The Caverns of Kalte

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The Caverns of Kalte
Cavernskalte.jpg
Author Joe Dever
Cover artist Originally Gary Chalk; US edition Don Maitz
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Series Lone Wolf
Genre Children's literature
Publisher Berkley / Pacer
Publication date
1984
Media type Print (Paperback)
ISBN 0-425-09357-3
OCLC 27055736
Preceded by Fire on the Water
Followed by The Chasm of Doom

The Caverns of Kalte is the third book of the award-winning Lone Wolf book series created by Joe Dever.

Gameplay[edit]

With this third book, players (readers) will begin to find that having played through the previous books in the series and thus carried characters forward from these books can help to a relatively large extent. Since each book successfully completed grants an additional discipline and mastery level, certain parts of the book are substantially harder without these bonuses. This same theme continues through each Lone Wolf book in a given series, encouraging readers to either play through the previous books multiple times, or resort to "cheating" in some capacity.

Plot[edit]

After defeating Darklord Zagarna’s invasion, Sommerlund has begun rebuilding and little scars of war remain after one year. Work on rebuilding the Kai Monastery was about to commence when disturbing news from the north came. The merchants returning from summer trading to Kalte told of Brumalmarc, leader of the Ice Barbarian, has fallen to a hunch-backed magician. The description fit non-other than Vonotar, the former wizard from the Brotherhood of the Crystal Star, who betrayed Sommerlund and helped the Darklord Zagarna in the invasion and massacre of the Kai Order.

Apparently after the darklord defeat, he make his way to the frozen wastes of Kalte and to the ice fortress of Ikaya and through deception, manage to trick the Cruel Brumalmarc to adopt him as his magician and thus cost him his life and fortress. News of his survival spread in Sommerlund like wildfire with people demanding he pay for his treachery. The king is obliged to promise that the traitor be brought back and stand trial for his crimes and thus has ask you to go capture and bring him back.

Reception[edit]

Some had speculated that this would be the end of the book series, but Joe Dever had always planned on writing at least four as part of his book deal, and had already sketched out the first 12 at the time the series was first commissioned.[1]

Awards[edit]

  • Gamebook of the Year 1987

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dever, Joe (1998). "Joe Dever". The Kai Monastery. Retrieved 2006-04-27. 

External links[edit]