The Clapper

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The Clapper with a lamp plugged in at bottom

The Clapper is a sound-activated electrical switch,[1] sold by San Francisco, California based Joseph Enterprises, Inc. Robert E. Clapper, Sr., and Richard J. Pirong marketed the clapper with the slogan "Clap On! Clap Off! The Clapper!".[2]

The Clapper plugs into a U.S.-type electrical outlet, and allows control of up to two devices plugged into the Clapper.[3] An upgraded model, known as the Clapper Plus, includes a remote control function in addition to the original sound-based activation.[4]

Although meant to activate by clapping, The Clapper can inadvertently be triggered by other noises,[5] such as coughing, a dog barking, a cabinet or door being closed, laughter, yelling, banging, knocking on a door or a wall, other sharp sounds, or noises from televisions and speakers.

Patent[edit]

The Clapper was invented by Carlile R. Stevens and Dale E. Reamer, and issued U.S. Patent #5493618, which was published on 20 February 1996.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A tale of useless toys". The Free Lance-Star. January 10, 2003. Retrieved 24 December 2013.
  2. ^ Harry, Lou; Stall, Sam (2002). "The Clapper". As Seen on TV: 50 Amazing Products and the Commercials that Made Them Famous. California: Chronicle Books. pp. 90–91. ISBN 978-1-931686-09-9.
  3. ^ "The Clapper: Does It Work?". KCBD News. December 25, 2002. Retrieved 24 December 2013.
  4. ^ Lam, Brian (August 30, 2010). "The 21st Century Clapper". Gizmodo. Retrieved 24 December 2013.
  5. ^ "The Clapper: "Does It Work?"". KTRE News. Retrieved 24 December 2013.
  6. ^ "Method and apparatus for activating switches in response to different acoustic signals". Retrieved 2 November 2017.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

External video
"Clap On! Clap Off! The Clapper". ABC News. July 16, 2009.