Terrine (food)

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A basil salmon terrine

A terrine (French pronunciation: ​[tɛ.ʁin]), in traditional French cuisine, is a loaf of forcemeat or aspic, similar to a pâté, that is cooked in a covered pottery mold (also called a terrine) in a bain-marie.[1][2][3] Modern terrines do not necessarily contain meat or animal fat, but still contain meat-like textures and fat substitutes, such as mushrooms and pureed fruits or vegetables high in pectin.[4] They may also be cooked in a wide variety of non-pottery terrine molds, such as stainless steel, aluminum, enameled cast iron, and ovenproof plastic.

Terrines are usually served cold[5] or at room temperature. Most terrines contain a large amount of fat, although it is often not the main ingredient, and pork; and many terrines are made with typical game meat, such as pheasant and hare.[6] In the past, terrines were under the province of professional charcutieres, along with sausages, pâtés, galantines, and confit.[7]

Less commonly, a terrine may be another food cooked or served in the cooking dish called a 'terrine'.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trésor de la langue française, s.v.
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, s.v.
  3. ^ The Culinary Institute of America (CIA). (2012). Garde Manger: The Art and Craft of the Cold Kitchen, 4E (p. 678). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  4. ^ The Culinary Institute of America (CIA). (2012). Garde Manger: The Art and Craft of the Cold Kitchen, 4E (p. 300). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  5. ^ a b "Terrine". Dictionary.com. Retrieved March 21, 2017.
  6. ^ S. Beaty - Pownall (1902). The "Queen" Cookery Books No. 5 - Meats and Game. London: Horace Cox. pp. 225–229. Retrieved 16 August 2017.
  7. ^ The Culinary Institute of America (CIA). (2012). Garde Manger: The Art and Craft of the Cold Kitchen, 4E (p. xiii). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.