Thailand national football team

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Thailand
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)ช้างศึก (Changsuek)
(The War elephants)
AssociationFootball Association of Thailand (FAT)
ConfederationAFC (Asia)
Sub-confederationAFF (Southeast Asia)
Head coachMilovan Rajevac
CaptainChalermpong Kerdkaew
Most capsKiatisuk Senamuang (134)
Top scorerKiatisuk Senamuang (71)
Home stadiumRajamangala Stadium
FIFA codeTHA
First colours
Second colours
Third colours
FIFA ranking
Current121 Increase 1 (25 October 2018)[1]
Highest43 (September 1998)
Lowest165 (October 2014)
Elo ranking
Current104 Increase 1 (17 November 2018)[2]
Highest62 (January 2001)
Lowest137 (April 1985)
First international
 Thailand 1–6 Republic of China 
(Bangkok, Thailand; 20 August 1948)[3]
Biggest win
 Thailand 10–0 Brunei 
(Bangkok, Thailand; 24 May 1971)
Biggest defeat
 United Kingdom 9–0 Thailand 
(Melbourne, Australia; 30 November 1956)
AFC Asian Cup
Appearances7 (first in 1972)
Best result3rd place (1972)

The Thailand national football team (Thai: ฟุตบอลทีมชาติไทย, RTGSfutbon thim chat thai, pronounced [fút.bɔ̄n tʰīːm t͡ɕʰâːt tʰāj]) represents Thailand in international men's association football. Officially nicknamed the War Elephants, the team is controlled by the governing body for football in Thailand, Football Association of Thailand (FAT), which is a member of the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and the regional ASEAN Football Federation (AFF).

With five ASEAN Football Championship titles and nine senior-level Southeast Asian Games titles, the team has a history as the most successful team in Southeast Asia. Thailand also won third place in the 1972 AFC Asian Cup, competed twice in the Summer Olympics and won fourth place in the 1990, 1998, 2002 and 2014 (with U23 Team) Asian Games.

History[edit]

1915–1995[edit]

Members of the very first Thailand national team squad.

The team was founded in 1915 as the Siam national football team and played its first unofficial match (against a team of Europeans) at the Royal Bangkok Sport Club Stadium on 20 December of that year. On 25 April 1916, King Vajiravudh established the Football Association of Siam. The team played its first international match in 1930 against the Indochina national team, which included both South Vietnamese and French players. Both the Siam team and its governing association were renamed in 1949 when Siam became Thailand.

King Vajiravudh Rama VI, the founder of the Football Association of Thailand.
Thai team at the 1956 Olympics, Melbourne before its biggest defeat by the United Kingdom.

Thailand appeared in the 1956 Summer Olympics in Melbourne, where they lost to Great Britain by a score of 0–9 (the largest defeat in team history) and failed to advance to the quarterfinals. In 1965, Thailand won the first place in the Southeast Asian Games for the first time.

The team made another appearance at the Summer Olympics in 1968, losing to Bulgaria 0–7, Guatemala 1–4, and Czechoslovakia 0–8 en route to a first-round exit. This was Thailand's latest appearance in the Olympics.

1992 featured one of Thailand's signature victories. Playing in Bangkok against South Korea, who had qualified for consecutive FIFA World Cups in 1986 and 1990, and being the strongest team in Asia at the time, the Thais upset the Koreans, beating them 2 to 1. Thailand would later defeat Bangladesh 1–0, winning the group and therefore qualifying for the 1992 AFC Asian Cup. The War Elephants would put on a strong performance at the tournament, drawing with eventual 3rd place China and Qatar before losing to eventual runners up Saudi Arabia 4 to nil.

In 1994, team manager Thawatchai Sartjakul assembled a team that has been renounced as Dream team with key players Kiatisuk "Zico" Senamuang, Tawan Sripan and Dusit Chalermsan.[4]

1996–2013[edit]

In 1996, Thailand defeated Malaysia 1–0 to win the ASEAN Football Championship (then called the Tiger Cup) for the first time. Thailand were favourites to regain the crown in 2007, 2008 and 2012 only to lose tight finals to Singapore and Vietnam respectively.

Thailand football team has competed three times in the Asian Games, making the semifinals in 1990, 1998 and 2002.

The 2007 AFC Asian Cup finals were held from 7 to 29 July 2007. For the first time in its history, the competition was co-hosted by four nations: Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam.

The 1998 Tiger Cup controversy[edit]

The regional 1998 ASEAN Football Championship tournament was perhaps most infamous in respect to Thailand football history. In what was supposedly a sporting event, the group stage match between Thailand and Indonesia was marred with an unsportsmanlike attempt. At the time both teams had already qualified for semi-finals, but with knowledge that winners would have to face hosts Vietnam, while the losing team would play the supposedly weaker Singapore. There was also technical incentive that facing Vietnam would mean moving training bases from Ho Chi Minh City to Hanoi – which none of the teams wished to do.[5]

The first half saw very little action as both teams barely making attempt to score. During the second half both teams managed to score, partly thanks to half-hearted defending, resulting in a 2–2 tie after 90 minutes. However the real infamy didn't take place until extra time, in which an Indonesian defender deliberately kicked the ball into his own goal with a Thai attacker running towards the ball.[6] FIFA fined both teams $40,000 for "violating the spirit of the game".

Ironically in the semi-finals, Thailand lost to Vietnam, and Indonesia also lost to Singapore, pitting the teams together once again for the third-place playoff. Indonesia eventually won by penalty shootout. As for the final, the unfancied Singapore team made one of the competition's biggest shocks by defeating Vietnam.

2000 AFC Asian Cup[edit]

Thailand qualified to the 2000 AFC Asian Cup held in Lebanon, which made Thailand sharing group with host Lebanon, Iran and Iraq. Thailand, however, performed relatively poor in the tournament. After defeated by Iraq 0–2, Thailand successfully drew giant Iran 1–1 but again Thailand only drew Lebanon with the same result, effectively putting them in third place, superior to Lebanon on goal differences. But since Thailand failed to gain any win, they were eliminated, by becoming the worst third-placed team as the tournament only featured three groups.

2000 AFF Championship[edit]

The final between Thailand and Indonesia, at a sold out and energised Rajamangala, was almost a carbon copy of their encounter in the group stages.The War Elephants again triumphed 4-1 with Worrawoot setting up camp at the opponents’ goal. The 28-year-old scored twice in their first match and in the final struck a hat-trick in the first 32 minutes.[8]

2002 AFF Championship[edit]

In the final match between Thailand and Indonesia, Thailand took a 2–0 lead against hosts Indonesia by the end of the first half. However, the Indonesians battled back to level the score and force the game into a penalty shootout, which was won 4–2 by the Thais.[10][11]

2004 AFC Asian Cup[edit]

Thailand qualified to the 2004 AFC Asian Cup in China, once again and Thailand was put into a tough group, which comprised Japan, Iran and debutant Oman. Nonetheless, with vast experiences in the Asian Cup, Thailand was, again, expected to pass through if they didn't lose to Iran and defeated Oman. However, Thailand's performance had even become a full disaster, worse than four years ago. Thailand opened their account with a 0–3 defeat to Iran, before losing 1–4 to Japan, effectively eliminated Thailand from the tournament. In the last match, Thailand lost again to debutant Oman, thus became the worst-performed team in the whole tournament. Thailand only scored 1 goal in the tournament.

2007 AFC Asian Cup[edit]

Thailand in the match with Oman in AFC Asian Cup 2007
Thailand football teams logo (2006–2017)

Thailand participated in 2007 AFC Asian Cup as co-host, together with Indonesia, Malaysia and Vietnam. This time, Thailand, considered to be the strongest host team among the four, was placed with debutant Australia, Oman and Iraq. Unlike 2004, Thailand had become more cautious and carefully prepared than before, as Thailand was beared as the leading Southeast Asian team, together with Indonesia, in the tournament, since both two participated in the latest edition.

Thailand opened their account by managing a 1–1 draw to Iraq, and it was not considered as a good result since Thailand was expected to outclass Iraq. Thailand took vengeance on Oman by defeating Oman 2–0, making the first time Thailand ever won a match in the Asian Cup on 90 minutes. With 4 points ahead, Thailand had a high chance to qualify to the next round for the first time since 1972, but Thailand's dream was totally shattered by Australia in a 0–4 demolition. This result ended Thailand's dream and once again, Thailand was knocked out from the group stage. Indonesia and Malaysia also failed in the same way, while Vietnam despite also lost the last match like the co-hosts, surprised by qualify into the next round for the first time in its history. Thailand's performance was heavily criticized aftermath, and it was seen as the end of Thailand's golden generation, with the retirements of Kiatisuk Senamuang, Pipat Thonkanya and Tawan Sripan. Pipat and Tawan would remain to play later, but received lesser calls aftermath before total retirement.

On 23 September 2009, Bryan Robson agreed to become coach of Thailand national team in his first foray into international football management.[12] He was contracted to manage the team through to the 2014 World Cup. On 14 November 2009, Robson celebrated his first competitive match in charge of the team with a 3–1 away victory against Singapore in a 2011 Asian Cup qualifying group match.[13] On 18 November 2009, Robson then suffered his first loss – a 1–0 defeat against Singapore on home soil. In January 2010, this was followed by two goalless draws with Jordan and Iran during 2011 Asian Cup qualifying. On 3 March 2010, Robson's Thailand suffered a 1–0 defeat by the hands of Iran in Tehran in their final Group E game, effectively ending their hopes of qualifying for 2011 Asian Cup. On 11 August 2010, Robson led Thailand to another victory against Singapore with a score of 1–0 on home soil. In September 2010, Robson overcame Bob Houghton's India in a friendly with a score of 2–1 away from home. In December 2010, Robson failed to bring Thailand past the Group A of the 2010 AFF Suzuki Cup after managing only draws against Laos and Malaysia and losing to Indonesia. He resigned as manager on 8 June 2011.[14]

In 2011, Rumours had been rife that the 61 years old Winfried Schäfer was favourite to succeed Bryan Robson, who ended his ill-fated two-year tenure earlier, citing health problems as the reason for his resignation.

During the 2014 World Cup Qualifiers, the War Elephants played well and built a lot of faith up in the fans. The attendance was nearly full house, War Elephants almost beat Australia at their home and even defeated Oman 3–0. This was in addition to the draw against Saudi Arabia, when the coach called up many young starlets to the team, which reflects on the fact that the squad have plenty of good players. In the 2012 AFF Suzuki Cup, Thailand reached the final after topping their group and knocking out Malaysia 3–1 on aggregate.[15] In the final Thailand lost the first leg 3–1 to Singapore and won the second leg 1–0, but lost on aggregate by 3–2.

In the 2015 AFC Asian Cup qualification Thailand suffered a massive setback, with their defensive frailities fully exposed by their Middle Eastern rivals. Thailand lost all 6 games in the qualifiers, conceding 21 goals in the process. In June 2013, Schäfer cancelled his contract. The FA of Thailand appointed Kiatisuk Senamuang as the new caretaker coach for national team. His first task was friendly match against China PR on 15 June, which Thailand decisively won 5–1.

2014–present[edit]

2014 AFF Championship[edit]

2014 AFF Suzuki Cup first leg of the finals starting line-up Thailand 2 - 0 Malaysia.[16]
Thailand national team celebrating after winning the 2014 AFF Suzuki Cup at Bukit Jalil National Stadium, Malaysia.

Thailand regained the title the champion of ASEAN football upon their fourth AFF Championship. The team did not lose at any match up until the second leg of the finals and also featured a spectacular tiki-taka style 27 consecutive passes during the first leg of the finals against Malaysia.[17] Thailand ended their 12-year drought in the AFF Suzuki Cup from the late goals by Charyl Chappuis(82') and Chanathip Songkrasin which gave them a dramatic 4–3 aggregate victory over Malaysia in the second leg of the final at Bukit Jalil National Stadium. Kiatisuk Senamuang consequently became the first person to win the ASEAN Football Championship as both a player and a coach. Kiatisuk gained much praise and credit for the team's recent achievements.

2016 AFF Championship[edit]

2016 AFF Suzuki Cup second leg of the finals starting line-up Thailand 2 - 0 Indonesia.[18]

On the first leg of the finals that was held in Bogor, Thailand lost 2–1 to Indonesia.[19] On the second leg of the finals, Thailand won Indonesia 2–0 at home. Thailand scored twice through Siroch Chatthong on a night when Rajamangala Stadium was filled over capacity, the final aggregate was 3–2 to Thailand.[20]

2018 FIFA World Cup Qualifiers (AFC)[edit]

Thailand national team during King's Cup 2017

The Thai team has clearly outclassed and now dominate their regional neighbours, having won the AFF Suzuki Cup and later securing first place in all regional championships: 2015 AFF U-16 Youth Championship by the U-16 team, 2015 AFF U-19 Youth Championship by the U-19 team and football at the 2015 SEA Games by the U-23 team, with only Australia as a tough opponent they could not touch on. Elasion fuelled hope for both the players and Thai fans of finally reaching the World Cup tournament. Although chances are slim, tension is mounting as the national team commence AFC's second round for World Cup qualification.[21][22] Thailand was seeded in Pot 3 (out of 5) and was drawn to be in Group F along with Iraq, Vietnam, Indonesia and Chinese Taipei (Indonesia was later excluded due to FIFA suspension). Thailand played home against visiting Vietnam on 24 May 2015 as their first World Cup Qualifiers match. Teerasil Dangda, Thailand's renowned striker, once again joined the rank of the national team after his loan with UD Almería ended earlier that year. Thai players dominated the match but were unable to score any goal. Thai defenders were caught off guard twice but were luckily saved by goalkeeper Sinthaweechai Hathairattanakool's sliding tackle both time, well outside of the penalty box. The Vietnamese "stubborn, overly aggressive" performance was rewarded by a red card to Minh Chau Nguyen when he pulled Sarach Yooyen down. Not much later, Pokklaw Anan struck from 20 yards away to give Thailand the victory goal. In a match against Chinese Taipei, Teerasil scored 2 goals in the first half giving Thailand a 2–0 win. On 9 September, Thailand played against Iraq and scored 2 late goals even the Iraqis have a 2–0 lead making the score 2–2.A month later Thailand won against Vietnam 3–0 at Hanoi making them have 10 points, the Thais then beat Chinese Taipei 4–2 at Bangkok.On 24 March 2016, Thailand drew with Iraq 2–2 at Tehran allowing them to qualify for the next round as group F winners.[23] In the last round, Kiatisuk's men faced many hard opponents, when they shared same group with Australia, Japan, Saudi Arabia, the UAE and their previous opponent, Iraq. Once again, Thailand was eliminated without winning a match in the last round, when they just recorded only two points out of ten matches.

2019 AFC Asian Cup[edit]

After the elimination from World Cup campaign, Thailand appointed Milovan Rajevac as coach, thus marked for the first time a non-Brazilian/German/English coach was head of Thailand. Milovan was appointed ahead of 2019 AFC Asian Cup.

Thailand was drawn into group A together with host UAE, Bahrain and India.

Team image[edit]

Colours[edit]

Vintage Thai team 1968 Summer Olympics shirt.

In older days the kit consisted of a red jersey, red shorts and red socks.

The Thai senior national team used to play with a kit made by local provider FBT. This contract lasted until June 2007.[24] (However, FBT were still kit providers for the U-23 team until Grand Sport took over in 2012.)

In July 2007, Nike became kit providers, and from October that year, the team played in an all-yellow home kit in honour of King Bhumibol Adulyadej's 80th birthday (yellow being the royal color), having used two other yellow kits in friendlies against China on 16 May 2007[25] and Qatar on 2 July 2007.[26]

From October 2012 through 2016, Nike was replaced by Grand Sport in a deal worth 96M baht (3.1M USD).[27] The new home kit of Thailand reverted to all-red and the away kit to all-blue. However, the order was reversed from the 2014 AFF Championship.

In September 2016, the Thai national team signed a four-year contract with Warrix Sports to be their kit kit provider from 2017 until 2020.[28]

On 4 January 2017, Warrix introduced a new Thailand home and away kit. The home kit was all black and the away kit was all white, honouring their late King Bhumibol for a year after his passing, with black and white being the traditional Thai colors of mourning.[29]

In March 2018, Warrix released an all-blue first kit, an all-red second kit, and a white-black third kit.[30]

Thailand national football team kits
Year Outfitter Kits
2002–2007 Thailand FBT
  • 2002 (Home - Away)
  • 2003–04 (Home - Away)
  • 2004–05 (Home - Away)
  • 2006–07 (Home - Away)
2007–2012 United States Nike
  • 2007 (Home)
  • 2007 Asian Cup (Home - Away)
  • 2007–08 (Third)
  • 2008–10 (Home - Away)
  • 2010–12 (Home - Away)
2012–2016 Thailand Grand Sport
  • 2012–14 (Home - Away)
  • 2014–16 (Home - Away)
  • 2016 King's Cup
  • 2016 (Home - Away)
2017–present Thailand Warrix
  • 2017 (Home - Away)
  • 2018–present (Home - Away - Third)

Home stadiums[edit]

The Thailand national football team play most of their home matches in Rajamangala National Stadium in Bang Kapi District of Bangkok. Built for the 1998 Asian Games, the stadium is the largest sporting facility in Thailand with a capacity of 49,749, all seated. International matches are also occasionally played at Supachalasai Stadium, 700th Anniversary Stadium, 80th Birthday Stadium, Chang Arena, and SCG Stadium, etc.

Thailand national football team home stadiums
Image Stadium Capacity Location Last match
RajamangalaStadium.jpg Rajamangala Stadium 49,722 Bang Kapi, Bangkok v   Indonesia
(17 November 2018; 2018 AFF Championship)
FC Suphamburi Stadium.jpg Suphan Buri Provincial Stadium 15,000 Mueang, Suphan Buri v   Trinidad and Tobago
(14 October 2018; Friendly match)
ScG Stadium.jpg SCG Stadium 15,000 Pak Kret, Nonthaburi v   Kenya
(8 October 2017; Friendly match)
Suphachalasai Stadium 2015.jpg Supachalasai Stadium 19,793 Pathum Wan, Bangkok v   South Korea
(27 March 2016; Friendly match)
Korat v Thailand XI.JPG 80th Birthday Stadium 20,141 Mueang, Nakhon Ratchasima v   Singapore
(26 March 2015; Friendly match)
700th Anniversary Stadium.jpg 700th Anniversary Stadium 25,000 Mueang, Chiang Mai v   North Korea
(26 January 2013; 2013 King's Cup)
Isan, Mueang Buri Ram District, Buri Ram 31000, Thailand - panoramio (6).jpg Chang Arena 32,600 Mueang, Buriram v   Palestine
(23 July 2011; 2014 World Cup Qualifiers)
ASEAN Cup 2008.JPG Surakul Stadium 15,000 Mueang, Phuket v   Denmark
(23 January 2009; 2009 King's Cup)
Tinsulanonstadium2014.jpg Tinsulanon Stadium 45,000 Mueang, Songkhla v   China PR
(19 December 1998; 1998 Asian Games)

Media coverage[edit]

Thailand fixtures are broadcast by Thairath TV (for friendlies and round 2 of FIFA World Cup - AFC qualification matches) and Channel 7 (for the AFF Suzuki Cup, possible round 3 of FIFA World Cup - AFC qualification, and possible AFC Asian Cup matches, due to broadcasting contract with Lagardère Sports and Entertainment).

Results and fixtures[edit]

All time results[edit]

  Win   Draw   Loss

2018[edit]

2019[edit]

Coaching staff[edit]

Position Name
Head Coach Serbia Milovan Rajevac
Assistant Coach Serbia Milovan Zecervic
Assistant Coach Thailand Sirisak Yodyardthai
Interpreter Serbia Nenad Glišić
Interpreter Thailand San Torsricharoen
Goalkeeping Coach Serbia Saša Todić
Physical Trainer Serbia Nebojša Stamenković

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The final squad was announced on 5 November 2018 for 2018 AFF Championship.[31]
Caps and goals are accurate as of 17 November 2018 after the match against Indonesia.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Chatchai Budprom (1987-02-04) 4 February 1987 (age 31) 3 0 Thailand Bangkok Glass
23 1GK Siwarak Tedsungnoen (1984-04-20) 20 April 1984 (age 34) 13 0 Thailand Buriram United
31 1GK Saranon Anuin (1994-03-24) 24 March 1994 (age 24) 0 0 Thailand Chiangrai United

4 2DF Chalermpong Kerdkaew (Captain) (1986-11-07) 7 November 1986 (age 32) 12 0 Thailand Nakhon Ratchasima
5 2DF Mika Chunuonsee (1989-03-26) 26 March 1989 (age 29) 2 0 Thailand Bangkok United
6 2DF Pansa Hemviboon (1990-07-08) 8 July 1990 (age 28) 11 2 Thailand Buriram United
13 2DF Philip Roller (1994-06-10) 10 June 1994 (age 24) 8 1 Thailand Ratchaburi Mitr Phol
15 2DF Suphan Thongsong (1994-08-26) 26 August 1994 (age 24) 2 0 Thailand Suphanburi
19 2DF Kevin Deeromram (1997-09-11) 11 September 1997 (age 21) 1 0 Thailand Port
24 2DF Korrakot Wiriyaudomsiri (1988-01-19) 19 January 1988 (age 30) 6 1 Thailand Buriram United

7 3MF Sumanya Purisai (1986-12-05) 5 December 1986 (age 31) 17 0 Thailand Bangkok United
8 3MF Thitipan Puangchan (Vice-Captain) (1993-09-01) 1 September 1993 (age 25) 20 5 Thailand Bangkok Glass
11 3MF Mongkol Tossakrai (1987-09-05) 5 September 1987 (age 31) 39 10 Thailand Police Tero
14 3MF Nurul Sriyankem (1992-02-08) 8 February 1992 (age 26) 13 0 Thailand Port
16 3MF Sasalak Haiprakhon (1996-01-08) 8 January 1996 (age 22) 3 0 Thailand Buriram United
17 3MF Tanaboon Kesarat (3rd-Captain) (1993-09-21) 21 September 1993 (age 25) 36 1 Thailand Bangkok Glass
21 3MF Pokklaw Anan (1991-03-04) 4 March 1991 (age 27) 36 6 Thailand Bangkok United
25 3MF Pakorn Prempak (1993-02-02) 2 February 1993 (age 25) 4 0 Thailand Port
29 3MF Sanrawat Dechmitr (1989-08-03) 3 August 1989 (age 29) 23 0 Thailand Bangkok United

2 4FW Chananan Pombuppha (1992-03-17) 17 March 1992 (age 26) 5 0 Thailand Suphanburi
9 4FW Adisak Kraisorn (1991-02-01) 1 February 1991 (age 27) 29 15 Thailand Muangthong United
22 4FW Supachai Jaided (1998-12-01) 1 December 1998 (age 19) 4 1 Thailand Buriram United

Recent call-ups[edit]

The following players have also been called up to the Thailand squad within the last 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Kwanchai Suklom (1995-01-12) 12 January 1995 (age 23) 0 0 Thailand Prachuap 2018 AFF Championship PRE
GK Sinthaweechai Hathairattanakool (1982-03-23) 23 March 1982 (age 36) 79 0 Thailand Suphanburi v.  Trinidad and Tobago, 14 October 2018 RET
GK Worawut Srisupha (1992-05-25) 25 May 1992 (age 26) 0 0 Thailand Port v.  Hong Kong, 11 October 2018
GK Kawin Thamsatchanan (1990-01-26) 26 January 1990 (age 28) 64 0 Belgium OH Leuven v.  China PR, 2 June 2018

DF Manuel Bihr (1993-09-17) 17 September 1993 (age 25) 4 0 Thailand Bangkok United 2018 AFF Championship INJ
DF Marco Ballini (1998-06-12) 12 June 1998 (age 20) 0 0 Thailand Chainat Hornbill 2018 AFF Championship PRE
DF Theerathon Bunmathan (1990-02-06) 6 February 1990 (age 28) 52 5 Japan Vissel Kobe v.  Trinidad and Tobago, 14 October 2018
DF Peerapat Notchaiya (1993-02-04) 4 February 1993 (age 25) 28 1 Thailand Bangkok United v.  China PR, 2 June 2018
DF Adisorn Promrak (1993-10-21) 21 October 1993 (age 25) 25 0 Thailand Muangthong United v.  China PR, 2 June 2018
DF Shinnaphat Leeaoh (1997-02-02) 2 February 1997 (age 21) 0 0 Thailand Chiangrai United 2018 King's Cup
DF Nitipong Selanon (1993-05-25) 25 May 1993 (age 25) 0 0 Thailand Port 2018 King's Cup
DF Narubadin Weerawatnodom (1994-07-12) 12 July 1994 (age 24) 24 0 Thailand Buriram United 2018 King's Cup INJ

MF Anon Amornlerdsak (1997-11-06) 6 November 1997 (age 21) 2 0 Thailand Bangkok United 2018 AFF Championship PRE
MF Ratthanakorn Maikami (1998-01-07) 7 January 1998 (age 20) 0 0 Thailand Buriram United 2018 AFF Championship PRE
MF Chanathip Songkrasin (1993-10-05) 5 October 1993 (age 25) 46 5 Japan Consadole Sapporo v.  Trinidad and Tobago, 14 October 2018
MF Sarach Yooyen (1992-05-30) 30 May 1992 (age 26) 36 0 Thailand Muangthong United v.  China PR, 2 June 2018
MF Jakkaphan Kaewprom (1988-05-24) 24 May 1988 (age 30) 21 2 Thailand Buriram United v.  China PR, 2 June 2018
MF Charyl Chappuis (1992-01-12) 12 January 1992 (age 26) 20 5 Thailand Muangthong United v.  China PR, 2 June 2018
MF Bordin Phala (1994-12-20) 20 December 1994 (age 23) 6 0 Thailand Port v.  China PR, 2 June 2018
MF Nopphon Ponkam (1996-07-19) 19 July 1996 (age 22) 0 0 Thailand Police Tero v.  China PR, 2 June 2018 PRE
MF Supachok Sarachat (1998-05-22) 22 May 1998 (age 20) 1 0 Thailand Buriram United 2018 King's Cup

FW Teerasil Dangda (1988-06-06) 6 June 1988 (age 30) 95 42 Japan Sanfrecce Hiroshima v.  Trinidad and Tobago, 14 October 2018
FW Siroch Chatthong (1992-12-08) 8 December 1992 (age 25) 24 3 Thailand PT Prachuap v.  China PR, 2 June 2018
FW Chenrop Samphaodi (1995-06-02) 2 June 1995 (age 23) 1 0 Thailand Muangthong United v.  China PR, 2 June 2018 INJ
FW Supot Jodjam (1990-03-02) 2 March 1990 (age 28) 1 0 Thailand PT Prachuap 2018 King's Cup

Notes:

  • INJ Withdrew from squad due to injury
  • PRE Preliminary squad
  • SUS Suspended
  • RET Retired from the national team
  • WD Player withdrew from the squad for non-injury related reasons

Previous squads[edit]

Head coaches[edit]

Thailand national football team head coaches
Name Country Period Honours
Bunchoo Samutkojon  Thailand 1956–1964 1956 Summer Olympics – First round
1959 Southeast Asian Peninsular GamesSilver medalist Silver medal
1961 Southeast Asian Peninsular GamesBronze medalist Bronze medal
Pratiab Thesvisarn  Thailand 1965–1968 1965 Southeast Asian Peninsular GamesGold Medalist Gold medal
1967 Southeast Asian Peninsular GamesBronze medalist Bronze medal
Günther Glomb  Germany 1968–1975 1968 Summer Olympics – Group stage
1969 Southeast Asian Peninsular GamesSilver medalist Silver medal
1971 Southeast Asian Peninsular GamesBronze medalist Bronze medal
1972 AFC Asian CupThird place
Naowarat Patanon  Thailand 1975 1975 Southeast Asian Peninsular GamesGold medalist Gold medal
Peter Schnittger  Germany 1976–1978 1977 Southeast Asian GamesSilver medalist Silver medal
Werner Bickelhaupt  Germany 1979 1979 Southeast Asian GamesBronze medalist Bronze medal
Vichit Yamboonraung  Thailand 1979 1979 King's CupWinners
Supakit Meelarpkit  Thailand 1980 1980 King's CupWinners
Prawit Chaisam  Thailand 1981–1983 1981 King's CupWinners
1981 Southeast Asian GamesGold medalist Gold medal
1982 King's CupWinners
Yanyong Na Nongkhai  Thailand 1983 1983 Southeast Asian GamesGold medalist Gold medal
Saner Chaiyong  Thailand 1984 1984 King's CupWinners
Burkhard Ziese  Germany 1985–1986 1985 Southeast Asian GamesGold medalist Gold medal
Chirtsak Chaiyaboot  Thailand 1987 1987 Southeast Asian GamesBronze medalist Bronze medal
Prawit Chaisam  Thailand 1988–1989 1989 King's CupWinners
Carlos Roberto  Brazil 1989–1991 Four Nations in Indochina – Winners
1990 King's CupWinners
1990 Asian Games – Fourth place
1991 Southeast Asian GamesSilver medalist Silver medal
Peter Stubbe  Germany 1991–1994 1992 King's CupWinners
1992 AFC Asian Cup – Group stage
1993 Southeast Asian GamesGold medalist Gold medal
Worawit Sumpachanyasathit  Thailand 1994 1994 Independence CupWinners
Chatchai Paholpat  Thailand 1994–1995 1994 King's CupWinners
1995 Southeast Asian GamesGold medalist Gold medal
Thawatchai Sartjakul  Thailand 1996 1996 AFF ChampionshipWinners
Arjhan Srong-ngamsub  Thailand 1996 1996 AFC Asian Cup – Group stage
Dettmar Cramer  Germany 1997
Witthaya Laohakul  Thailand 1997–1998 1997 Southeast Asian GamesGold medalist Gold medal
1998 AFF Championship – Fourth place
Peter Withe  England 1998–2003 1998 Asian Games – Fourth place
1999 Southeast Asian GamesGold medalist Gold medal
2000 King's CupWinners
2000 AFC Asian Cup – Group stage
2000 AFF ChampionshipWinners
2002 AFF ChampionshipWinners
Carlos Roberto  Brazil 2003–2004
Chatchai Paholpat  Thailand 2004 2004 AFC Asian Cup – Group stage
Sigfried Held  Germany 2004 2004 AFF Championship – Group stage
Charnwit Polcheewin  Thailand 2005–2008 2006 King's CupWinners
2007 AFF ChampionshipRunner-up
2007 AFC Asian Cup – Group stage
2007 King's CupWinners
Peter Reid  England 2008–2009 2008 AFF ChampionshipRunner-up
Bryan Robson  England 2009–2011 2010 AFF Championship – Group stage
Winfried Schäfer  Germany 2011–2013 2012 AFF ChampionshipRunner-up
Surachai Jaturapattarapong  Thailand 2013
Kiatisuk Senamuang  Thailand 2014–2017 2014 AFF ChampionshipWinners
2015 King's CupRunner-up
2016 King's CupWinners
2016 AFF ChampionshipWinners
Milovan Rajevac  Serbia 2017– 2017 King's CupWinners
2018 King's CupRunner-up

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA World Cup[edit]

FIFA World Cup finals record Qualifications record
Year Host country Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D L GS GA
1930  Uruguay Did not enter Did not enter
1934  Italy
1938  France
1950  Brazil
1954   Switzerland
1958  Sweden
1962  Chile
1966  England
1970  Mexico
1974  West Germany Did not qualify 4 0 0 4 0 13
1978  Argentina 4 1 0 3 8 12
1982  Spain 3 0 1 2 3 13
1986  Mexico 6 1 2 3 4 4
1990  Italy 6 1 0 5 2 14
1994  United States 8 4 0 4 13 7
1998  France 4 1 1 2 5 6
2002  South Korea
 Japan
14 5 5 4 25 20
2006  Germany 6 2 1 3 9 10
2010  South Africa 10 3 2 5 20 17
2014  Brazil 8 2 2 4 7 10
2018  Russia 16 4 4 8 20 30
2022  Qatar To be determined
2026  Canada
 Mexico
 United States
To be determined
Total 0/23 - - - - - - 89 24 18 47 116 156
Note
  • * : Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Olympic Games[edit]

Olympic Games finals record Qualifications record
Year Host country Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D L GS GA
1900  France Did not enter Did not enter
1904  United States
1908  Great Britain
1912  Sweden
1920  Belgium
1924  France
1928  Netherlands
1936  Germany
1948  Great Britain
1952  Finland
1956  Australia First round 11th 1 0 0 1 0 9 Bye
1960  Italy First round qualification 2 0 0 2 2 6
1964  Japan Second round qualification 4 2 0 2 4 10
1968  Mexico First round 16th 3 0 0 3 1 19 4 3 0 1 5 6
1972  West Germany Final round qualification 6 1 2 3 5 12
1976  Canada Did not enter Did not enter
1980  Soviet Union
1984  United States Second round qualification 10 5 2 3 13 8
1988  South Korea Second round qualification 8 3 2 3 8 7
1992 to present1 See Thailand national under-23 team See Thailand national under-23 team
Total 2/19 Best: 11th 4 0 0 4 1 28 33 14 6 14 37 49
Note
Olympic Games history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
Australia 1956 Round 1 26 November  Great Britain L 0–9 Melbourne Cricket Ground, Melbourne
Mexico 1968 Round 1 14 October  Bulgaria L 0–7 Estadio Jalisco, Guadalajara
16 October  Guatemala L 1–4 Estadio Nou Camp, León
18 October  Czechoslovakia L 0–8 Estadio Jalisco, Guadalajara

AFC Asian Cup[edit]

AFC Asian Cup finals record AFC Asian Cup qualification
Year Host country Result Position GP W D* L GS GA GP W D* L GS GA
1956  Hong Kong Withdrew Withdrew
1960  South Korea
1964  Israel Did not qualify 4 2 0 2 5 4
1968  Iran Did not qualify 4 2 0 2 5 4
1972  Thailand Third place 3rd 5 0 3 2 6 9 5 3 1 1 16 4
1976  Iran Withdrew after qualified 4 3 0 1 8 2
1980  Kuwait Did not qualify 5 3 0 2 11 3
1984  Singapore Did not qualify 5 3 0 2 9 10
1988  Qatar Did not qualify 5 1 2 2 5 12
1992  Japan First round 7th 3 0 2 1 1 5 2 2 0 0 3 1
1996  United Arab Emirates First round 12th 3 0 0 3 2 13 6 4 2 0 31 5
2000  Lebanon First round 9th 3 0 2 1 2 4 6 4 1 1 13 8
2004  China First round 16th 3 0 0 3 1 9 6 3 0 3 10 7
2007  Indonesia
 Malaysia
 Thailand
 Vietnam
First round 10th 3 1 1 1 3 5 Qualified as co-host
2011  Qatar Did not qualify 6 1 3 2 3 3
2015  Australia Did not qualify 6 0 0 6 7 21
2019  United Arab Emirates Qualified To be determined 6 4 2 0 14 6
Total 7/17 Best: 3rd 20 1 8 11 15 45 61 30 10 21 119 82
Note
  • * : Denotes draws including knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
AFC Asian Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
Thailand
1972
Group allocation 8 May  Kuwait L 0–2 National Stadium, Bangkok
Group stage 11 May  Iraq D 1–1
13 May  Iran L 0–3
Semi-finals 17 May  South Korea D 1(1) – 1(2)
Third place match 19 May  Khmer Republic D 2(5) – 2(3)
Japan
1992
First round 29 October  Qatar D 1–1 Hiroshima Big Arch, Hiroshima
31 October  China PR D 0–0 Hiroshima Stadium, Hiroshima
2 November  Saudi Arabia L 0–4 Bingo Sports Park, Onomichi
United Arab Emirates
1996
First round 5 December  Saudi Arabia L 0–6 Al-Maktoum Stadium, Dubai
8 December  Iran L 1–3
11 December  Iraq L 1–4
Lebanon
2000
First round 12 October  Iraq L 0–2 Saida International Stadium, Sidon
15 October  Iran D 1–1 Sports City Stadium, Beirut
18 October  Lebanon D 1–1 Saida International Stadium, Sidon
China
2004
First round 20 July  Iran L 0–3 Olympic Sports Center, Chongqing
24 July  Japan L 1–4
28 July  Oman L 0–2 Sichuan Longquanyi Stadium, Chengdu
Indonesia
Malaysia
Thailand
Vietnam
2007
First round 7 July  Iraq D 1–1 Rajamangala Stadium, Bangkok
12 July  Oman W 2–0
16 July  Australia L 0–4

Asian Games[edit]

AFF Championship[edit]

Southeast Asian Games[edit]

Honours[edit]

This is a list of honours for the senior Thailand national football team.

International titles[edit]

Continental titles[edit]

  • Third place (1): 1972

Regional titles[edit]

Friendly titles[edit]

  • Winners (1): 1994
  • Third place (1) : 1977*
  • Fourth place (1) : 1980
  • Winners (2): 2006, 2008
  • 3 Nations in Taiwan
  • Winners (1): 1971
  • 4 Nations in Indochina
  • Winners (1): 1989
  • Brunei Games
  • Winners (1): 1990
Note
*trophy shared

Head to head records[edit]

As of 17 November 2018.

Thailand national football team head to head records
Against From To Played Won Drawn Lost GF GA GD Confederation
 Afghanistan 2015 2015 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 AFC
 Australia 1982 2017 7 0 1 6 4 17 −13 AFC
 Bahrain 1980 2015 7 1 4 2 7 9 −2 AFC
 Bangladesh 1973 2012 14 9 3 2 29 11 +18 AFC
 Belarus 2017 2017 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 UEFA
 Bhutan 2012 2012 1 1 0 0 5 0 +5 AFC
 Brazil 2000 2000 1 0 0 1 0 7 −7 CONMEBOL
 Brunei 1971 1997 7 6 1 0 33 5 +28 AFC
 Bulgaria 1968 1996 2 0 0 2 0 13 −13 UEFA
 Cambodia 1957 1997 15 8 5 2 36 17 +19 AFC
 Cameroon 2015 2015 1 0 0 1 2 3 −1 CAF
 China PR 1975 2018 26 4 5 17 22 59 −37 AFC
 Chinese Taipei 1963 2015 9 4 1 4 16 16 0 AFC
 Czech Republic 1968 1968 1 0 0 1 0 8 −8 UEFA
 Denmark 2009 2010 2 0 1 1 2 5 −3 UEFA
 Egypt 1998 1998 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 CAF
 Estonia 2000 2004 2 1 1 0 2 1 +1 UEFA
 Finland 1996 2000 4 3 1 0 11 3 +8 UEFA
 Gabon 2018 2018 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CAF
 Germany 2004 2004 1 0 0 1 1 5 −4 UEFA
 Ghana 1982 1983 2 0 0 2 2 6 −4 CAF
 Guatemala 1968 1968 1 0 0 1 1 4 −3 CONCACAF
 Hong Kong 1961 2018 26 9 6 11 39 33 +6 AFC
 India 1962 2010 21 11 6 4 36 21 +15 AFC
 Indonesia 1957 2018 67 32 17 18 116 80 +36 AFC
 Iran 1972 2013 14 0 3 11 5 32 −27 AFC
 Iraq 1972 2017 17 2 5 10 18 45 −27 AFC
 Israel 1973 1973 1 0 0 1 0 6 −6 UEFA
 Japan 1962 2017 19 1 3 15 11 49 −38 AFC
 Jordan 2004 2016 7 1 5 1 4 3 +1 AFC
 Kazakhstan 1998 2006 4 2 2 0 5 3 +2 UEFA
 Kenya 1990 2017 2 2 0 0 3 1 +2 CAF
 Kuwait 1972 2014 12 4 1 7 18 30 −12 AFC
 Kyrgyzstan 2001 2001 1 1 0 0 3 1 +2 AFC
 Laos 1961 2010 12 10 1 1 45 14 +31 AFC
 Latvia 2005 2005 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 UEFA
 Lebanon 1998 2014 7 3 2 2 12 15 −3 AFC
 Liberia 1984 1984 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 CAF
 Libya 1977 1977 1 0 1 0 2 2 0 CAF
 Liechtenstein 1981 1981 1 1 0 0 2 0 +2 UEFA
 Luxembourg 1980 1980 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 UEFA
 Macau 2007 2007 2 2 0 0 13 2 +11 AFC
 Malaysia 1959 2014 94 29 29 36 133 136 −3 AFC
 Maldives 1996 2012 3 3 0 0 19 0 +19 AFC
 Malta 1981 1981 1 0 0 1 0 2 −2 UEFA
 Morocco 1980 1980 1 0 0 1 1 2 −1 CAF
 Myanmar 1957 2017 48 20 14 14 89 62 +27 AFC
   Nepal 1982 2008 3 3 0 0 12 1 +11 AFC
 Netherlands 2007 2007 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 UEFA
 New Zealand 1976 2014 5 2 2 1 9 7 +2 OFC
 Nigeria 1983 1983 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 CAF
 Northern Ireland 1997 1997 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 UEFA
 North Korea 1978 2017 20 5 4 11 18 32 −14 AFC
 Norway 1965 2012 2 0 0 2 0 8 −8 UEFA
 Oman 1986 2012 9 4 1 4 10 7 +3 AFC
 Pakistan 1960 2001 5 4 0 1 16 7 +9 AFC
 Palestine 2011 2011 2 1 1 0 3 2 +1 AFC
 Papua New Guinea 1984 1984 1 0 0 1 1 4 −3 OFC
 Philippines 1971 2016 20 17 1 2 64 9 +55 AFC
 Poland 2010 2010 1 0 0 1 1 3 −2 UEFA
 Qatar 1992 2016 11 4 3 4 15 15 0 AFC
 Saudi Arabia 1982 2017 16 1 1 14 9 42 −33 AFC
 Singapore 1957 2016 61 32 17 12 104 62 +42 AFC
 Slovakia 2004 2018 2 0 1 1 3 4 –1 UEFA
 South Africa 2010 2010 1 0 0 1 0 4 −4 CAF
 South Korea 1961 2016 61 8 12 41 43 120 −77 AFC
 Sri Lanka 1979 2001 5 5 0 0 15 2 +13 AFC
 Sweden 1962 2003 5 0 1 4 4 13 −9 UEFA
 Syria 1978 2016 5 3 2 0 12 7 +5 AFC
 Tajikistan 2003 2003 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 AFC
 Timor-Leste 2018 2018 1 1 0 0 7 0 +7 AFC
 Trinidad and Tobago 2003 2018 2 2 0 0 4 2 +2 CONCACAF
 Turkmenistan 1998 1998 1 0 1 0 3 3 0 AFC
 United Arab Emirates 1986 2017 9 1 2 6 8 14 −6 AFC
 United States 1987 1987 1 0 0 1 0 1 −1 CONCACAF
 Uzbekistan 1994 2017 8 5 0 3 18 15 +3 AFC
 Vietnam 1957 2015 21 14 4 3 41 17 +24 AFC
 Yemen 1988 2007 6 2 4 0 9 5 +4 AFC
78 Countries 1948 2018 776 288 183 305 1190 1171 +19 All
Last match updated was against  Indonesia Indonesia on 17 November 2018.

Statistics[edit]

FIFA world rankings[edit]

Thailand's FIFA world rankings
Year Rank Games
Played
Won Drawn Lost Best Worst
Rank Move Rank Move
1993 69 19 10 2 7 66 Increase +9 69 Decrease –1
1994 85 4 0 1 3 67 Increase +2 85 Decrease –8
1995 77 8 6 1 1 77 Increase +26 103 Decrease –19
1996 57 18 11 3 4 50 Increase +11 72 Decrease –4
1997 54 16 7 6 3 54 Increase +8 70 Decrease –4
1998 45 20 9 5 6 43 Increase +8 60 Decrease –7
1999 60 9 6 3 0 60 Increase +9 78 Decrease –25
2000 61 24 13 5 6 57 Increase +3 65 Decrease –6
2001 61 23 10 6 7 60 Increase +3 64 Decrease –1
2002 66 11 5 3 3 60 Increase +4 71 Decrease –5
2003 60 11 5 2 4 54 Increase +15 75 Decrease –9
2004 79 20 4 5 11 57 Increase +6 79 Decrease –7
2005 111 2 0 1 1 80 Increase +1 111 Decrease –8
2006 137 8 5 2 1 108 Increase +2 137 Decrease –12
2007 121 20 11 6 3 107 Increase +15 126 Decrease –8
2008 126 19 8 4 7 90 Increase +15 126 Decrease –18
2009 105 8 3 3 2 105 Increase +7 124 Decrease –3
2010 120 12 4 3 5 98 Increase +7 120 Decrease –6
2011 122 11 3 5 3 114 Increase +10 132 Decrease –18
2012 136 13 9 1 3 124 Increase +16 152 Decrease –13
2013 146 6 1 0 5 135 Increase +6 146 Decrease –5
2014 142 12 7 2 3 140 Increase +21 165 Decrease –8
2015 133 11 7 2 2 129 Increase +13 145 Decrease –11
2016 126 17 7 3 7 117 Increase +7 146 Decrease –15
2017 130 9 3 1 5 126 Increase +6 138 Decrease –7

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking". FIFA. 25 October 2018. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
  2. ^ Elo rankings change compared to one year ago. "World Football Elo Ratings". eloratings.net. 17 November 2018. Retrieved 17 November 2018.
  3. ^ "Thailand matches, ratings and points exchanged". World Football Elo Ratings: Thailand. Retrieved 24 November 2016.
  4. ^ "รำลึกดรีมทีม". thailandsusu.com. Retrieved 4 January 2017.
  5. ^ "10 อันดับ: เหตุการณ์สุดฉาวในซูซูกิคัพ". Retrieved 4 January 2017.
  6. ^ 1998 Tiger Cup Match Highlight
  7. ^ "ASEAN ("Tiger") Cup 2000 (Thailand) (Full Info)". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  8. ^ "Flashback: 2000 ASEAN Football Championship". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  9. ^ "ASEAN ("Tiger") Cup 2002 (Indonesia and Singapore)". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  10. ^ "ASEAN ("Tiger") Cup 2002 (Indonesia and Singapore)". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  11. ^ "Flashback: 2002 ASEAN Football Championship". Retrieved 23 August 2018.
  12. ^ "Bryan Robson to coach Thailand Bryan Robson has agreed to replace his former England team-mate Peter Reid as coach of Thailand". The Daily Telegraph. London. 23 September 2009. Retrieved 27 April 2010.
  13. ^ "Singapore 1-3 Thailand: Sutee Suksomkit Gives Bryan Robson Crucial Win - Goal.com". goal.com. 14 November 2009. Retrieved 4 January 2017.
  14. ^ "Bryan Robson resigns as Thailand manager". BBC Sport. 8 June 2011. Retrieved 8 June 2011.
  15. ^ "AFF Suzuki Cup: Thailand 2 Malaysia 0 (3-1 agg) - Soccerway". soccerway.com. Retrieved 4 January 2017.
  16. ^ FINAL: Thailand vs Malaysia - AFF Suzuki Cup 2014 (1st Leg) on YouTube. (See 34:28 for the player position) Retrieved on 30 August 2017.
  17. ^ "บาร์ซาเข้าสิง! ชมอีกครั้งไทยติกิ-ตาก้าต่อบอล 27 ครั้งสุดเทพ". GOAL. Bangkok. 17 December 2014.
  18. ^ "Thailand vs. Indonesia - Football Match Report - December 17, 2016 from espn.co.uk". Retrieved on 31 August 2017.
  19. ^ "Match Summary Report from aseanfootball.org" (PDF). 14 December 2016.
  20. ^ "Match Summary Report from aseanfootball.org" (PDF). 17 December 2016.
  21. ^ "Chanathip dreams of WC; Chappuis keeps promise for Thailand". ESPN FC. 20 December 2014.
  22. ^ "SE Asian champions Thailand hoping for a World Cup qualifying miracle". ESPN FC. 23 May 2015.
  23. ^ "Pokklaw strikes late to give Thailand opening World Cup qualifying win". ESPN FC. 24 May 2015.
  24. ^ "Qatar football players (in white) walk with Thai players... Pictures | Getty Images". Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  25. ^ "Thaifootball.com (Friendly Matches)". Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  26. ^ "Thailand footballers Suree Sukha (R) and... Pictures | Getty Images". Retrieved 17 June 2017.
  27. ^ "ASC2012: Thailand Go With Grand Sport - AFF - The Official Website Of The Asean Football Federation AFF – The Official Website Of The Asean Football Federation". www.aseanfootball.org.
  28. ^ PCL., Post Publishing. "Kirins eye three points from trip to Sukhothai". Retrieved 11 September 2016.
  29. ^ "Warrix Official". www.facebook.com.
  30. ^ "Thailand 2018 Home and Away Kits Released". footyheadlines.com. 13 March 2018. Retrieved 11 April 2018.
  31. ^ "ประกาศรายชื่อ 23 แข้งทีมชาติไทย ชุดลุยศึกชิงแชมป์อาเซียน 2018" [List of 23 Thai national team players for the 2018 ASEAN Championship] (in Thai). Football Association of Thailand. 9 November 2018. Retrieved 5 November 2018.
  32. ^ a b Roberto Mamrud. "Thailand – Record International Players". RSSSF. Retrieved 6 July 2016.

External links[edit]