The Boy Who Drank Too Much

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The Boy Who Drank Too Much
The Boy Who Drank Too Much-1980.jpg
Genre Drama
Family
Sport
Written by Edward DeBlasio
Shep Greene (novel)
Directed by Jerrold Freedman
Starring Scott Baio
Lance Kerwin
Ed Lauter
Mariclare Costello
Music by Michael Small
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
Production
Executive producer(s) Jerry McNeely
Producer(s) Donald A. Baer
Shep Greene (associate producer)
Cinematography Allen Daviau
Editor(s) Anthony Redman
Running time 99 min
Production company(s) Company Four
MTM Enterprises
Distributor CBS
Release
Original network CBS
Original release
  • February 6, 1980 (1980-02-06)

The Boy Who Drank Too Much is a 1980 American made-for-television drama film based on a novel by Shep Greene. The film was initially broadcast on CBS and sponsored by Xerox, and starred Scott Baio as a high school hockey player struggling with alcoholism. While its approach is that of a typical after school special, the film was presented as a prime time made-for-TV movie,[1] which was seen February 6, 1980 at 9:00 pm ET/PT.[2] Taking a form of a 20th-century morality play, the film dealt with a serious issue of alcoholism, that might confront youth in a prescriptive manner.

Plot[edit]

Baio stars as Buff Saunders, a teen hockey player well-liked and respected among his coaches and teammates. He battles to hide the truth from his elders and peers that, like his father, he is an alcoholic. He struggles to remain clean and sober in order not to lose his position on the team and the respect of his friends.

Cast[edit]

  • Scott Baio.....Buff Saunders
  • Lance Kerwin.....Billy Carpenter
  • Ed Lauter.....Gus Carpenter
  • Mariclare Costello.....Louis Carpenter
  • Stephen Davies.....Alan
  • Toni Kalem.....Tina
  • Katherine Pass.....Donna Watson
  • Dan Shor.....Art 'Artie' Collins
  • Michele Tobin.....Julie
  • Don Murray.....Ken Saunders

Production[edit]

Filming for the movie took place in Los Angeles, California and Madison, Wisconsin.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Globe and Mail, Tuesday February 5, 1980, p. 17, Toronto
  2. ^ Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Wednesday February 6, 1980, p. 6-C, Sarasota, FL

External links[edit]