The Crimson Circle (1936 film)

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The Crimson Circle
"The Crimson Circle" (1936).jpg
Directed by Reginald Denham
Produced by Richard Wainwright
Written by Edgar Wallace (novel)
Howard Irving Young
Starring Hugh Wakefield
Alfred Drayton
Niall MacGinnis
June Duprez
Cinematography Philip Tannura
Production
company
Richard Wainwright Productions
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release date
1936
Running time
76 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English

The Crimson Circle is a 1936 British crime film directed by Reginald Denham and starring Hugh Wakefield, Alfred Drayton, and Niall MacGinnis.[1] It is based on the 1922 novel The Crimson Circle by Edgar Wallace. It was made by the independent producer Richard Wainwright at Shepperton and Welwyn Studios.[2]

Plot[edit]

Detectives at Scotland Yard try to track down The Crimson Circle, a secret society of blackmailers.

Earlier versions[edit]

There was a British silent version in 1922; and a previous UK/German co-production of The Crimson Circle, produced in the DeForest Phonofilm sound-on-film system, which was trade-shown in London in March 1929, along with an early sound version of Wallace's The Clue of the New Pin.

Cast[edit]

Critical reception[edit]

The New York Times wrote, "after the first five minutes or so of the Globe's current thriller from England, it may occur to you that the title, The Crimson Circle, is a matter of slight understatement. Please remember, then, that this is an Inspector Parr story, and that British producers do not presume to change Edgar Wallace titles, no matter how much more fitting something like The Gory Horde may seem. Anyway, after the first five minutes you will become reconciled to this omnibus of 'omicide, remembering, if you know your Edgar Wallace, that a dozen murders is about Parr for the course." [3]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Low, Rachael. Filmmaking in 1930s Britain. George Allen & Unwin, 1985.
  • Wood, Linda. British Films, 1927-1939. British Film Institute, 1986.

External links[edit]