The Be Good Tanyas

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The Be Good Tanyas
The Be Good Tanyas in 2006
The Be Good Tanyas in 2006
Background information
OriginVancouver, Canada
GenresFolk
Years active1999 (1999)–present
LabelsNettwerk, Birthday Cake
Members
Past members
Websitebegoodtanyas.com

The Be Good Tanyas are a Canadian folk music group formed in Vancouver in 1999.[1] Their influences include folk, country, and bluegrass. The style of music they perform can be referred to as alt-country or Americana.

History[edit]

The Be Good Tanyas formed in 1999 in Vancouver, British Columbia. Samantha Parton had been living on the road as a tree planter and wandering and making music, when she met Jolie Holland. The two began playing songs, including one called "Be Good Tanyas" that had been written by a friend of Hollands. When the duo was joined by a mutual friend, Trish Klein, it is said this was the beginning of the Be Good Tanyas.[2] Frazey Ford, who had been planting trees with Parton, joined and the group went on their first tour, opening for Bill Bourne.[3] Holland left the group in 2000 but did return to contribute to the first album Blue Horse.[2] In the early years of the group, Frazey Ford, Trish Klein, and Sam Parton played together at open mics and tree planting camps in the Kootenays region of British Columbia.

In 2000 they embarked on a North American tour that ran from Vancouver to New Orleans, before returning to British Columbia to record their first album Blue Horse released in 2001.[4] The album, described as a "simple yet provocative and enchanting collection of tunes", is said in the same article, to have been recorded in a "run down shack on the outskirts of Vancouver...[which]...provided the perfect home for the Tanyas to spin their charming tales into songs."[5]

The second album, Chinatown, followed in 2003. Matthew Good noted in a review of Chinatown, that the album represented the group's...[well deserved]..."unblemished reputation for interpreting traditional folk songs that and penning moving originals."[6] Their third album, Hello Love, was released on October 10, 2006, with one critic noting that "Ford's curiously breathy and intimate singing creates an immediate connection with the listener...[and]...all the music has a kitchen-porch feel punctuated by the meditative plunk of the mandolin and banjo."[7]

The Tanyas gained U.S. exposure when the Showtime series The L Word selected one of their songs, "In Spite of All the Damage", for inclusion in the series' soundtrack. A live version of "In My Time of Dying" was also included in the third episode of the third season, in which Frazey Ford was featured as a nun and played the song in the opening sequence. The song "The Littlest Birds" was played during the first season of the Showtime series Weeds and was included in that season's soundtrack. The band's music has also been included in the CTV series The Eleventh Hour and in the feature film Because of Winn-Dixie. Their cover of Townes Van Zandt's "Waiting Around to Die" was also used in "Bit by a Dead Bee", an episode of AMC's Breaking Bad. Their rendition of "What Are They Doing in Heaven?" was played on the episode "Searchers" of the AMC series Hell on Wheels.[8]

After the release of the first two Be Good Tanyas albums, Trish Klein collaborated with Alison Russell under the band name Po' Girl, a project that as of 2010 has resulted in seven albums: Po'girl, Vagabond Lullabies, B-side recordings, Home to You, Deer in the Night, Live, and Follow Your Bliss.

In 2007 all members of the band pursued their own projects.

Samantha Parton and Jolie Holland in Cambridge, England, 2017

In 2010 Frazey Ford released her debut solo album, Obadiah, an album which featured a close collaboration with Trish Klein who is credited as writer on several songs. Ford toured Obadiah with Klein and her band through Europe and North America through 2010–2011.

In 2011 it was announced the Be Good Tanyas would return to performing, beginning with an appearance at the Winnipeg Folk Festival.[9][10] Following this the band released a retrospective of their work, A Collection (2012), which featured selections from previous albums and two new songs.[11] This release saw them touring throughout North America and Europe including an appearance in San Francisco at the Outside Lands festival.[12] While there the band was invited to Grateful Dead guitarist Bob Weir's studio (Tri Studios) where they recorded and videotaped three songs.[13]

In September 2012, Parton suffered a concussion as a vehicle in which she was a passenger was struck from behind by a pickup truck.[14] Medical procedures on her head during her convalescence revealed an aneurysm behind Parton's left eye as well as a benign tumor. Parton took a leave of absence as the band continued touring North America and Europe in 2013 with fellow Vancouver musician and visual artist Caroline Ballhorn filling in.[15]

In 2014 Ford released her second solo album Indian Ocean. The album was recorded at the Hi Recording Studio in Memphis, Tennessee with various members of Al Green's original backing band, the Hi Rhythm Section, and Trish Klein contributing electric guitar on two tracks. Indian Ocean is described by one reviewer as [striking]..."a fine balance between light and dark, between elegiac, soul-lifting musicality and confessional, soul-baring lyricism."[16] Ford toured worldwide in support of Indian Ocean, and announced in 2019 her third solo album U Kin B The Sun, released the following year to critical acclaim.[17][18]

In 2016 Parton resumed touring,[19] accompanied by former band member Jolie Holland, and in September 2017 they released their long-awaited album Wildflower Blues, on Cinquefoil Records.[20]

Members[edit]

Former members[edit]

Discography[edit]

Albums[edit]

Singles[edit]

Year Single Album
2000 "The Littlest Birds" Blue Horse
2003 "It's Not Happening" Chinatown
2006 "Scattered Leaves" Hello Love

Official music videos[edit]

  • The Be Good Tanyas (October 6, 2006). It's Not Happening. NettwerkMusic. Archived from the original on December 15, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2015.
  • The Be Good Tanyas (July 2, 2007). Human Thing. NettwerkMusic. Archived from the original on December 15, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2015.
  • The Be Good Tanyas (July 27, 2010). Littlest Birds. NettwerkMusic. Archived from the original on December 15, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2015.

Other contributions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hage, Erik. "The Be Good Tanyas – Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved March 25, 2017.
  2. ^ a b McLaughlin, John P. (March 20, 2003). "Not finished her wandering". The Province. Archived from the original on September 17, 2022. Retrieved September 17, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ Keyes, Bob (April 14, 2000). "Bill Bourne a slave to the road". Argus Leader. Souix Falls, South Dakota. p. 53. Archived from the original on September 17, 2022. Retrieved September 17, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Donahoe, Emily (November 17, 2005). "Down home sound". The Independent-Record. Helena, Montana. p. 11. Archived from the original on September 15, 2022. Retrieved September 16, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ Waiser, Jessica (August 23, 2001). "Tanyas' sound evokes feelings of being on the road". The Star-Phoenix. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Archived from the original on September 16, 2022. Retrieved September 16, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  6. ^ Good, Matthew (March 11, 2003). "The Be Good Tanyas Chinatown (Nettwerk)". Times Colonist. Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. p. 17. Archived from the original on September 17, 2022. Retrieved September 17, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ Chamberlain, Adrian (November 30, 2006). "Trio's musical journey gains momentum in U.K." Time Colonist. Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. p. 46. Archived from the original on September 15, 2022. Retrieved September 16, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "The Be Good Tanyas music featured in movies, TV shows and video games". Tunefind.com. Archived from the original on June 4, 2022. Retrieved September 16, 2022.
  9. ^ "Winnipeg Folk Festival 2011 Performer Lineup". Winnipegfolkfestival.ca. Archived from the original on June 15, 2011. Retrieved June 5, 2012.
  10. ^ "Official tour dates". Begoodtanyas.com. June 1, 2012. Archived from the original on May 5, 2012. Retrieved June 5, 2012.
  11. ^ Burliuk, Greg (July 21, 2021). Murphy, Jan (ed.). "Be Good Vibrations". The Kingston Whig-Standard. p. 45. Archived from the original on September 17, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ Lipshutz, Jason (July 4, 2022). "Outside Lands 2012 Lineup: Stevie Wonder, Metallica, Neil Young Headlining". billboard. Archived from the original on September 17, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  13. ^ "The Be Good Tanyas" (Webcast performance at Bob Weir's Tri Studio). begoodtanyas.com. Archived from the original on June 10, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  14. ^ Patch, Nick (July 24, 2013). "Campaign started to aid ailing Be Good Tanyas singer Samantha Parton". The Vancouver Sun. The Canadian Press. Archived from the original on July 26, 2013. Retrieved May 29, 2015.
  15. ^ Doole, Kerry (July 24, 2013). "Being Good To The Be Good Tanyas Member". SamaritanMag.com. Archived from the original on April 18, 2021. Retrieved May 29, 2015.
  16. ^ Marchand, Francois (December 2, 2014). "Riding atop a tidal wave" (Arts & Life). The Vancouver Sun. Archived from the original on September 17, 2022. Retrieved September 18, 2022 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Petridis, Alexis (February 6, 2020). "Frazey Ford: U Kin B the Sun review – bright shoots from knotted roots of American song" (Album of the week). The Guardian. Archived from the original on February 6, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  18. ^ "FRAZEY FORD - U kin B the Sun". killbeatmusic.com. Archived from the original on July 18, 2020. Retrieved September 18, 2022.
  19. ^ "Jolie Holland and Samantha Parton (California/British Columbia)". 2016 Vancouver Folk Music Festival. April 27, 2016. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  20. ^ "Jolie Holland and Samantha Parton". Jolieandsamantha.com. Retrieved March 23, 2020.

Further reading[edit]

Interviews[edit]

Reviews[edit]

External links[edit]