Carsey School of Public Policy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from The Carsey Institute)
Jump to: navigation, search

The Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire is a nationally acclaimed resource for research, leadership development, and engaged scholarship relevant to public policy. It is located on the campus of the University of New Hampshire in Durham, New Hampshire, United States. It opened its doors in 2004 as the Carsey Institute, with a focus on policy and applied research in the areas of families, community and poverty in America, and has grown to cover families and sustainable development not only in New Hampshire and across the United States but also around the world.

The school addresses the most pressing challenges of the twenty-first century, striving for innovative, responsive, and equitable solutions at all levels of government and in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors.

In 2014, the University of New Hampshire received a generous gift from Marcy Carsey '66, and the Carsey Institute transitioned into the Carsey School of Public Policy, offering an expanded range of degree and non-degree programs.

Mission[edit]

The school's mission statement reads:

"The mission of the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire is to provide top quality research, leadership development, and engaged scholarship relevant to public policy. Our goal is to address the most pressing challenges of the twenty-first century, striving for innovative, responsive, and equitable solutions at all levels of government and in the private and civic sectors.

To accomplish this, the Carsey School will engage faculty and other experts from a wide range of disciplines. Our work will be grounded in active engagement with leaders working to address societal needs. By the very nature of our work, we will create reciprocal, sustained relationships with community, agency, and government leaders.

The research and teaching we conduct will inform effective policy solutions and demonstrate how social, natural, and applied science can be applied to real-world problems. We will create opportunities for emerging public and civic leaders to develop practical skills and expertise necessary for improving conditions in communities in the United States and abroad."[1]

History[edit]

University of New Hampshire alumna Marcy Peterson Carsey, a 1966 cum laude graduate in English literature and the producer of television shows, including The Cosby Show and Roseanne, established the Carsey Institute through a financial gift to the university in May 2002.[2][3] The Carsey Institute was created to address the new reality of families and women, work, and communities in the 21st century.[4]

Over the next ten years, the Carsey Institute, under the leadership of Cynthia "Mil" Duncan and then Bruce Mallory, grew to become a respected national resource for timely, relevant applied research analysis of critical social, economic, and environmental issues facing families and communities.

In 2013, Marcy Carsey gave a second gift of $20 million to the University of New Hampshire to establish a school of public policy. This gift is the second largest in the university's history. In June 2014, Founding Director Michael Ettlinger joined the Carsey School of Public Policy, arriving from his post as senior director at the Pew Charitable Trusts.

Publications[edit]

The Carsey School of Public Policy produces topical and timely briefs that present accessible analysis of complex data on pressing issues that are grounded in real-world conditions and tied to current policy debates.[5] The publications program is at the center of the Carsey School's work to offer high quality, powerful resources to decision makers working with vulnerable families[6] and communities. [7] Carsey School publications provide historical perspective, incorporate the most recent data available, and explore policy implications.Current areas of interest include social innovation and finance, vulnerable families, demographics, community and environment, civic engagement, sustainable development, and evaluation. The Carsey School, based in Durham, New Hampshire, also publishes a variety of briefs specific to the state.

Programs[edit]

The Carsey School of Public Policy oversees a variety of programs, including the Center on Social Innovation and Finance, Community and Environment, Community Development Finance, Demography, Evaluation, New Hampshire issues, NH Listens (a civic engagement project), and Vulnerable Families Research Program.

The Carsey School expects to offer multiple degrees in the future. Currently offered academic programs include a Master of Arts in Community Development Policy and Practice, certificate programs on community development, microenterprise and finance.

Funders[edit]

The Carsey School is funded through support of philanthropic institutions, public and non-profit agencies, individuals and a founding gift endowed by Marcy Carsey. Some of the school's funders include the Ford,[8] Kellogg, Annie E. Casey,[9] New Hampshire Charitable,[10] and Fuller Foundations,[11] Jane's Trust, the New Hampshire Endowment for Health,[12] the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation,[13] the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation,[14] the F.B. Heron Foundation,[15] the New Hampshire Children's Alliance,[16][17] and the Maine and Vermont Community Foundations.[18][19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire". carsey.unh.edu. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  2. ^ "Malibu's Wealthy: Marcy Carsey". Malibucomplete.com. 2000-07-29. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  3. ^ "Noted UNH Alumna Funds Institute for Effective Families and Communities". Unh.edu. 2002-05-07. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  4. ^ "Nationally Known Sociologist Returns to UNH to Run Carsey Institute". Unh.edu. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  5. ^ "Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire - Search Publications". carsey.unh.edu. 2012-10-16. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  6. ^ Plumb, Taryn (2010-02-18). "Role adjustments - The Boston Globe". Boston.com. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  7. ^ http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/news/831792-196/from-northern-lakes-to-rising-tides-nh.html
  8. ^ "University of New Hampshire | Grants". Ford Foundation. 2010-02-17. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  9. ^ "Carsey Institute Reports on Rural America". Aecf.org. 2008-03-20. Archived from the original on 2011-01-17. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  10. ^ "NH Charitable Foundation". Nhcf.org. 2009-02-10. Archived from the original on 2011-07-24. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  11. ^ "The Fuller Foundation. Inc". Fullerfoundation.org. Archived from the original on 2011-07-26. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  12. ^ "Home". Endowment for Health. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  13. ^ "Comparative Rural Economy Survey". Mott.org. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  14. ^ "The Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation". Mrbf.org. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  15. ^ "The F.B. Heron Foundation: Welcome". Fbheron.org. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  16. ^ "The Children's Alliance of New Hampshire". Childrennh.org. Archived from the original on 2011-02-27. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  17. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-25. Retrieved 2010-08-31. 
  18. ^ "Home". Mainecf.org. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 
  19. ^ "VCF - Home". Vermontcf.org. Retrieved 2011-03-13. 

External links[edit]