Tessa Ross

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Tessa Ross
Born Tessa Sarah Ross
1961
London, England
Alma mater Somerville College, Oxford
Occupation
Years active 1986–present

Tessa Sarah Ross CBE (born 1961) is a British film producer and executive. She was appointed Head of Film at Channel 4 in 2000 and ran Film4 and Film4 Productions from 2002 to 2014. Ross was appointed to the Board of the Royal National Theatre in 2011, and became Chief Executive in 2014. She resigned in April 2015, citing concerns over the new leadership structure, but remained working with the National Theatre as a consultant.[1] Ross received the BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema Award and was named as one of the 100 most powerful women in the United Kingdom by Woman's Hour in 2013.[2][3] She is an honorary fellow of the National Film and Television School.[4] In the 2010 New Year Honours, she was awarded the CBE for services to broadcasting.[5]

Ross has been the executive producer of a number of notable British films, including Billy Elliot (2000), The Last King of Scotland (2006), This Is England (2006), Happy-Go-Lucky (2008), Slumdog Millionaire (2008), Hunger (2008), Four Lions (2010), 127 Hours (2010), Shame (2011), 12 Years a Slave (2013), Under the Skin (2013), Ex Machina (2015), 45 Years (2015), Room (2015), and Carol (2015).

Early life[edit]

Ross was born in 1961 in London. The daughter of a lawyer and teacher, she attended Westminster School, and graduated from Somerville College, Oxford in 1980.[3] Ross read oriental studies and Chinese at Oxford and became interested in theatre. She was president of the dramatic society and directed many plays, later getting postgraduate theatre training.[6][7][8]

Career[edit]

After graduating from Oxford, Ross became a literary agent in 1986.[9][10] She then segued into television, commissioning work for Bill Bryden, who had worked at the Royal National Theatre and was the head of the BBC Scotland drama department. Ross also worked as a script editor.[9][7] Ross was married at the time and left when she became pregnant. She then returned to London, and in 1990 ran the National Film Development Fund, which later became British Screen.[9][11]

In 1993, Ross worked again at BBC. She ran the Independent Commissioning Group for Drama from 1993 to 2000, commissioning many film and television projects, including Billy Elliot and Clocking Off.[7][9][11] In 2000, Ross worked at Channel 4, where she became Head of Drama and was later appointed Head of Film.[7] Ross ran Film4 and Film4 Productions from 2002 to 2014.[5][10][12] She was appointed to the Board of the Royal National Theatre in 2011, and in 2014 appointed Chief Executive.[5][2] She resigned in April 2015, citing concerns over the new leadership structure, but remained working with the National Theatre as a consultant.[13]

Personal life[edit]

Ross resides in Camden, London. She is married to a marketing consultant, and has three children.[14][8]

Filmography[edit]

Films Ross has executive produced.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Brown, Mark (16 April 2015). "Tessa Ross resigns as National Theatre's chief executive". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Plunkett, John. "Channel 4 boss Tessa Ross appointed chief executive of the National Theatre". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  3. ^ a b "BBC Radio 4 − Woman's Hour − The Power list". BBC Online. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  4. ^ "Honorary Fellows". National Film and Television School. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c "Tessa Ross CBE". BBC Online. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  6. ^ "Tessa Ross to receive BAFTA Award for Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema". Somerville College, Oxford. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c d "Film4 people: Tessa Ross". Film4. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  8. ^ a b "Introucing Tessa Ross: the movie mogul powering British film". London Evening Standard. 4 October 2013. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d "Tessa Ross". Goldsmiths, University of London. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Gibson, Owen. "Interview: Tessa Ross". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  11. ^ a b "Tessa Ross, executive producer". Focus Features. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  12. ^ Pulver, Andrew (26 March 2014). "Tessa Ross leaves Film4 for National Theatre". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  13. ^ Brown, Mark (16 April 2015). "Tessa Ross resigns as National Theatre's chief executive". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 
  14. ^ "Tessa Ross Outstanding British Contribution To Cinema 2013". BAFTA. 28 January 2013. Retrieved 24 February 2016. 

External links[edit]