Teresa, Contessa Guiccioli

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Teresa, Contessa Guiccioli
Teresa, Contessa Guiccioli.gif
Born 1800
Ravenna, Italy
Died 1873 (aged 72–73)
Education Saint Claire's Monastery at Faenza[1]
Partner(s) Lord Byron

Teresa, Contessa Guiccioli (1800–1873) was the married lover[2] of Lord Byron while he was living in Ravenna, Italy, and writing the first five cantos of Don Juan.[3] She wrote the biographical account Lord Byron's Life in Italy.[4]

On 19 January 1818, Teresa married Count Guiccioli. It was three days later, on 22 January, that she met Lord Byron at the home of Countess Albrizzi.[1]

Alexandre Dumas included her as a minor character in his novel The Count of Monte Cristo using the disguised name "Countess G-".[5] Lord Byron also used this shortened name in his journals.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Guiccioli, Teresa; Rees, Michael; Cochran, Peter (2005). "Lord Byron and Countess Guiccioli". In Cochran, Peter. Lord Byron's Life in Italy (Illustrated ed.). University of Delaware Press. pp. 124–23. ISBN 9780874137163. Retrieved 18 July 2015. 
  2. ^ "Disgrace". bookdrum.com. 
  3. ^ Susan J. Wolfson, Peter J. Manning (1996), Selected Poems By Lord George Gordon Byron, Penguin Classics, ISBN 978-0-14-042381-5, OCLC 35209118 
  4. ^ Teresa Guiccioli (2005), Lord Byron's Life in Italy, University of Delaware Press, ISBN 978-0-87413-716-3, OCLC 55729965 
  5. ^ Liljegren, S Bodvar (1945). Essence and attitude in English romanticism. Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksell. p. 191. OCLC 185958911. 
  6. ^ Moore, Thomas (1831). (The) Letters and Journals of Lord Byron: With Notices of His Life. J. Murray. pp. 314, et al. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Origo, Iris; Byron, George Gordon; Teresa Guiccioli, contessa di (2000). The last attachment: the story of Byron and Teresa Guiccioli as told in their unpublished letters and other family papers. New York: Books & Co./Helen Marx Books. ISBN 9781885586506. OCLC 43959105. 
  • Soderholm, James (January 1995). "Editing his body: Teresa Guiccioli's transubstantiation of Byron". Nineteenth-Century Contexts. 19 (2): 205–220. doi:10.1080/08905499508583422. ISSN 0890-5495. OCLC 4661462873. 

External links[edit]