The Blues Brothers (video game)

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The Blues Brothers
The Blues Brothers video game intro screen
Intro screen of the Blues Brothers video game in IBM PC (VGA mode)
Developer(s)Titus France
Publisher(s)Titus France
Platform(s)MS-DOS, Amstrad CPC, Amiga, C64, Atari ST, NES, Game Boy
Release1991: MS-DOS, Amiga, C64, Atari ST
1992: Amstrad CPC, GB
September 1992: NES
Genre(s)Platform
Mode(s)Single-player
2-player cooperative

The Blues Brothers is a platform game based on the band The Blues Brothers, where the object is to evade police and other vigilantes to get to a blues concert. The game was released for IBM PC, Amstrad CPC, Amiga, Commodore 64, and Atari ST in 1991, and for the NES and Game Boy in 1992. It was created by Titus France. A sequel, The Blues Brothers: Jukebox Adventure, was released for the SNES in 1993 (as The Blues Brothers) and for IBM PC compatibles and the Game Boy in 1994. The theme music of the video game is an electronic arrangement of Peter Gunn. Zzap!64 ranked the Commodore 64 port the eighth-best all-time Commodore 64 game in 1993,[21] and the game was the best platformer for PC, Atari ST and Amiga consoles of 1991 of Zero journalist David Wilson.[22]

Gameplay[edit]

The characters have the ability to pick up boxes to throw them at enemies. Each level is a variation on the jumping theme, with the characters finding a necessary attribute (e.g. a guitar) somewhere in the level. The sixth and final level ends on-stage.

The game can be played by two players simultaneously, but the scrolling screen only focuses on one of them.

The game's soundtrack consists of music from the movie. Dimitris Yerasimos composed the music for all versions of the game except for the Game Boy, where Thorsten Mitschele composed the music.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In Electronic Gaming Monthly's review of the NES version, two critics gave it a 6/10 and two others a 5/10.[1]
  2. ^ GamePro gave the NES version two 2/5 scores for control and fun factor, a 3/5 for sound, and a 4/5 for graphics.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Harris, Steve; Semrad, Ed; Alessi, Martin; Sushi-X (May 1992). "Blues Brothers". Electronic Gaming Monthly. Vol. 5, no. 5. p. 24.
  2. ^ Poole, Michael (February 1993). "The Blues Brother". Game Players Nintendo Guide. Vol. 6, no. 2. p. 61.
  3. ^ Slasher Quan (June 1992). "The Blues Brother". GamePro. No. 35. p. 40.
  4. ^ McCarthy, Patrick (October 1992). "The Blues Brothers". Game Zone. No. 12. pp. 54–55.
  5. ^ Swan, Gus; Radion Automatic (October 1992). "Blues Brother". Nintendo Magazine System. No. 1. pp. 88–90.
  6. ^ James (October 1992). "The Blues Brothers". Total!. No. 10. pp. 76–77.
  7. ^ Andy (December 1992). "Blues Brothers". Total!. No. 12. p. 113. Retrieved August 26, 2021.
  8. ^ Walker, Brent (June 1992). "The Blues Brothers". VideoGames & Computer Entertainment. No. 41. pp. 42–43.
  9. ^ "The Blues Brothers". GB Action. No. 4. September 1992. pp. 22–24.
  10. ^ "The Blues Brothers". N-Force. No. 3. September 1992. p. 30.
  11. ^ "The Blues Brothers". N-Force. No. 8. February 1993. p. 38.
  12. ^ Campbell, Stuart (November 1991). "The Blues Brothers". Amiga Power. No. 7. pp. 46–47.
  13. ^ Adam P (April 1992). "The Blues Brothers". Amstrad Action. No. 79. pp. 30–31.
  14. ^ Masterson, Man (January 1992). "The Blues Brothers". Commodore Format. No. 16. pp. 36–37.
  15. ^ "The Blue Brothers". Commodore Power. No. 2. February 1992. pp. 22–23.
  16. ^ Nick (9 October 1991). "The Blues Brothers". Games-X. No. 24. pp. 16–17.
  17. ^ "The Blues Brothers". New Computer Express. No. 153. 12 October 1991. p. 61.
  18. ^ Presley, Paul (November 1991). "The Blues Brothers". The One. No. 38. pp. 86–87.
  19. ^ Leach, James (December 1991). "The Blues Brothers". ST Format. No. 29. p. 75.
  20. ^ "The Blues Brother". Zzap!64. No. 81. February 1992. pp. 54–57.
  21. ^ "Top Ton!". Zzap!64. No. 11. Autumn 1993. p. 33.
  22. ^ "Games of the Year". Zero. No. 27. January 1992. p. 25.

External links[edit]