Tessa Morris-Suzuki

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Tessa Morris-Suzuki (born 29 October 1951 in England) is a historian of modern Japan and Korea. She is Professor in the School of Culture, History and Language, College of Asia and the Pacific, the Australian National University.[1] She is also a coordinator of an open access journal AsiaRights, and has served as president of the Asian Studies Association of Australia.[2] She was the winner of the Academic Prize of the Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize in 2013.[3]

Academic career[edit]

Tessa Morris-Suzuki was born in England and lived and worked in Japan before emigrating to Australia in 1981. Her research focuses on Japan's frontiers and minority communities and on questions of historical memory in East Asia. She is the author of Exodus to North Korea: Shadows from Japan's Cold War. Her two most recent books are To the Diamond Mountains: A Hundred Year Journey Through China and Korea, and Borderline Japan: Foreigners and Frontier Controls in the Post-war Era (both 2010).

Publications[edit]

  • Tennô to Amerika (The Emperor and America, coauthored), Shûeisha, 2010
  • Borderline Japan: Foreigners and Frontier Controls in the Postwar Era, Cambridge University Press, 2010
  • To the Diamond Mountains: A Hundred Year Journey Through China and Korea, Rowman and Littlefield, 2010
  • Beyond Computopia: Information, Automation and Democracy in Japan, Kegan Paul International, 1988.
  • The Technological Transformation of Japan, Cambridge University Press, 1994. (also published in Chinese and Korean translations)
  • Re-Inventing Japan: Time Space, Nation, M.E. Sharpe, 1998. (also published in Spanish translation)
  • Demokurashii no Bôken (Ventures in Democracy, co-authored), Shûeisha, 2004.
  • The Past Within Us: Media, Memory, History, Verso, 2005. (also published in Japanese translation)
  • Exodus to North Korea: Shadows from Japan's Cold War, Rowman and Littlefield, 2007.[4] (also published in Japanese translation)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Elections in Japan". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 26 August 2009. Retrieved 26 October 2011. 
  2. ^ "Giving culture a hearing". New Straits Times. 24 November 2002. Retrieved 26 October 2011. 
  3. ^ "Tessa MORRIS-SUZUKI". Retrieved 21 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Professor details Japanese deportations". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 22 February 2007. Retrieved 26 October 2011.