The Doberman Gang

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The Doberman Gang
The Doberman Gang Poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byByron Chudnow
Produced byDavid Chudnow
Irving Temaner
Written byLouis Garfinkle
Frank Ray Perilli
StarringByron Mabe
Hal Reed
Julie Parrish
Simmy Bow
JoJo D'Amore
John Tull
Jay Paxton
Music byAlan Silvestri
Bradford Craig
CinematographyRobert Caramico
Edited byHerman Freedman
Production
company
Rosamond Productions
Distributed byDimension Pictures
Columbia Broadcasting System
International Film Distributors
Lorimar Productions
Sofradis
Warner Bros. (2010, DVD)
Release date
  • May 26, 1972 (1972-05-26) (Atlanta)[1]
Running time
87 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$100,000 (estimated)

The Doberman Gang is a 1972 film about a talented animal trainer who uses a pack of six Doberman Pinschers to commit a bank robbery. The six dogs were all named after famous bank robbers. Their names were Dillinger (John Dillinger), Bonnie (Bonnie Parker), Clyde (Clyde Barrow), Pretty Boy Floyd, Baby Face Nelson, and Ma Barker.

The film's score was the first to be composed by Alan Silvestri, who found later success with the soundtracks for more notable films such as the Back to the Future trilogy and Forrest Gump.

The film was shot completely on location in Simi Valley, California.

Cast[edit]

  • Byron Mabe as Eddie Newton
  • Hal Reed as Barney Greer
  • Julie Parrish as June
  • Simmy Bow as Sammy
  • JoJo D'Amore as Jojo
  • John Tull as pet shop owner
  • Jay Paxton as bank manager

Reception[edit]

Gene Siskel of the Chicago Tribune gave the film 3 stars out of 4, likening it to "sort of a canine 'Bonnie and Clyde' in quality as well as content," and wrote that although "the film runs out of creative gas after the robbery and settles for a stupid ending, the robbery and its planning provide generous portions of laughs and tension."[2] Kevin Thomas of the Los Angeles Times wrote, "Low in budget but high in imaginativeness, it's an amusing, well-crafted diversion."[3] John Raisbeck of The Monthly Film Bulletin wrote that the film "hovers uncertainly between straight thriller and comedy, and although some sequences are played quite overtly for laughs ... the comic element elsewhere seems to be trickling in unintentionally."[4]

Sequels and remakes[edit]

The Doberman Gang was followed by three sequels: The Daring Dobermans (1973), The Amazing Dobermans (1976) and Alex and the Doberman Gang (1980). The first two films were released on manufacture-on-demand DVD-R discs as part of the Warner Archive Collection from 35mm optical sound release prints in 2010, while the original's out-of-print 1986 videocassette release from CBS/Fox's Key Video label used superior quality magnetic soundtrack elements from Lorimar Productions, whose film library they were issuing on video at the time.

In 2003 it was reported that producers Dean Devlin and Charles Segars obtained the film rights in hopes of creating a remake, with Byron Chudnow acting as executive producer. In October 2010 it was announced that producer Darren Reagan of 11eleven Entertainment, along with Cesar Millan, was developing the remake.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Doberman Gang - Details". AFI Catalog of Feature Films. Retrieved November 22, 2018.
  2. ^ Siskel, Gene (June 20, 1972). "Doberman Gang". Chicago Tribune. Section 2, p. 5.
  3. ^ Thomas, Kevin (September 1, 1972). "Dobermans in Bank Caper". Los Angeles Times. Part IV, p. 17.
  4. ^ Raisbeck, John (August 1974). "The Doberman Gang". The Monthly Film Bulletin. 41 (487): 174.
  5. ^ McNary, Dave (October 25, 2010). "'Dog Whisperer' digs up 'Doberman' films". Variety. Retrieved July 5, 2011.

External links[edit]