The Crystal Lake

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"The Crystal Lake"
CrystalLake.jpg
Single by Grandaddy
from the album The Sophtware Slump
A-side "The Crystal Lake"
B-side "Our Dying Brains"
Released May 29, 2000
Format CD, vinyl
Genre Indie rock
Label V2
Writer(s) Jason Lytle
Producer(s) Jason Lytle
Grandaddy singles chronology
"A.M. 180"
(1998)
"The Crystal Lake"
(2000)
"He's Simple, He's Dumb, He's the Pilot."
(2000)

"The Crystal Lake" is a song by American indie rock band Grandaddy from their second album, The Sophtware Slump. It was released as a single on May 29, 2000 by record label V2,[1] and was re-released in several formats in early 2001.

Content[edit]

Grandaddy frontman Jason Lytle described the song as "that age-old story, repeated many times in country music, of the wayward soul who leaves a small town with hopes and dreams of the unknown and winds up full of regret in some horrible little apartment in an unfriendly city".[2]

Release and reception[edit]

"The Crystal Lake" was released as a single on May 29, 2000. It peaked at number 38 on the UK Singles Chart.[3]

The song was listed as the 295th best song of the 2000s by Pitchfork.[4]

Track listings[edit]

2000 release
CD
No. Title Length
1. "The Crystal Lake"  
2. "Our Dying Brains"  
3. "First Movement/Message Send: ID#5646766"  
7"
No. Title Length
1. "The Crystal Lake"  
2. "Our Dying Brains"  
2001 releases
CD1
No. Title Length
1. "The Crystal Lake"  
2. "Moe Bandy Mountaineers"  
3. "She-Deleter"  
CD2
No. Title Length
1. "The Crystal Lake"  
2. "What Can't Be Erased"  
3. "I Don't Want to Record Anymore"  
7"
No. Title Length
1. "The Crystal Lake"  
2. "Rode My Bike to My Sister's Wedding"  

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Grandaddy Frontman in Hat Spat", NME, May 23, 2000, retrieved 2011-08-07
  2. ^ McCormick, Neil (2001) "Bearded and proud", Daily Telegraph, February 1, 2001, retrieved 2011-08-07
  3. ^ "Grandaddy | Full Official Chart History | Official Charts Company". Official Charts. Retrieved July 3, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Staff Lists: The Top 500 Tracks of the 2000s: 500-201". Pitchfork. 17 August 2009. Retrieved 1 August 2011. 

External links[edit]