The Disappearance of Aimee

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The Disappearance of Aimee
The Disappearance of Aimee.jpg
VHS box art
Written byJohn McGreevey
Directed byAnthony Harvey
StarringFaye Dunaway
Bette Davis
James Sloyan
James Woods
Music bySteve Byrne
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
Production
Executive producer(s)Thomas W. Moore
Producer(s)Paul Leaf
CinematographyJames Crabe
Editor(s)Arline Garson
Jerry Greenberg
Running time100 minutes
Production company(s)Hallmark Hall of Fame
Tomorrow Entertainment
DistributorNBC
Release
Original networkNBC
Original release
  • November 17, 1976 (1976-11-17)

The Disappearance of Aimee is a 1976 American made-for-television biographical drama film directed by Anthony Harvey and starring Faye Dunaway as the evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, co-starring Bette Davis, James Sloyan and James Woods. The film originally premiered as a presentation of Hallmark Hall of Fame on NBC on November 17, 1976.

Plot[edit]

Based on true events, the film attempts to investigate the mysterious disappearance of Aimee Semple McPherson in 1926 and the court case that followed her safe return after being missing for four weeks.

Cast[edit]

Discussion in Bette Davis Memoir[edit]

In her memoir This 'n That (1987, Berkley Pub Group), Bette Davis recounted several anecdotes about working on The Disappearance of Aimee. Among them was that her co-star, Faye Dunaway, was one of the most unprofessional people she had ever worked with. Davis stated that Dunaway would show up hours late, not knowing her lines, and being generally difficult. For one of the scenes in the un-air-conditioned tabernacle, over 1800 unpaid extras (locals who had been promised a box lunch and a chance to be in a movie) were left for hours awaiting Dunaway's arrival. When they finally began leaving, Davis rushed to the pulpit and began singing "I've Written a Letter to Daddy," a song from her wildly popular 1962 film What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?. Hearing her, many returned to their seats in the pews.

External links[edit]