The Bodyguard (2004 film)

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The Bodyguard
Bodyguardmumjokmok.jpg
The cover to the Thailand DVD release of the film.
Directed by Panna Rittikrai
Petchtai Wongkamlao
Produced by Somsak Techaratanaprasert
Written by Petchtai Wongkamlao
Starring Petchtai Wongkamlao,
Pumwaree Yodkamol,
Piphat Apiraktanakorn,
Tony Jaa
Cinematography Nattawut Kittikhun
Edited by Thawat Sermsuwittayawong
Distributed by Sahamongkol Film International
Release date
January 21, 2004 (Thailand)
Running time
95 min.
Country Thailand
Language Thai

The Bodyguard (Thai: บอดี้การ์ดหน้าเหลี่ยม) is a 2004 wire fu action-comedy written and directed by Thai comedian and actor Petchtai Wongkamlao and featuring martial-arts choreography by Panna Ritikrai. It is followed by the 2007 sequel, The Bodyguard 2.

Plot[edit]

After a shootout with dozens of assassins, Wong Kom, bodyguard to Chot Petchpantakarn, the wealthiest man in Asia, finds his subject killed.

Chaichol, the son and heir to the family fortune, fires the bodyguard and takes it upon himself to find the killers. He's then ambushed, and the rest of the bodyguard team is wiped out. Chaichol, however, comes out of it alive, and finds himself in a Bangkok slum, living with a volunteer car-accident rescue squad and falling in love with tomboyish Pok.

Meanwhile, Wong Kom is working to clear his name, and stay ahead of the chief villain and his bumbling gang of henchmen.

Cast[edit]

Casting notes[edit]

  • Petchtai Wongkamlao, a popular Thai comedian, plays the straight man.
  • Some of the film's promotional materials imply that this followup to Ong-Bak: Muay Thai Warrior starring Tony Jaa. In fact, Tony only has a small (but still memorable) role as an anonymous fighter in a supermarket.
  • In addition to Tony Jaa, dozens of Thai celebrities, including sports figures, comedians and musicians, have roles and cameos on the film. Among them are:

Awards and nominations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chao Kokaew Prakaykavil na Chiang Mai passes away in Bangkok, Chiang Mai Mail, March 190-25, 2005.

External links[edit]