The Ants

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The Ants
The Ants (Wilson Hölldobler book).jpg
AuthorsBert Hölldobler
E.O. Wilson
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SubjectZoology
PublishedMarch 28, 1990 (Belknap Press)
Media typePrint (Hardcover)
Pages746
ISBN0-674-04075-9
OCLC19325464
595.79/6 19
LC ClassQL568.F7 H57 1990
Followed byJourney to the Ants 

The Ants is a zoology textbook by the German entomologist Bert Hölldobler and the American entomologist E. O. Wilson, first published in 1990. It won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1991.[1]

Contents[edit]

This book is primarily aimed at academics as a reference work, detailing the ants' anatomy, physiology, social organization including their caste system, altruistic behaviour, and chemical communication with pheromones, their ecology (vital for turning the soil and controlling insect pests), and natural history.[2][3][4][5]

An account of some of Hölldobler and Wilson's most interesting findings, popularized for the layman, can be found in their 1994 book Journey to the Ants.

Reception[edit]

The Science magazine reviewer described the book as a "mighty tome" and commented that it would "surely take its place among the greatest of all entomology books", as it was "a wonderful exploration of almost every ramification of evolutionary biology, from developmental biology to the structure of ecological communities". The illustrations are praised as lavish and extremely detailed, with monochrome drawings and 24 colour plates. All the 297 extant genera are illustrated and identifiable with the supplied keys. But "The Ants, like every great book and every ant colony, is much more than the sum of its parts."[6]

Diana Wheeler, reviewing the book in The Quarterly Review of Biology, comments that William Morton Wheeler thought his book not practical to revise as it would require too much work and would make the book too expensive, and that it was fortunate that the authors "did not flinch" at the challenge. They had produced a massive but affordable volume, and it was accessible to the public as well as to entomologists.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Ants — Bert Hölldobler, Edward O. Wilson | Harvard University Press". www.hup.harvard.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-11.
  2. ^ The Drexel InterView - Archives (2011-06-15), episode 75 - E. O. Wilson and Bert Hölldobler - part 01, retrieved 2017-02-11
  3. ^ The Drexel InterView - Archives (2011-06-15), episode 75 - E. O. Wilson and Bert Hölldobler - part 02, retrieved 2017-02-11
  4. ^ The Drexel InterView - Archives (2011-06-15), episode 75 - E. O. Wilson and Bert Hölldobler - part 03, retrieved 2017-02-11
  5. ^ The Drexel InterView - Archives (2011-06-15), episode 75 - E. O. Wilson and Bert Hölldobler - part 04, retrieved 2017-02-11
  6. ^ Franks, N. R. (18 May 1990). "Book Reviews The Ants. Bert Hölldobler and Edward O. Wilson". Science. 248 (4957): 897–898. doi:10.1126/science.248.4957.897.
  7. ^ Wheeler, Diana (1991). "The Ants. Bert Holldobler, Edward O. Wilson". The Quarterly Review of Biology. 66 (2): 215–216. doi:10.1086/417191.

External links[edit]