2010 Texas gubernatorial election

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2010 Texas gubernatorial election

← 2006 November 2, 2010 2014 →
Turnout38% (of registered voters)
27% (of eligible voters)[1]
  Rick Perry by Gage Skidmore 3 (cropped).jpg Bill White for Texas (41591).jpg
Nominee Rick Perry Bill White
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 2,737,481 2,106,395
Percentage 55.0% 42.3%

2010 Texas gubernatorial election results map by county.svg
County results
Perry:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
White:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

Governor before election

Rick Perry
Republican

Elected Governor

Rick Perry
Republican

The 2010 Texas gubernatorial election was held on Tuesday, November 2, 2010, to elect the Governor of Texas. Incumbent Republican Governor Rick Perry ran successfully for election to a third consecutive term. He won the Republican primary against U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison and political newcomer, Debra Medina. The former mayor of Houston, Bill White, won the Democratic nomination. Kathie Glass, a lawyer from Houston and previous candidate for Texas Attorney General, won the Libertarian nomination. Deb Shafto was the nominee of the Texas Green Party. Andy Barron, an orthodontist from Lubbock, was a declared write-in candidate.

Exit polls showed Perry winning Whites (71% to 29%), while White performed well among African Americans (88% to 12%) and Latinos (61% to 38%)

Perry's fourth inauguration for a third full four-year term began on January 18, 2011, on the State Capitol South Grounds.

Election rules[edit]

Texas does not have term limits for its governors; thus, gubernatorial incumbents are free to run as often as they want if they are eligible for the office.

The Republicans and Democrats chose their gubernatorial nominees based on the results of primary votes held on March 2, 2010 (the first Tuesday in March.[2]) Both parties' candidates received at least 20 percent of the total votes cast for governor in the 2006 election; thus, they must nominate their candidates via primary election.[3]

Any third-party which obtains ballot access must nominate its candidates via a statewide convention, which by law must be held on June 12, 2010 (the second Saturday in June.[4]) The Libertarian Party obtained ballot access automatically due to its 2008 showing, in which one of its nominees attracted over one million votes.

In the primary election the party's winning candidate must garner a majority (over 50%) of votes cast; otherwise, the top two candidates face each other in a runoff election. However, in the general election, the winning candidate needs only a plurality of votes to be elected Governor (as was the case with the 2006 election and the 1990 election, in which Libertarian Jeff Daiell attracted over 129,000 votes).

Independent and write-in candidates may seek ballot access; however, the criteria for such access are quite strict (see "Ballot Access" below). Nevertheless, in the 2006 election, two independent candidates, Carole Keeton Strayhorn, the Republican State Comptroller, and Kinky Friedman, a popular Texas country musician, obtained enough signatures to qualify. The Libertarian nominee, James Werner, was on the ballot automatically because of that party's Texas showing in the 2004 general election.

Ballot access[edit]

Political party candidates[edit]

Any political party whose candidate for governor, during the 2006 election, garnered at least 20 percent of the total votes cast, must nominate all its candidates for all offices sought via primary election.[3] In the 2006 election, both the Democratic candidate (Chris Bell) and the Republican candidate (Rick Perry) received this many votes; thus, both parties must hold primary elections using the two-round system. The primary elections must be held on the first Tuesday in March,[2] and a candidate must receive a majority of votes cast in the primary election;[5] otherwise, a runoff election between the top two finishers must be held[6] on the second Tuesday in April.[7]

A political party whose candidate for governor, during the 2006 election, received at least two percent but less than 20 percent of the total votes cast, may nominate its candidates for all offices sought via either a primary election (using the two-round system) or a state convention. If the party chooses to conduct a primary election, it must notify the Texas Secretary of State at least one year prior to the general election date and must nominate all its candidates via primary election.[8] No third-party candidate met this requirement in 2006; the last to do so was the Libertarian Party in 1990 (when nominee Jeff Daiell polled over 3.3% of the vote).

All other political parties must nominate their candidates via state convention,[9] which by law must be held on the second Saturday in June.[4] In order to qualify for ballot access at the general election, the party must either:

  • have had at least one candidate, in the previous statewide election, garner at least five percent of the total votes cast for that office[10] (only the Libertarian Party met this requirement), or
  • within 75 days after conducting its precinct conventions, submit lists of said conventions, whose total participant count equals at least one percent of the total votes cast in the previous gubernatorial election.[11]
  • If the political party cannot meet the precinct convention count requirement, it may file a supplemental petition, the number of signatures on which, when added to the count from the precinct convention lists, totals the required one percent,[12] but must do so within the 75-day period above. Any person signing a supplemental petition must not have voted in any party's primary election or runoff election, or participated in any other third-party's convention.[13]

Independent candidates[edit]

Should an independent gubernatorial candidate seek ballot access in the state of Texas, the candidate must meet the following requirements:

  • The candidate must obtain signatures from registered voters, in an amount equalling at least one percent of the total votes cast in the prior gubernatorial election,[14] the same as for third-party access.
  • The signatures must come from registered voters who did not vote in either the Democratic or Republican primaries or in any runoff elections for governor.[15]
  • The signatures must come from registered voters who have not signed a petition for any other independent candidate. If a supporter signed more than one petition, only the first signature counts.[16]
  • The signatures cannot be obtained until after the primary election (if either political party primary requires a runoff election, the signatures cannot be obtained until after such runoff election)[17] and the petition must be filed no later than 5:00 pm (Austin time, the filing must be with the Texas Secretary of State) on the 30th day after the scheduled runoff primary election day (even if none is held).[18]

Write-in candidates[edit]

In the event a candidate does not qualify for independent status, the person may still run as a write-in candidate. The candidate must either:[19]

  • pay a $3,750 filing fee,[20] or
  • submit 5,000 qualified signatures.[21] However, the petition must be filed by 5:00 pm of the 70th day before general election day, and cannot be filed earlier than 30 days before this deadline.[22]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Rick Perry
Statewide officials
Local officials
Individuals
Organizations
Debra Medina
Individuals
Organizations
Kay Bailey Hutchinson

Polling[edit]

Note: polls used different sample sizes and citizen groups. A candidate must have a majority of the vote (>50%) to avoid a runoff with their second place opponent.

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Rick
Perry
Kay Bailey
Hutchison
Debra
Medina
Other Unde-
cided
Rasmussen Reports February 23, 2010 48% 27% 16% 9%
Public Policy Polling (report) February 19–21, 2010 40% 31% 20% 9%
Research 2000 (report) February 8–10, 2010 42% 30% 17% 11%
Public Policy Polling (report) February 4–7, 2010 39% 28% 24% 10%
University of Texas (report) February 1–7, 2010 45% 21% 19% 16%
Rasmussen Reports (report) February 1, 2010 44% 29% 16% 11%
Rasmussen Reports (report) January 17, 2010 43% 33% 12% 11%
Rasmussen Reports (report) November 13, 2009 46% 35% 4% 14%
University of Texas (report) November 3, 2009 42% 30% 7% 4% 18%
Rasmussen Reports (report) September 16, 2009 38% 40% 3% 19%
Rasmussen Reports (report) July 15, 2009 46% 36% 5% 14%
Texas Politics (report) June 11–22, 2009 38% 27% 8% 26%
38% 26% 9% 27%
Texas Lyceum (report) June 5–12, 2009 33% 21% 1% 41%
Rasmussen Reports (report) May 7, 2009 42% 38% 7% 13%
Texas Politics (report) February 24 – March 6, 2009 29% 37% 10% 24%
Public Policy Polling (report) February 18–20, 2009 31% 56%
Texas Lyceum (report) June 12–20, 2008 22% 35%

Results[edit]

Results of the Republican gubernatorial primary by county:
  Rick Perry
  Kay Bailey Hutchison
  Debra Medina
  No votes
Republican primary results[70]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Rick Perry (incumbent) 758,222 51.1
Republican Kay Bailey Hutchison 450,196 30.3
Republican Debra Medina 275,693 18.6
Total votes 1,484,111 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Bill White
Executive officials
Federal officials
Statewide officials
State officials
Local officials
Newspapers and publications

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Felix
Alvarado
Alma
Aguado
Kinky
Friedman*
Tom
Schieffer*
Bill
White
Farouk
Shami
Unde-
cided
Public Policy Polling (report) February 19–21, 2010 5% 3% 59% 12% 18%
Public Policy Polling (report) February 4–7, 2010 5% 2% 49% 19% 24%
University of Texas (report) October 20–27, 2009 2% 19% 10% 55%
University of Texas (report) June 11–22, 2009 12% 2% 62%
Texas Lyceum (report) June 5–12, 2007 10% 6% 73%
Wilson Research (report) September 21, 2007 9% 12% 30%

* Dropped out prior to the primary.

Results[edit]

Results of the Democratic gubernatorial primary by county:
White
  •   White—>90%
  •   White—80-90%
  •   White—70-80%
  •   White—60-70%
  •   White—50-60%
  •   White—40-50%
  •   White—<40%
No vote
  •   No vote
Democratic primary results[70][93]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bill White 516,621 76.0
Democratic Farouk Shami 87,268 12.8
Democratic Felix Alvarado 33,708 5.0
Democratic Alma Aguado 19,556 2.9
Democratic Clement E. Glenn 9,852 1.4
Democratic Bill Dear 6,574 1.0
Democratic Star Locke 6,298 0.9
Total votes 679,877 100

General election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
Cook Political Report[97] Tossup October 14, 2010
Rothenberg[98] Lean R October 28, 2010
RealClearPolitics[99] Lean R November 1, 2010
Sabato's Crystal Ball[100] Likely R October 28, 2010
CQ Politics[101] Lean R October 28, 2010

Polling[edit]

Poll
source
Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Rick
Perry
(R)
Kathie
Glass
(L)
Bill
White
(D)
Other Unde-
cided
Public Policy Polling (report) October 26–28, 2010 568 ± 4.1% 53% 44% 3%
Lighthouse Opinion and Polling Research (report) October 15–17, 2010 1200 ± 2.9% 48% 3% 37% 1% 11%
Public Policy Polling (report) September 2–6, 2010 538 ± 4.2% 48% 42% 10%
Rasmussen Reports (report) August 22, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 49% 41% 3% 7%
Rasmussen Reports (report) July 13, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 50% 41% 2% 7%
Public Policy Polling (report) June 19–21, 2010 500 ± 4.4% 43% 43% 14%
Rasmussen Reports (report) June 16, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 48% 40% 5% 8%
Rasmussen Reports (report) May 13, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 51% 38% 4% 6%
Rasmussen Reports (report) April 14, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 48% 44% 2% 6%
Rasmussen Reports (report) March 3, 2010 500 ± 4.5% 49% 43% 3% 6%
Rasmussen Reports (report) February 22, 2010 1,200 ± 3.0% 47% 41% 5% 7%
Public Policy Polling (report) February 4–7, 2010 1,200 ± 2.8% 48% 42% 10%
Rasmussen Reports (report) February 1, 2010 1,000 ± 3.0% 48% 39% 5% 8%
Rasmussen Reports (report[permanent dead link]) January 17, 2010 1,000 ± 3.0% 50% 40% 4% 6%

Results[edit]

2010 Texas gubernatorial election[102]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Rick Perry (incumbent) 2,737,481 54.97 +15.95
Democratic Bill White 2,106,395 42.30 +12.52
Libertarian Kathie Glass 109,211 2.19 +1.58
Green Deb Shafto 19,516 0.39 +0.39
Independent Andy Barron (write-in) 7,267 0.15
Majority 631,086 12.67
Turnout 4,979,870
Republican hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Turnout and Voter Registration Figures (1970-current)". www.sos.state.tx.us. Retrieved September 24, 2021.
  2. ^ a b Texas Election Code, Section 41.007(a).
  3. ^ a b Texas Election Code, Section 172.001.
  4. ^ a b Texas Election Code, Section 181.061(a).
  5. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 172.003.
  6. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 172.004.
  7. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 41.007(b).
  8. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 172.002.
  9. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 181.003.
  10. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 181.005(b).
  11. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 181.005(a).
  12. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 181.006(b)(2).
  13. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 181.006(g).
  14. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 142.007.
  15. ^ Texas Election Code, Sections 142.008 and 142.009.
  16. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 141.066.
  17. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 142.009(1).
  18. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 142.006(a).
  19. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 146.023 (filing fee or signatures required).
  20. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 146.0231 (referencing Section 172.024).
  21. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 146.0230 (referencing Section 172.025).
  22. ^ Texas Election Code, Section 146.025.
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External links[edit]

Debate:

Voter resources:

Republican candidates for Governor:

Democratic candidates for Governor:

Libertarian candidate for governor:

Third party/Independent candidates for Governor: