Terbium(IV) fluoride

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Terbium(IV) fluoride
Kristallstruktur Uran(IV)-fluorid.png
Names
Other names
terbium tetrafluoride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/4FH.Tb/h4*1H;/q;;;;+4/p-4
    Key: XWMJNWMCMQWTCG-UHFFFAOYSA-J
  • [F-].[F-].[Tb+4].[F-].[F-]
Properties
TbF4
Appearance white solid
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Terbium(IV) fluoride is an inorganic compound with a chemical formula TbF4. It is a white solid that is a strong oxidizer. It is also a strong fluorinating agent, emitting relatively pure atomic fluorine when heated, rather than the mixture of fluoride vapors emitted from cobalt(III) fluoride or cerium(IV) fluoride.[1] It can be produced by the reaction between very pure terbium(III) fluoride and xenon difluoride, chlorine trifluoride or fluorine gas:[2]

2 TbF3 + F2 → 2 TbF4

Properties[edit]

Terbium(IV) fluoride hydrolyzes quickly in hot water, producing terbium(III) fluoride and terbium oxyfluoride (TbOF). Heating terbium(IV) fluoride will cause it to decompose into terbium(III) fluoride and predominantly monatomic fluorine gas.[3][4]

TbF4 → TbF3 + F•↑

The reaction will produce the mixed valence compound Tb(TbF5)3, which has the same crystal form as Ln(HfF5)3.[5]

Terbium(IV) fluoride can oxidize cobalt trifluoride into cobalt tetrafluoride:[6]

TbF4 + CoF3 → TbF3 + CoF4

It can fluoronate [60]fullerene at 320–460 °C.[7]

When terbium(IV) fluoride reacts with potassium chloride and fluorine, it can produce the mixed valence compound KTb3F12.[8] A mixture of rubidium fluoride, aluminium fluoride and terbium(IV) fluoride produces Rb2AlTb3F16.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rau, J. V.; Chilingarov, N. S.; Leskiv, M. S.; Sukhoverkhov, V. F.; Rossi Albertini, V.; Sidorov, L. N. (August 2001). "Transition and rare earth metal fluorides as thermal sources of atomic and molecular fluorine". Le Journal de Physique IV. 11 (PR3): Pr3–109–Pr3-113. doi:10.1051/jp4:2001314.
  2. ^ 无机化学丛书 第七卷 钪 稀土元素. 科学出版社. pp 244-246. 1. 卤素化合物
  3. ^ "Thermal decomposition of curium tetrafluoride and terbium tetrafluoride". Journal of Solid State Chemistry. 73 (2): 524–530. 1988-04-01. doi:10.1016/0022-4596(88)90140-5. ISSN 0022-4596. Retrieved 2018-12-09.
  4. ^ Rau, J. V.; Chilingarov, N. S.; Leskiv, M. S.; Sukhoverkhov, V. F.; Rossi Albertini, V.; Sidorov, L. N. (August 2001). "Transition and rare earth metal fluorides as thermal sources of atomic and molecular fluorine". Le Journal de Physique IV. 11 (PR3): Pr3–109–Pr3-113. doi:10.1051/jp4:2001314.
  5. ^ Nikulin V V, Goryachenkov S A, Korobov M V, et al. On thermal stability of terbium tetrafluoride[J]. Zhurnal Neorganicheskoj Khimii, 1985, 30(10): 2530-2533.
  6. ^ "Atomic fluorine in thermal reactions involving solid TbF4". Journal of Fluorine Chemistry. 104 (2): 291–295. 2000-07-01. doi:10.1016/S0022-1139(00)00259-1. ISSN 0022-1139. Retrieved 2018-12-09.
  7. ^ O. V. Boltalina, A. Yu. Lukonin, V. K. Pavlovich, L. N. Sidorov, R. Taylor, A. K. Abdul-Sada (May 1998). "Reaction of [60]Fullerene with Terbium(IV) Fluoride". Fullerene Science and Technology. 6 (3): 469–479. doi:10.1080/10641229809350215. ISSN 1064-122X. Retrieved 2018-12-13.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  8. ^ "Synthesis and Crystal Structure of a New Mixed-Valence Terbium Fluoride, KTbIIITbIV2F12, and Related KLnIIIMIV2F12Compounds (MIV=Tb, Zr, Hf;LnIII=Ce–Lu)". Journal of Solid State Chemistry. 139 (2): 248–258. 1998-09-01. doi:10.1006/jssc.1998.7837. ISSN 0022-4596. Retrieved 2018-12-10.
  9. ^ "Synthesis and crystal structure of Rb2AlTb3F16: a new mixed-valence terbium fluoride". Solid State Sciences. 5 (8): 1141–1148. 2003-08-01. doi:10.1016/S1293-2558(03)00131-6. ISSN 1293-2558. Retrieved 2018-12-10.

attribution: This article was translated from the Chinese article zh:四氟化铽