Terry Hughes (scientist)

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Distinguished Professor Terry Hughes FAA, ARC Laureate Fellow and Director of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University.

Terry Hughes (born 1956, in Dublin, Ireland) is a professor of marine biology at James Cook University in Queensland, Australia. He is well known for research on the global coral bleaching event caused by climate change. Nature dubbed him "Reef sentinel" in 2016 for the global role he plays in applying multi-disciplinary science to securing reef sustainability. He is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow and Director of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies.[1] His research interests encompass coral reef ecology, macroecology and evolution, as well as social-ecological interactions.[2] His recent work has focused on marine ecology, macroecology, climate change, identifying safe planetary boundaries for human development, and on transformative governance of the sea in Australia, Chile, China, the Galapagos Islands, Gulf of Maine and the Coral Triangle.[3] His career citations in Google Scholar exceed 57,000.[4]

Education and career[edit]

Hughes was awarded a PhD in Ecology and Evolution from The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA, in 1984,[5] for his groundbreaking research on coral life histories,[6] phase-shifts and the resilience of Caribbean coral reefs.[7] Following his PhD, he was an NSF Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Lecturer at the University of California, Santa Barbara (1984-1990) before moving to James Cook University in Townsville, Australia.[8] He was appointed Professor in 2000 and established the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies in 2005.[9] Hughes has published in excess of 140 peer reviewed publications, so far. His work receives extensive media coverage and he actively communicates his findings to a broader audience through popular articles,[10] radio and television.[11][12] Under the direction of Hughes, the ARC Centre has grown to become the world’s foremost authority on coral reef science and is a hub for world-leading research and graduate training. The ARC Centre produces greater than 350 publications annually and was recently awarded further funding until 2021.[13]

Awards[edit]

In 2001, Hughes was elected to the Fellowship of the Australian Academy of Science for his contribution to coral reef science.[14] He has been awarded the Centenary Medal of Australia for his services to Australian society and marine biology,[15] a Silver Jubilee Award for Excellence by the Australian Marine Science Association,[16] the Australian Museum Eureka Sherman Prize for Environmental Science,[17] and the prestigious Darwin Medal by the International Society for Reef Studies.[18] In 2014, he was awarded an Einstein Professorship by the Chinese Academy of Sciences.[19] Hughes was joint winner of the 2018 John Maddox Prize, awarded by Nature and Sense about Science.[20] In 2018, Hughes was also awarded the A.G. Huntsman Award for Excellence in the Marine Sciences and the Climate Change Award from the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation.

Selected bibliography[edit]

  • Catastrophes, phase-shifts, and large-scale degradation of a Caribbean coral reef. Hughes, T.P., Science (1994) 265:1547-1551.
  • Climate change, human impacts, and the resilience of coral reefs. Hughes, T.P., A.H. Baird, D.R. Bellwood, et al., Science (2003) 301:929-933.
  • Confronting the coral reef crisis. Bellwood, D.R., T.P. Hughes, C. Folke, and M. Nyström, Nature (2004) 429:827-833.
  • New paradigms for supporting the resilience of marine ecosystems. Hughes, T.P., D.R. Bellwood, C. Folke, et al., Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2005) 20:380-386.
  • Regime-shifts, herbivory and the resilience of coral reefs to climate change. Hughes, T.P., M.J. Rodrigues, D.R. Bellwood, et al., Current Biology (2007) 17:360-365.
  • Rising to the challenge of sustaining coral reef resilience. Hughes, T.P., N. Graham, J.B.C. Jackson, et al., Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2010) 25:633-642.
  • Living dangerously on borrowed time during unrecognized regime shifts. Hughes, T.P., C. Linares, V. Dakos, et al., Trends in Ecology and Evolution (2012) 28:149-155.
  • Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals. Hughes, T.P., and 43 co-authors. Nature (2017) 543: 373-377.
  • Global warming transforms coral reef ecosystems. Hughes, T.P. and 14 co-authors. Nature (2017) 556: 492 – 496.
  • Spatial and temporal patterns of mass bleaching of corals in the Anthropocene. Hughes T.P., and 24 co-authors. Science (2018) 359: 80 – 83.
  • Ecological memory modifies the cumulative impact of recurrent climate extremes. Hughes TP, and 12 co-authors. Nature Climate Change (2019) 9: 40-43.
  • Global warming impairs stock-recruitment dynamics of corals. Hughes T.P., and 17 co-authors. (2019). Nature 568, 387–390.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Australian Research Council "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 February 2014. Retrieved 21 July 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), accessed 21 July 2014.
  2. ^ ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies [1], accessed 21 July 2014.
  3. ^ James Cook University [2], accessed 21 July 2014.
  4. ^ Google Scholar [3], accessed 26 August 2015.
  5. ^ ARCCOE Curriculum Vitae "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 May 2013. Retrieved 21 July 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), accessed 21 July 2014.
  6. ^ Population dynamics and life histories of foliaceous corals [4], accessed 21 July 2014.
  7. ^ Catastrophes, phase shifts and large-scale degradation of a Caribbean coral reef [5], accessed 21 July 2014.
  8. ^ ARCCOE Curriculum Vitae "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 May 2013. Retrieved 21 July 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), accessed 21 July 2014.
  9. ^ ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies [6], accessed 21 July 2014.
  10. ^ The Conversation [7], accessed 21 July 2014.
  11. ^ ABC TV Future Forum: Can coral reefs survive the 21st century [8], accessed 21 July 2014.
  12. ^ ABC TV Catalyst: Future response of the Great Barrier Reef to climate change [9], accessed 21 July 2014.
  13. ^ ARCCOE Annual Report 2013 "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 20 May 2014. Retrieved 22 July 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link), accessed 21 July 2014.
  14. ^ Australian Academy of Science Fellowship List [10], accessed 21 July 2014.
  15. ^ Centenary Medal, www.itsanhonour.gov.au, accessed 21 July 2014.
  16. ^ AMSA Jubilee Awardees Archived 31 August 2014 at the Wayback Machine, www.amsa.asn.au, accessed 21 July 2014.
  17. ^ Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, australianmuseum.net.au, accessed 21 July 2014.
  18. ^ Darwin Medal Recipients, coralreefs.org, accessed 21 July 2014.
  19. ^ Einstein Professorship Program Archived 11 October 2013 at the Wayback Machine, Chinese Academy of Sciences, accessed 21 July 2014.
  20. ^ "Maddox Prize 2018 – Sense about Science". senseaboutscience.org. Retrieved 15 November 2018.