The Brothers Wilderness

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The Brothers Wilderness
IUCN category Ib (wilderness area)
OlympicMountainsNearHoodCanal.jpg
East face of The Brothers in winter
Map showing the location of The Brothers Wilderness
Map showing the location of The Brothers Wilderness
Location Jefferson County, Washington, USA
Nearest city Quilcene, WA
Coordinates 47°41′55″N 123°05′33″W / 47.69861°N 123.09250°W / 47.69861; -123.09250Coordinates: 47°41′55″N 123°05′33″W / 47.69861°N 123.09250°W / 47.69861; -123.09250
Area 16,337 acres (6,611 ha)
Established 1984
Governing body U.S. Forest Service
The Brothers Wilderness

The Brothers Wilderness is a designated wilderness area located in the Olympic National Forest on the eastern side of the Olympic Peninsula south of Buckhorn Wilderness and north of Mount Skokomish Wilderness.[1] The wilderness area comprises 16,337 acres (6,611 ha) administered by the U.S. Forest Service.[2] The wilderness is named after The Brothers peaks, which are the tallest in the wilderness area at 6,866 feet (2,093 m). The Duckabush River flows through the middle of the area. The area lies in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, receiving about 80 inches (2,000 mm) of annual precipitation.[2]

History[edit]

In 1984, the U.S. Congress established five wilderness areas within Olympic National Forest:[3]

The Brothers Wilderness sits along the eastern flank of the Olympic Wilderness, which was created in 1988.

Recreation[edit]

Multiple trails can be used to reach The Brothers Wilderness for backpacking, mountain climbing, hunting, hiking, camping, and fishing. The three-mile Brothers Trail provides access to climbing routes up the double-summit peak of the same name. The Duckabush Trail follows the Duckabush River and then enters Olympic National Park. The eight-mile Mt. Jupiter Trail #809 is ranked as difficult and provides access to Jupiter Lakes.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Brothers Wilderness". Olympic National Forest. U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "The Brothers Wilderness". Wilderness.net. University of Montana. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 
  3. ^ "Special Places". Olympic National Forest. U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 
  4. ^ "Recreation Opportunity Guide Olympic National Forest: The Brothers Wilderness" (PDF). U.S. Forest Service. Retrieved March 17, 2015. 

External links[edit]