Tetraethyltin

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Tetraethyltin
Tetraethyltin.svg
Tetraethyltin-3D-spacefill.png
Names
IUPAC name
Tetraethyltin
Other names
Tetraethyl tin
Identifiers
3D model (Jmol)
Abbreviations TET
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.009.007
EC Number 209-906-2
MeSH Tetraethyltin
UN number 3384
Properties
C8H20Sn
Molar mass 234.96 g·mol−1
Appearance Colourless liquid
Density 1.187 g cm−3
Melting point −112 °C (−170 °F; 161 K)
Boiling point 181 °C (358 °F; 454 K)
Hazards
Very Toxic T+Dangerous for the Environment (Nature) N
R-phrases R26/27/28 R50/53
S-phrases S26, S27, S28, S45, S60, S61
NFPA 704
Flammability code 2: Must be moderately heated or exposed to relatively high ambient temperature before ignition can occur. Flash point between 38 and 93 °C (100 and 200 °F). E.g., diesel fuel Health code 3: Short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury. E.g., chlorine gas Reactivity code 3: Capable of detonation or explosive decomposition but requires a strong initiating source, must be heated under confinement before initiation, reacts explosively with water, or will detonate if severely shocked. E.g., fluorine Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
Flash point 53 °C (127 °F; 326 K)
Related compounds
Related Tetraalkylstannanes
Tetrabutyltin

Tetramethyltin

Related compounds
Tetraethylgermanium

Tetraethyllead

Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Tetraethyltin or tetraethyl tin is a chemical compound with the formula C
8
H
20
Sn
and molecular structure (CH3CH2)4Sn, that is, a tin atom attached to four ethyl groups. It is an important example of an organotin compound, often abbreviated as TET.

Tetraethyltin is a colourless flammable liquid, soluble in diethyl ether and insoluble in water, that freezes at -112 °C and boils at 181 °C.[1][2] It is used in the electronics industry.

Tetraethyltin can be obtained by reacting ethylmagnesium bromide with tin(IV) chloride:[1]

SnCl4 + 4 (C2H5)MgBr → (CH3CH2)4Sn + 4 MgBrCl

The same reaction can be used to obtain tetra-n-propyltin and tetra-n-butyltin.[1]

Tetraethyltin is converted in the body to the more toxic triethyltin.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c G. J. M. Van Der Kerk and J. G. A. Luijten (1956), "Tetraethyltin". Organic Syntheses, volume 36, page 86; Coll. Vol. 4, p.881 (1963)
  2. ^ SAFC corp, tetraethyltin catalog page. Accessed on 2011-01-18.
  3. ^ Schmid, D. O.; Cwik, S. (1975). "R receptors on lymphocytes of sheep". Animal Blood Groups and Biochemical Genetics. 6 (1): 61–62. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2052.1975.tb01351.x. PMID 1200418.