriaceae

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Teratosphaeriaceae
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Ascomycota
Subdivision: Pezizomycotina
Class: Dothideomycetes
Subclass: Dothideomycetidae
Order: Capnodiales
Family: Teratosphaeriaceae
Genera

Teratosphaeriaceae is a family of fungi in the order Capnodiales.

History[edit]

In 2007, this family was recognized as distinct from the genus Mycosphaerella, where it had previously been located, based on phylogenies constructed with the Large Subunit (LSU) of ribosomal DNA.[1] In general, many fungi in the Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae are thought to be widespread, yet there is still little known about their individual distributions or the range of hosts that they inhabit.[2] After the family was formally split out from Mycosphaerella in 2007,[1] many new species have been described in this family including a number of causal agents in leaf diseases and stem cankers of Eucalyptus in Uruguay[2][3] and Australia.[4][5]

Habitat[edit]

This family of fungi is notable in that it contains a number of extremeotolerant, so-called black yeast fungi.[1] A number of these black yeast fungi in the Teratosphaeriaceae are considered 'rock-inhabiting', and manage to survive on the often-harsh exposed surfaces of rocks[6] in a range of extreme climates, including in Antarctica.[7] While some of the members of this family live in harsh environments, including the newly described genus Acidiella that grows in highly acidic soils (pH < 3) in Europe,[8] other closely related species are found as lichens or on plant surfaces.[9] This family, for example, contains a number of previously recognized leaf spot pathogens and endophytes.[10][11] Sequences from the plant pathogen Teratosphaeria microspora were even found in a high-throughput screen of fungal spores in indoor dust.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Crous, P. W.; U. Braun; Johannes Z. Groenewald (2007). "Mycosphaerella is polyphyletic.". Studies in Mycology. 58: 1–32. doi:10.3114/sim.2007.58.01. 
  2. ^ a b Pérez, C. A.; M. J. Wingfield; N. A. Altier; R. A. Blanchette (2009-10). "Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae associated with Eucalyptus leaf diseases and stem cankers in Uruguay". Forest Pathology. 39: 349–360. doi:10.1111/j.1439-0329.2009.00598.x.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  3. ^ Pérez, C. A.; M. J. Wingfield; N. Altier; R. A. Blanchette (2013-03-01). "Species of Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae on native Myrtaceae in Uruguay: evidence of fungal host jumps". Fungal Biology. 117: 94–102. doi:10.1016/j.funbio.2012.12.002. 
  4. ^ Crous, P. W.; B. A. Summerell; A. J. Carnegie; M. J. Wingfield; Johannes Z. Groenewald (2009-12-31). "Novel species of Mycosphaerellaceae and Teratosphaeriaceae". Persoonia - Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi. 23: 119–146. doi:10.3767/003158509X479531. 
  5. ^ Pérez, Guillermo; Bernard Slippers; Michael J. Wingfield; Brenda D. Wingfield; Angus J. Carnegie; Treena I. Burgess (2012-08-10). "Cryptic species, native populations and biological invasions by a eucalypt forest pathogen". Molecular Ecology. 21: 4452–4471. PMID 22882273. doi:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2012.05714.x. 
  6. ^ Ruibal, C.; G. Platas; G. F. Bills (2008-12-01). "High diversity and morphological convergence among melanised fungi from rock formations in the Central Mountain System of Spain". Persoonia - Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi. 21: 93–110. doi:10.3767/003158508X371379. 
  7. ^ Ruibal, C.; C. Gueidan; L. Selbmann; A. A. Gorbushina; P. W. Crous; Johannes Z. Groenewald; L. Muggia; M. Grube; D. Isola; C. L. Schoch; J. T. Staley; F. Lutzoni; G. S. de Hoog (2010-03-05). "Phylogeny of rock-inhabiting fungi related to Dothideomycetes". Studies in Mycology. 64: 123–133–S7. PMC 2816969Freely accessible. PMID 20169026. doi:10.3114/sim.2009.64.06. 
  8. ^ Hujslová, Martina; Alena Kubátová; Martin Kostovčík; Miroslav Kolařík (2012-10-07). "Acidiella bohemica gen. et sp. nov. and Acidomyces spp. (Teratosphaeriaceae), the indigenous inhabitants of extremely acidic soils in Europe". Fungal Diversity. 58: 33–45. doi:10.1007/s13225-012-0176-7. 
  9. ^ Gostinčar, Cene; Lucia Muggia; Martin Grube (2012). "Polyextremotolerant black fungi: oligotrophism, adaptive potential, and a link to lichen symbioses.". Frontiers in Microbiology. 3: 390. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2012.00390. 
  10. ^ Kemler, Martin; Jeff Garnas; Michael J. Wingfield; Marieka Gryzenhout; Kerry-Anne Pillay; Bernard Slippers (2013-12-16). "Ion Torrent PGM as Tool for Fungal Community Analysis: A Case Study of Endophytes in Eucalyptus grandis Reveals High Taxonomic Diversity". PLoS ONE. 8: –81718. PMC 3864840Freely accessible. PMID 24358124. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0081718. 
  11. ^ Crous, P. W.; Johannes Z. Groenewald (2011-07-30). "Why everlastings don't last". Persoonia - Molecular Phylogeny and Evolution of Fungi. 26: 70–84. doi:10.3767/003158511X574532. 
  12. ^ Adams, Rachel I.; Anthony S. Amend; John W. Taylor; Thomas D. Bruns (2013-07-24). "A Unique Signal Distorts the Perception of Species Richness and Composition in High-Throughput Sequencing Surveys of Microbial Communities: a Case Study of Fungi in Indoor Dust". Microbial Ecology. 66: 735–741. doi:10.1007/s00248-013-0266-4.