The Beggar Maid (film)

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The Beggar Maid
Directed by Herbert Blaché
Produced by Lejaran A. Hiller
Isaac Wolpe
Written by Reginald Denny
Based on Tennyson poem and
Sir Edward Burne-Jones painting
Starring Reginald Denny
Mary Astor
Cinematography Lejaran A. Hiller
Production
company
Triart Picture Company
Distributed by Paramount Pictures Corporation
Release date
September 1921
Running time
2 reels
Country United States
Language Silent (English intertitles)

The Beggar Maid is a 1921 American silent drama film based on the Tennyson poem of The King and the Beggar-maid and the painting of the scene by Sir Edward Burne-Jones.[1] The feature was directed by Herbert Blaché and stars Reginald Denny and Mary Astor.[2]

Plot[edit]

This short film is the story of the youthful, idealistic Earl of Winston: an aristocrat who is hopelessly in love with the title character. She's the orphaned daughter of one of the Earls gardeners, who dutifully tends to her sick brother. Because of their different backgrounds, the Earl is unsure that a marriage will result in happiness. Will true love prevail?

Cast[edit]

Background[edit]

King Cophetua and the Beggar Maid - Edward Burne-Jones

The poem by Tennyson and the painting by Burne-Jones which were the inspiration for the film:

Her arms across her breast she laid;
 She was more fair than words can say;
 Barefooted came the beggar maid
 Before the king Cophetua.
 In robe and crown the king stept down,
 To meet and greet her on her way;
'It is no wonder,' said the lords,
'She is more beautiful than day.'

As shines the moon in clouded skies,
 She in her poor attire was seen;
 One praised her ankles, one her eyes,
 One her dark hair and lovesome mien.
 So sweet a face, such angel grace,
 In all that land had never been.
 Cophetua sware a royal oath:
'This beggar maid shall be my queen!'

by Lord Alfred Tennyson (1809-1892)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Critics Commend 'Beggar Maid' as Shown at Rivoli". Exhibitors Trade Review. 10 (19): 1319. October 1921. 
  2. ^ "The Beggar Maid". Silent Era. Retrieved March 6, 2015. 

External links[edit]