Testosterone undecanoate

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Testosterone undecanoate
Testosterone undecanoate.svg
Clinical data
Pronunciation tess-toss-ter-own un-deck-ah-no-ate
Pregnancy
category
Routes of
administration
Oral, intramuscular injection
ATC code
Legal status
Legal status
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability Oral: 3–7%
Intramuscular ~100%[citation needed]
Metabolism Liver, testis and prostate
Biological half-life 1–12 days[citation needed]
Excretion Urine
Identifiers
Synonyms Aveed, Andriol, Undestor, Nebido, Pantestone, Restandol, Cernos Depot, Nebido-R, Reandron 1000
17β-[(1-Oxoundecyl)oxy]-androst-4-en-3-one
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
KEGG
ChEMBL
ECHA InfoCard 100.025.193
Chemical and physical data
Formula C30H48O3
Molar mass 456.70032 g/mol
3D model (Jmol)
 NYesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Testosterone undecanoate (USAN, BAN) (brand names Aveed, Andriol, Androxon, Cernos Depot, Nebido, Panteston, Restandol, Nebido-R, Reandron 1000, Undestor), or testosterone undecylate, is an androgen and anabolic steroid and a testosterone ester.[1][2][3] It is used in androgen replacement therapy primarily for the treatment of male hypogonadism, and has also been investigated for use as a male contraceptive or as hormone replacement therapy in transgender men.[4][5] Unlike other testosterone esters, testosterone undecanoate is available in both oral and intramuscular formulations.[6] The Reandron 1000 formulation (Nebido in the United States) contains 1000 mg of testosterone undecanoate suspended in castor oil with benzyl benzoate for solubilisation and as a preservative, and is administered by intramuscular injection. As an excipient, benzyl benzoate has been reported as a cause of anaphylaxis in a case in Australia.[7] Bayer includes this report in information for health professionals and recommends that physicians "should be aware of the potential for serious allergic reactions" to preparations of this type.[8] In Australia, reports to ADRAC, which evaluates reports of adverse drug reactions for the Therapeutic Goods Administration, show several reports of allergic issues since the anaphylaxis case from 2011.

Testosterone undecanoate has a very long elimination half-life and mean residence time when given as a depot intramuscular injection.[9] The elimination half-life and mean residence time of testosterone undecanoate are 2.5-fold and 4-fold longer than those of testosterone enanthate (the values for testosterone enanthate being 4.5 days and 8.5 days, respectively).[9]

Aveed brand testosterone undecanoate was approved for use in the United States by the FDA in 2014, after three previous rejections due to safety concerns.[10] It is administered at a dosage of 1,000 mg every 12 weeks via intramuscular injection.[11] In addition to parenteral, an oral formulation of testosterone undecanoate (brand name Andriol) is also available in Europe, but must be taken two or three times a day in combination with food.[11][12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp. 641–642. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3. 
  2. ^ Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory. Taylor & Francis. January 2000. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1. 
  3. ^ I.K. Morton; Judith M. Hall (6 December 2012). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and Synonyms. Springer Science & Business Media. ISBN 978-94-011-4439-1. 
  4. ^ JW Jacobeit; LJ Gooren; HM Schulte (2007). "Long-acting intramuscular testosterone undecanoate for treatment of female-to-male transgender individuals.". The Journal of Sexual Medicine. 4 (5): 1479–84. doi:10.1111/j.1743-6109.2007.00556.x. PMID 17635694. 
  5. ^ JW Jacobeit; LJ Gooren; HM Schulte (2009). "Safety aspects of 36 months of administration of long-acting intramuscular testosterone undecanoate for treatment of female-to-male transgender individuals". European Journal of Endocrinology. 161 (5): 795–8. doi:10.1530/EJE-09-0412. PMID 19749027. 
  6. ^ Köhn, Frank-Michael; Schill, Wolf-Bernhard (November 2003). "A new oral testosterone undecanoate formulation". World Journal of Urology. 21 (5): 311–315. doi:10.1007/s00345-003-0372-x. PMID 14579074. 
  7. ^ Ong, G. S. Y.; Somerville, C. P.; Jones, T. W.; Walsh, J. P. (2012). "Anaphylaxis Triggered by Benzyl Benzoate in a Preparation of Depot Testosterone Undecanoate". Case Rep Med. 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/384054. PMC 3261473Freely accessible. PMID 22272209. 384054. 
  8. ^ "Nebido Monograph – Information for Health Care Professionals". Bayer. 2016. Retrieved 19 October 2016. 
  9. ^ a b Anita H. Payne; Matthew P. Hardy (28 October 2007). The Leydig Cell in Health and Disease. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 423–. ISBN 978-1-59745-453-7. 
  10. ^ Miriam E. Tucker (March 7, 2014). "FDA Approves Aveed Testosterone Jab, with Restrictions". Medscape. Retrieved December 13, 2016. 
  11. ^ a b S. Bertelloni; O. Hiort (28 September 2010). New Concepts for Human Disorders of Sexual Development. S. Karger AG. pp. 256–. ISBN 978-3-8055-9569-8. 
  12. ^ Jean L. Fourcroy (27 October 2008). Pharmacology, Doping and Sports: A Scientific Guide for Athletes, Coaches, Physicians, Scientists and Administrators. Routledge. pp. 25–. ISBN 978-1-134-08880-5. 

External links[edit]