Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi

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Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi
Texas A&M–Corpus Christi seal.svg
MottoThe Island University
TypePublic research university
Established1947; 73 years ago (1947)
Parent institution
Texas A&M University System
Endowment$14.8 million[1]
PresidentKelly M. Miller
ProvostClarenda Phillips
Academic staff
712
Students11,929 (Fall 2018)[2]
Location, ,
United States

27°42′44″N 97°19′31″W / 27.7121°N 97.3254°W / 27.7121; -97.3254Coordinates: 27°42′44″N 97°19′31″W / 27.7121°N 97.3254°W / 27.7121; -97.3254
CampusIsland, 396 acres (1602555.14 M²)[3]
ColorsBlue, Green, and Silver[4]
     
NicknameIslanders
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division ISouthland
MascotIzzy the Islander[3]
Websitetamucc.edu
Texas A&M–Corpus Christi logo.svg

Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi (Texas A&M–Corpus Christi, TAMU-CC, A&M-Corpus Christi, or A&M-CC) is a public research university in Corpus Christi, Texas. It is part of the Texas A&M University System[5] and classified among "R2: Doctoral Universities – High research activity".[6]

History[edit]

The university's island campus.
The university's island campus.
Pottery exhibit by Art students in the Dr. Hector P. Garcia Plaza

TAMU-CC originally opened in 1947 as the University of Corpus Christi, a private university operated by the Baptist General Convention of Texas (BGCT).

After the campus was nearly totally destroyed by Hurricane Celia in 1970, the school (which had financial problems since the outset) could not afford to rebuild, and requested the Texas Legislature for assistance. The Legislature approved opening a branch of the Texas A&M University System the following year; UCC would hold its final graduating class in 1973 and BGCT would sell the campus to the State shortly thereafter, retaining 10 acres to maintain a student religious center.[7]

Originally named Texas A&I University at Corpus Christi it was later named Corpus Christi State University before joining the Texas A&M University System in 1989 and taking its current name.[8]

Academics[edit]

University rankings
National
U.S. News & World Report[9] 293-381
Washington Monthly[10] 214
Global
THE[11] 800

Texas A&M-Corpus Christi offers 33 undergraduate majors, 25 graduate programs, and six doctoral programs through six colleges.[12]

The College of Liberal Arts[13] has seven departments, housing 12 undergraduate and six graduate degrees, ranging from the arts to criminal justice to psychology.

The College of Business[14] offers eight undergraduate and two graduate degrees and is accredited by AACSB.

The College of Education and Human Development[15] offers teacher certification in more than 30 areas as well as three undergraduate degrees, 11 graduate programs, and two doctoral programs.

The College of Science and Engineering[16] offers 12 undergraduate and five graduate degrees.

The College of Nursing and Health Sciences[17] offers two undergraduate degrees and four graduate degrees including the Doctor of Nursing Practice.

The College of University Studies offers a degree in University Studies.[18]

The university also has two schools:

The School of Arts, Media, and Communication within the College of Liberal Arts.[19]

The School of Engineering and Computing Sciences within the College of Science and Engineering.[20]

Research[edit]

According to SCImago Institutions Rankings, between 2007 and 2011, Texas A&M University Corpus Christi ranked 261 in the World by normalized impact of publications. In 2013, it ranked 2247 in the World by quality of publications, and 2548 by publication output.[21]

As of March 2016, the total number of Google Scholar citations of the first 20 researcher affiliated with the university is 39,283.[22] According to the Ranking Web of Universities, Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi ranks 1551 in the World, 491 in North America and 360 in the USA.[23]

In spring 2014 the university put forward the momentum 20/20 vision aiming to become an emerging research university with an unparalleled commitment to every student’s success, closing gaps in achievement and delivering a robust campus experience. The university has significantly improved its research activities in the recent years, notably in the field of coastal and marine sciences as well as in geospatial engineering.[24]

Centers, institutes, and affiliates[edit]

TAMUCC Entrance and Harte Research Institute building
The Carlos Truan Natural Resource Building, opened in 1993, was named in honor of late State Senator C. Truan of Corpus Christi, who helped to obtain funding for the facility.[25]

The Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science is a research institute dedicated to geospatial science.[26] The Institute was founded by an endowment from the Conrad Blucher family. Research by the institute includes the Texas Coastal Ocean Observation Network (a tide monitoring system), Texas Spatial Reference Center research for the Texas Height Modernization, and other geospatial research relating to surveying and mapping.

The Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies brings scientists to the campus to strengthen TAMU-CC's research on environmental issues facing the Gulf of Mexico, area wetlands, coastal waterways, and beaches. Other centers on campus conduct research on biodiversity through offshore scientific diving expeditions,[27] and aid in oil spill response, hurricane tracking, and commercial shipping.

The Lone Star UAS Center of Excellence & Innovation is one of the six unmanned aircraft system test sites in the USA, designated by the Federal Aviation Administration in 2014.[28]

Student life[edit]

Student government[edit]

The Student Government Association at TAMU-CC hosts the officers of the student body.[29] The SGA runs a three-branch system, with the Executive Board consisting of the Student Body Officers,[30] the Legislative Branch consisting of the Student Senate,[31] and the Judicial Branch consisting of the Chief and Associate Justices.[32]

The current legislative branch, or Student Senate, has two underlying groups of senators: general senators, which holds an international senator, student veteran senator, housing senator, athletics senator, disability services senator, and library senator. The college senators, which holds three senators for each of the seven colleges: Business, Education & Human Development, Liberal Arts, Nursing & Health Sciences, Science & Engineering, Graduate Studies, and University College.

Elections for SGA are held twice a year, once near the close of the spring for all positions, and then at the opening of the fall for the freshman senators and remaining vacancies from the spring elections.

Publications[edit]

TAMU-CC has an entirely student-run newspaper, Island Waves.[33] It was first published in 1993, and is, in part, funded through student fees and advertisement sales.[34] Issues are published every Thursday throughout the fall and spring semesters, with three issues printed over the summer.

Islander Magazine is a biannual news publication for Texas A&M University–Corpus Christi, first published in the Fall of 2006.

Greek life[edit]

TAMU-CC is home to three Interfraternity Council Fraternities (IFC): Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Phi Epsilon, and Sigma Pi.[35] The university has four National Panhellenic Sororities (NPC). Alpha Gamma Delta, Delta Delta Delta, Gamma Phi Beta, and Zeta Tau Alpha.[36] The university also has six Multicultural Greek Council organizations (MGC): Lambda Theta Alpha, Sigma Lambda Gamma, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Omega Delta Phi, Alpha Phi Alpha, and Kappa Delta Chi.[37] Greek Life is a growing aspect of the TAMU-CC campus gaining notoriety and size over the years since it began at the university in 1998.

Islander Dining Hall[edit]

The Dining Hall opened in 2014.[38]

Islander Dining Hall has been designated as an Ocean Friendly Restaurant (OFR).[39] It is the second university dining hall in the nation to receive the designation.[39] As part of 400 OFR in the U.S., Islander Dining Hall is working to lower an estimated 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic entering the world's marine ecosystems.[39] Elizabeth Alford, Marketing Manager for the Islander Dining Hall, said of the designation:

"With the university surrounded by Oso Bay and Corpus Christi Bay, it is important that we take initiative to reduce the amount of plastic and Styrofoam waste that could potentially come from Islander Dining Hall. . . . It is imperative that we use our location as an educational tool for our students. This recognition encourages our community to be stewards of the environment."[39]

Islander Dining Hall has banned the use of Styrofoam, plastic bags, plastic plates, and plastic utensils.[39] Islander Dining Hall also uses reusable food-ware for onsite dining, recycles, and provides biodegradable coffee cups and to-go plates.[39]

Athletics[edit]

Texas A&M-Corpus Christi joined the Southland Conference as of 2006-07 as a non-football member.[40] Before that, it had been an independent since it began offering Division III sports in 1999.

TAMUCC offers 5 men's sports: baseball, basketball, cross country, tennis, and track and field; as well as 8 women's sports: basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track and field, beach volleyball, and volleyball.[41]

TAMUCC teams all compete under the team name Islanders, the name taken from TAMUCC being located on an island. Their mascot is "Izzy the Islander", a costumed man with a tiki mask headdress, grass skirt and spear.[42] Prior to that, the official mascot was "Tarpie" the Tarpon.

Men's basketball[edit]

The Islanders basketball team is coached by Willis Wilson[43] and play their home games at the American Bank Center as well as at the Dugan Wellness Center on the University's campus. They have played in the NCAA tournament once, in 2007, losing in the first round.

Women's cross country[edit]

The Islander cross country team is regarded as the most successful sport in school history, as the women's team has won 7 out of the 9 conference titles (more than any other team in the history of Texas universities). In 2009, they scored the highest at the regional meet, with a 6th-place finish. In 2018, under new head coach Brent Ericksen, the Islander women won the Southland conference title by one point, making the win the smallest margin in Southland Conference history.

Facilities[edit]

Notable buildings on campus:[44]

  • Bay Hall
  • Corpus Christi Hall
  • Dr. Robert R. Furgason Engineering Building
  • Dugan Wellness Center
  • Early Childhood Development Center
  • Michael and Karen O'Connor Building
  • Mary and Jeff Bell Library
  • Performing Arts Center
  • Tidal Hall
  • University Center

Community engagement[edit]

Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi operates the Coastal Bend Business Innovation Center as part of the College of Business.[45] The center is a U.S. Economic Development Administration University Center.[46] The center provides support for new ventures to resident (on-site) and non-resident clients.[47]

The Art Museum of South Texas has been affiliated with the university since 1995.[48] The museum traces its roots to the Centennial Museum founded in 1936[48] and now occupies an area on Corpus Christi Bay across the channel from the Texas State Aquarium. The Art museum is one of several attractions that are part of the Sports, Entertainment and Arts (SEA) district of Corpus Christi.[49]

The university operates the Antonio E. Garcia Arts & Education Center.[50] The center provides programming and classes for the community and particularly for k-12 students and those who are at-risk students.[51]

Notable people[edit]

Presidents[edit]

Presidents of TAMUCC years as president
1 E. S. Hutcherson (1947–1948)
2 R. M. Cavness (1948–1951)
3 W. A. Miller (1952–1965)
4 Joseph Clapp (1966–1968)
5 Leonard Holloway (1968–1969)
6 Kenneth Maroney (1969–1973)
7 Whitney D. Halladay (1973–1977)
8 Barney Alan Sugg (1977–1989)
9 Robert R. Furgason (1990–2004)
10 Flavius C. Killebrew (2004–2016)
11 Kelly M. Miller (2017–present)

Alumni[edit]

Notable faculty[edit]

Photo gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges/texas-am-corpus-christi-11161
  2. ^ "Total Texas A&M University System Enrollment".
  3. ^ a b "Fast Facts". Retrieved 16 July 2014.
  4. ^ https://designguide.tamucc.edu
  5. ^ "Universities". The Texas A&M University System. Retrieved 2020-07-31.
  6. ^ "Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi". Indiana University. 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2020.
  7. ^ The Baptist Standard
  8. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "A Brief History Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-07-31.
  9. ^ "2021 Best National University Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  10. ^ "2020 National University Rankings". Washington Monthly. Retrieved August 31, 2020.
  11. ^ "World University Rankings 2021". THE Education Ltd. Retrieved September 2, 2020.
  12. ^ https://gradschool.tamucc.edu/atoz_terminal.html
  13. ^ Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, College of Liberal Arts
  14. ^ "Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, College of Business". Archived from the original on 2017-11-11. Retrieved 2017-11-10.
  15. ^ Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, College of Education
  16. ^ "Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, College of Science and Engineering". Archived from the original on 2017-11-11. Retrieved 2017-11-10.
  17. ^ Texas A&M University Corpus Christi, College of Nursing and Health Sciences
  18. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "University Studies Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-07-31.
  19. ^ "SAMC". cla.tamucc.edu. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  20. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "School of Engineering and Computing Sciences Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  21. ^ Scimago Institutions Rankings
  22. ^ TAMUCC Google Scholar
  23. ^ TAMUCC ranking by Google Scholar Citations
  24. ^ [1]
  25. ^ "Rick Spruill, "Remembering Carlos Truan (1935-2012), April 11, 2012". Corpus Christi Caller-Times. Retrieved August 25, 2013.
  26. ^ Conrad Blucher Institute for Surveying and Science
  27. ^ Dokken, Quenton R (1999). "Application of Technical Diving Technology to the Study of Natural and Artificial Reefs in the Gulf of Mexico". In: Hamilton RW, Pence DF, Kesling DE, eds. Assessment and Feasibility of Technical Diving Operations for Scientific Exploration. American Academy of Underwater Sciences. Retrieved 2011-01-08.
  28. ^ Lone Star UAS Center of Excellence & Innovation
  29. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "About SGA Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  30. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Executive Branch Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  31. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Legislative Branch Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  32. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Judicial Branch Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  33. ^ "Island Waves". Island Waves. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  34. ^ "About Us". Island Waves. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  35. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Interfraternity Council Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  36. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Interfraternity Council Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  37. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Multicultural Greek Council Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  38. ^ "TAMUCC Holds Grand Opening of New Dining Hall". kiiitv.com. Retrieved 2020-10-25.
  39. ^ a b c d e f Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Islander Dining Hall Celebrates 'Ocean Friendly' Recognition". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2019-11-14.
  40. ^ "About the Southland". www.southland.org. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  41. ^ "Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Athletics - Official Athletics Website". Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Athletics. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  42. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Spirit & Traditions Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  43. ^ "Staff Directory". Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Athletics. Retrieved 2020-08-01.
  44. ^ "Campus Map Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  45. ^ "Coastal Bend Innovation Center". cbbic.tamucc.edu. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  46. ^ "University Center Economic Development Program: TX Programs | U.S. Economic Development Administration". www.eda.gov. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  47. ^ "Coastal Bend Innovation Center". cbbic.tamucc.edu. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  48. ^ a b Texas, Art Museum of South. "About". Art Museum of South Texas. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  49. ^ Christi, Downtown Corpus (2017-10-11). "SEA District | Downtown Corpus Christi". Marina Arts in Downtown Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  50. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "Antonio E. Garcia Arts & Education Center Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  51. ^ Christi, Texas A&M University-Corpus. "About Us Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi". Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi. Retrieved 2020-08-02.
  52. ^ Kim Henkel on the IMDB

External links[edit]