The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Guatemala

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An LDS meetinghouse in Guatemala

As of January 1, 2011, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints reported 226,027 members in 39 stakes and 19 districts, 415 congregations (235 wards[1] and 180 branches[1]), five missions, and two temples in the Guatemala.[2]

History[edit]

The first missionaries arrived in Guatemala in 1947. The first convert in Guatemala was baptised in 1948. The Central American Mission headquartered in Guatemala City was organized in 1952. The church obtained official recognition in Guatemala in 1966. Guatemala's first stake was formed in 1967 in Guatemala City. [3][2]

Missions[edit]

Temples[edit]

Guatemala City Temple by rkuhnau.jpg

32. Guatemala City Guatemala edit

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Guatemala City, Guatemala
1 April 1981
14 December 1984 by Gordon B. Hinckley
14°35′0.2004″N 90°29′8.1672″W / 14.583389000°N 90.485602000°W / 14.583389000; -90.485602000 (Guatemala City Guatemala Temple)
11,610 sq ft (1,079 m2) and 126 ft (38 m) high on a 1.4 acre (0.6 ha) site
Modern adaptation of six-spire design - designed by Church A&E Services and Jose Asturias

Quetzaltenango Guatemala Temple.jpg

135. Quetzaltenango Guatemala edit

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Quetzaltenango
17 December 2006
11 December 2011 by Dieter F. Uchtdorf
14°50′41″N 91°32′23″W / 14.84472°N 91.53972°W / 14.84472; -91.53972 (Quetzaltenango Guatemala Temple)
21,085 sq ft (1,959 m2) on a 6.47 acre (2.6 ha) site
Announced by Gordon B. Hinckley at the groundbreaking of the Oquirrh Mountain Temple,[4] and dedicated by Dieter F. Uchtdorf.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b LDS Meetinghouse Locator.Nearby Congregations (Wards and Branches).
  2. ^ a b "Facts and Statistics: Statistics by Country: Guatemala", Newsroom (LDS Church), 31 December 2011, retrieved 2012-10-18 
  3. ^ "Country information: Guatemala", Church News Online Almanac (Deseret News), January 29, 2010, retrieved 2012-10-18 
  4. ^ Moore, Carrie A. (December 17, 2006), "Ground broken for LDS temple", Deseret Morning News, retrieved 2012-10-15 
  5. ^ Swensen, Jason (December 11, 2011), "Quetzaltenango Guatemala Temple: 'This temple will bring eternal families to this place and country'", Church News, retrieved 2012-10-15 

External links[edit]