Tewksbury Township, New Jersey

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Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Township of Tewksbury
Bartles House on Oldwick Road
Bartles House on Oldwick Road
Map of Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Tewksbury Township in Hunterdon County. Inset: Location of Hunterdon County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Tewksbury Township, New Jersey
Tewksbury Township is located in Hunterdon County, New Jersey
Tewksbury Township
Tewksbury Township
Location in Hunterdon County
Tewksbury Township is located in New Jersey
Tewksbury Township
Tewksbury Township
Location in New Jersey
Tewksbury Township is located in the United States
Tewksbury Township
Tewksbury Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°41′25″N 74°46′18″W / 40.690169°N 74.771685°W / 40.690169; -74.771685Coordinates: 40°41′25″N 74°46′18″W / 40.690169°N 74.771685°W / 40.690169; -74.771685[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Hunterdon
IncorporatedFebruary 21, 1798
Named forTewkesbury, England
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorPeter Melick (R, term ends December 31, 2020)[3][4]
 • AdministratorJames Barberio[5]
 • Municipal clerkJennifer Ader (acting)[5]
Area
 • Total31.78 sq mi (82.30 km2)
 • Land31.65 sq mi (81.96 km2)
 • Water0.13 sq mi (0.34 km2)  0.41%
Area rank79th of 565 in state
6th of 26 in county[1]
Elevation751 ft (229 m)
Population
 • Total5,993
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
5,776
 • Rank345th of 566 in state
5th of 26 in county[12]
 • Density190.1/sq mi (73.4/km2)
 • Density rank512th of 566 in state
20th of 26 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07830 - Califon,[13] 08833 - Lebanon[14]
Area code(s)908[15]
FIPS code3401972510[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0882190[1][18]
Websitewww.tewksburytwp.net

Tewksbury Township is a township located in Hunterdon County, New Jersey and is located within the New York Metropolitan Area.[3] As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 5,993,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 452 (+8.2%) from the 5,541 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 738 (+15.4%) from the 4,803 counted in the 1990 Census.[19] It is located within the Raritan Valley region.

The township has been one of the state's highest-income communities. Based on data from the 2012-2016 ACS, NJ.com ranked the township as having the fifth-highest income in the state, with a median household income of $173,473.[20] Based on data from the 2014–2018 ACS, the township residents had a median household income of $162,037, more than double the statewide median of $79,363.[21]

The township's name is thought to be from Tewkesbury, England. Since 2003, the two communities have been twinned.[22]

History[edit]

The area was originally settled by the Lenape Native Americans. European settlement began in 1708, when George Willocks acquired land from the Lenape in the area, followed by an acquisition by the proprietors of West Jersey of a tract covering 100,000 acres (160 sq mi; 400 km2).

The township was first mentioned as holding a township meeting on March 11, 1755, as having been formed partly from Lebanon Township, though the exact circumstances of its formation by charter are unknown. Tewksbury was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial 104 townships by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken to form Califon borough (April 2, 1898). Portions of the township were acquired from Readington Township in 1832 and 1861, and portions were transferred to Clinton Township in 1871 and 1891.[23]

The original settlers were of English extraction and were followed by a large German contingent who began to settle in the area around 1749 and became the strongest influence around the time Tewksbury became a township. Their community was known as New Germantown, a name that survived until World War I when prejudice against Germans led residents to change the community's name to Oldwick.[22] The more than 100 structures and its mixture of Victorian, Federal, New England and Georgian style homes in Oldwick is protected by its listing on the National Register of Historic Places.[24] Established in 1714 and granted a Royal Charter in 1767, Zion Lutheran Church in Oldwick is the oldest German Lutheran parish in New Jersey.[25]

Oldwick is home to Mane Stream, a Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship (PATH) Premier Accredited Center for therapeutic horseback riding.[26]

Geography[edit]

Oldwick Center

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.78 square miles (82.30 km2), including 31.65 square miles (81.96 km2) of land and 0.13 square miles (0.34 km2) of water (0.41%).[1][2]

Tewksbury Township borders Califon, Clinton Township, Lebanon Township and Readington Township in Hunterdon County; Chester Township and Washington Township in Morris County; and Bedminster Township in Somerset County.[27][28][29]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Apgar's Corner, Bissell, Cokesbury, Fairmount, Farmersville, Fox Hill, Laurel Farms, Lower Fairmount, Mountainville, New Germantown, Oldwick, Pottersville, Sutton and Vernoy.[30]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18101,308
18201,49013.9%
18301,65911.3%
18401,94417.2%
18502,30118.4%
18602,3331.4%
18702,327−0.3%
18802,108−9.4%
18902,034−3.5%
19001,883*−7.4%
19101,742−7.5%
19201,279−26.6%
19301,119−12.5%
19401,2007.2%
19501,43919.9%
19601,90832.6%
19702,95955.1%
19804,09438.4%
19904,80317.3%
20005,54115.4%
20105,9938.2%
2019 (est.)5,776[11][31][32]−3.6%
Population sources:
1810-1920[33] 1840[34]
1850-1870[35] 1850[36] 1870[37]
1880-1890[38] 1890-1910[39]
1910-1930[40] 1930-1990[41]
2000[42][43] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[23]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 5,993 people, 2,189 households, and 1,769 families in the township. The population density was 190.1 per square mile (73.4/km2). There were 2,323 housing units at an average density of 73.7 per square mile (28.5/km2). The racial makeup was 94.16% (5,643) White, 0.83% (50) Black or African American, 0.03% (2) Native American, 2.92% (175) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.82% (49) from other races, and 1.23% (74) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.49% (209) of the population.[8]

Of the 2,189 households, 34.9% had children under the age of 18; 73.0% were married couples living together; 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present and 19.2% were non-families. Of all households, 15.3% were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.05.[8]

25.3% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 15.2% from 25 to 44, 38.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.3 years. For every 100 females, the population had 97.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 96.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $160,224 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,609) and the median family income was $189,833 (+/- $21,901). Males had a median income of $128,177 (+/- $22,406) versus $90,833 (+/- $32,868) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $91,644 (+/- $13,544). About 0.9% of families and 1.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[44]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 5,541 people, 1,986 households, and 1,662 families residing in the township. The population density was 175.2 people per square mile (67.6/km2). There were 2,052 housing units at an average density of 64.9 per square mile (25.0/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 96.82% White, 0.52% African American, 1.88% Asian, 0.27% from other races, and 0.51% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.53% of the population.[42][43]

There were 1,996 households, out of which 36.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 77.2% were married couples living together, 5.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.3% were non-families. 12.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.79 and the average family size was 3.05.[42][43]

In the township the population was spread out, with 26.2% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 33.7% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.7 males.[42][43]

The median income for a household in the township was $135,649, and the median income for a family was $150,189. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $57,500 for females. The per capita income for the township was $65,470. About 1.6% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.[42][43]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Tewksbury Township is governed under the Township form of government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 565) statewide governed under this form.[45] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[6][46] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.[3]

As of 2020, members of the Tewksbury Township Committee are Mayor Peter L. Melick (R, term on township committee ends December 31, 2021; term as mayor ends 2020), Deputy Mayor Robert E. Becker (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2020), Dana D. Desiderio (R, 2021), Andrea B. Maranca (R, 2022) and William J. Voyce (R, 2022).[3][47][48][49][50][51][52]

In 2018, the township had an average property tax bill of $14,367, the highest in the county, compared to an average bill of $8,767 statewide.[53][54]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Tewksbury Township is located in the 7th Congressional District[55] and is part of New Jersey's 23rd state legislative district.[9][56][57] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Tewksbury Township had been in the 24th state legislative district.[58]

For the 117th United States Congress. New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Tom Malinowski (D, East Amwell Township).[59] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[60] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[61][62]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 23rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Michael J. Doherty (R, Washington Township, Warren County) and in the General Assembly by John DiMaio (R, Hackettstown) and Erik Peterson (R, Franklin Township, Hunterdon County).[63][64]

Hunterdon County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who serve three-year terms of office at-large on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held each January, the freeholders select one member to serve as the board's Director and another to serve as Deputy Director.[65] As of 2015, Hunterdon County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director John King (R; Raritan Township, 2015),[66] Freeholder Deputy Director Suzanne Lagay (R; Holland Township, 2016),[67] J. Matthew Holt (R; Clinton Town, 2015),[68] John E. Lanza (R; Flemington, 2016)[69] and Robert G. Walton (R; Hampton, 2017).[70][71] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Mary H. Melfi (R; Flemington, 2017),[72] Sheriff Fredrick W. Brown (R; Alexandria Township, 2016)[73] and Surrogate Susan J. Hoffman (R; Kingwood Township, 2018).[74][75][76]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 4,425 registered voters in Tewksbury Township, of which 699 (15.8%) were registered as Democrats, 2,310 (52.2%) were registered as Republicans and 1,412 (31.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[77]

In The 2016 presidential election, Republican Donald Trump received 57.6% (2,109 votes) of the vote, compared to 38.3% (1,402 votes) for Hillary Rodham Clinton and 4.1% (151 votes) for all other candidates.[78]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 66.6% of the vote (2,291 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 32.0% (1,100 votes), and other candidates with 1.5% (51 votes), among the 3,478 ballots cast by the township's 4,628 registered voters (36 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 75.2%.[79][80]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 60.7% of the vote (2,280 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 37.4% (1,403 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (39 votes), among the 3,754 ballots cast by the township's 4,502 registered voters, for a turnout of 83.4%.[81]

In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 66.7% of the vote (2,321 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 33.2% (1,156 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (25 votes), among the 3,480 ballots cast by the township's 4,171 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 83.4.[82]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 77.8% of the vote (1,706 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 20.3% (445 votes), and other candidates with 1.9% (41 votes), among the 2,238 ballots cast by the township's 4,551 registered voters (46 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 49.2%.[83][84] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 66.7% of the vote (1,982 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 21.5% (638 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.4% (310 votes) and other candidates with 0.2% (5 votes), among the 2,971 ballots cast by the township's 4,434 registered voters, yielding a 67.0% turnout.[85]

Education[edit]

The Tewksbury Township Schools is a public school district, which serves students in kindergarten through eighth grade.[86][87] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of two schools, had an enrollment of 541 students and 60.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.0:1.[88] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[89]) are Tewksbury Elementary School[90] with 321 students in grades PreK - 4 and Old Turnpike School[91] with 214 students in grades 5 - 8.[87][92][93] Tewksbury Elementary School was recognized in 2011 as a Blue Ribbon School by the United States Department of Education.[94] Old Turnpike School was one of nine schools in New Jersey honored in 2020 by the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program, which recognizes high student achievement.[95][96]

The original elementary school, Sawmill, opened in 1951 and was sold in 2003 for $1 million to the Hunterdon County Educational Services Commission.[97]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Voorhees High School in Lebanon Township (although the mailing address is Glen Gardner), which also serves students from Califon Borough, Glen Gardner Borough, Hampton Borough, High Bridge Borough and Lebanon Township.[87][98] As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 982 students and 83.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.8:1.[99] The school is part of the North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District, which also includes students from Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough and Union Township who attend North Hunterdon High School in Annandale.[100][101][102]

Eighth grade students from all of Hunterdon County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Hunterdon County Vocational School District, a county-wide vocational school district that offers career and technical education at its campuses in Raritan Township and at programs sited at local high schools, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.[103]

Transportation[edit]

I-78 eastbound in Tewksbury

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 99.22 miles (159.68 km) of roadways, of which 82.81 miles (133.27 km) were maintained by the municipality, 15.39 miles (24.77 km) by Hunterdon County and 1.02 miles (1.64 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[104]

Interstate 78[105] passes through the Township, and is accessible via Oldwick Road (County Route 523) at Exit 24.[106] County Route 517 also passes through the Township.[107]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Tewksbury Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Township Committee, Tewksbury Township. Accessed March 11, 2020. "The Township of Tewksbury is governed by a five member Township Committee, with one member selected annually to serve as Mayor for a one-year term. Township Committee members are elected at large and serve staggered three-year terms."
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020. As of date accessed, William Voyce is incorrectly listed as mayor.
  5. ^ a b Administration, Tewksbury Township. Accessed March 11, 2020.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Tewksbury, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Tewksbury township Archived April 24, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  11. ^ a b QuickFacts for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey; Hunterdon County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Tewksbury Township, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  14. ^ Tewksbury Township Tax Map, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed April 18, 2020.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Califon, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 7, 2014.
  16. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Geographic codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
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  21. ^ https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/fact/table/tewksburytownshiphunterdoncountynewjersey,NJ/PST045219
  22. ^ a b History, Tewksbury Township. Accessed November 21, 2019. "The name, Tewksbury, is believed to have originated from a connection with Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire, England. The two townships established a sister city relationship in 2003."
  23. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 154. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  24. ^ National Register of Historic Places Inventory - Nomination Form for Oldwick Historic District, National Park Service, received September 30, 1988. Accessed November 21, 2019. "The Oldwick Historic District is composed of 127 contributing buildings and outbuildings, 12 contributing structures and 1 contributing site (church cemetery).... them, the Georgian/Federal, Greek Revival, and Italianate styles appear to have been most widely adapted by district builders."
  25. ^ Staff. "1767 charter is restored for Zion Lutheran in Tewksbury", September 18, 2011, updated March 31, 2019. Accessed November 21, 2019. "The Royal Charter, which was granted to Zion in 1767 by King George III, is on parchment and measures about 20" x 28".... Zion Lutheran Church is the oldest Lutheran congregation in New Jersey. Most of the charter members of the church had fled from the Palatinate area of Germany and its long series of wars and severe tax burdens. The first service was led by Justus Falckner on Aug. 1, 1714, at the home of Aree van Guinee, a freed slave."
  26. ^ About, Mane Stream. Accessed September 22, 2014.
  27. ^ Areas touching Tewksbury Township, MapIt. Accessed March 11, 2020.
  28. ^ Map of County Municipalities, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  29. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  30. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed December 20, 2014.
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  34. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed July 21, 2013. Population listed for 1840 of 1,952 is eight higher than value listed in table for that year.
  35. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 268, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 21, 2013. "Tewksbury township was formed in 1798. Its population in 1850 was 2,301; in 1860, 2,333; and in 1870, 2,327. New Germantown, Fairmount, Farmersville and Mountainville are in this township."
  36. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 139. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 19, 2013.
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  41. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  42. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Archived April 19, 2014, at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  43. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  44. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Tewksbury township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 15, 2012.
  45. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  46. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  47. ^ 2019 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Tewksbury Township. Accessed November 21, 2019.
  48. ^ Township of Tewksbury, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed March 11, 2020.
  49. ^ 2020 County and Municipal Directory, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed March 11, 2020.
  50. ^ Hunterdon County District Canvass November 5, 2019, General Election, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, updated November 14, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  51. ^ District Canvass November 6, 2018 Official Results, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, updated November 14, 2018. Accessed January 1, 2019.
  52. ^ District Canvass November 7, 2017 Official Results, Hunterdon County, New Jersey, updated November 9, 2017. Accessed January 1, 2018.
  53. ^ 2018 Property Tax Information, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, updated January 16, 2019. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  54. ^ Marcus, Samantha. "These are the towns with the highest property taxes in each of N.J.’s 21 counties", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, April 22, 2019. Accessed November 5, 2019. "The average property tax bill in New Jersey was $8,767 last year. But there can be big swings from town to town and county to county.... The average property tax bill in Tewksbury Township was $14,367 in 2018, the highest in Hunterdon County."
  55. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  56. ^ 2019 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  57. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  59. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed June 1, 2020.
  60. ^ [1], United States Senate. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  61. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  62. ^ [2]. United States Senate. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  63. ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018.
  64. ^ District 23 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018.
  65. ^ About the Board, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  66. ^ John King, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  67. ^ Suzanne Lagay, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  68. ^ J. Matthew Holt, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  69. ^ John E. Lanza, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  70. ^ Robert G. Walton, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
  71. ^ Hunterdon County Board of Chosen Freeholders, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
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  73. ^ Frederick W. Brown; Hunterdon County Sheriff, Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Accessed January 8, 2015.
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  101. ^ Information Regarding Choice of District School, North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed January 4, 2015. "In the past, parents and students of the North Hunterdon High School sending districts were able to select either North Hunterdon High School or Voorhees High School as their school of choice.... As our student population continued to grow and our two high schools reached, and exceeded, 90% capacity, the option of choosing Voorhees was eliminated in the 2005-2006 school year for the North Hunterdon sending districts (Bethlehem Township, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough and Union Township – Clinton Town students still have choice as they are classmates at Clinton Public School with Glen Gardner students, who attend Voorhees)."
  102. ^ About the District, North Hunterdon-Voorhees Regional High School District. Accessed January 4, 2015. "North Hunterdon High School educates students from: Bethlehem Township, Clinton Town, Clinton Township, Franklin Township, Lebanon Borough, Union Township; Voorhees High School educates students from: Califon, Glen Gardner, Hampton, High Bridge, Lebanon Township, Tewksbury Township"
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  105. ^ Interstate 78 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated March 2016. Accessed November 21, 2019.
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  111. ^ Staff. "Mountain Lakes alumnus Bucco preps for championship game", Daily Record (Morristown), May 25, 2008. Accessed March 14, 2011. "Princeton's Dan Cocoziello of Oldwick, earned first-team honors for the first time in his four-year collegiate career."
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