The Devil's Tune

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The Devil's Tune
Devilstune.jpg
Front Cover
Author Iain Duncan Smith
Country England
Language English
Genre Thriller
Publisher Robson Books (a division of Anova Books)
Publication date
November 6, 2003
Media type Print (Hardback)

The Devil's Tune is a novel by the Conservative Party politician Iain Duncan Smith, published in November 2003.

The book is notable for its uniformly negative reception, such that, as of March 2013, a paperback edition was never published.[1]

Literary significance and criticism[edit]

  • "And I honestly wish I didn't have to say this, because it feels like kicking a man when he is down... but, really, it's terrible. Human sympathy strains in one direction; critical judgment the other. Terrible, terrible, terrible."
Sam Leith, Daily Telegraph[2]
  • "The Devil's Tune by Iain Duncan Smith is scarcely the greatest literature of all time but as a thriller and easy read it will while away a plane journey (or, at 400-plus pages, a couple of plane journeys) perfectly pleasantly...the dialogue is severely cliché-ridden but people do have a habit of talking in clichés."
Ann Widdecombe, Conservative politician and novelist[2]
  • "It's not exactly Tolstoy, is it?"
Edwina Currie, Conservative politician and novelist[2]
John Sutherland, Northcliffe Professor of English Literature, University College London[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rebecca Tyrrel: Iain Duncan Smith's one novel was such a calamity, it never made it to a paperback edition". The Independent. 2 March 2013. Retrieved 24 July 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d "'I hate to kick a man when he's down, but...'". BBC News. 6 November 2003. Retrieved 23 August 2015.