The Eddie Cantor Story

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The Eddie Cantor Story
Directed by Alfred E. Green
Produced by Sidney Skolsky
Starring Keefe Brasselle
Marilyn Erskine
Aline MacMahon
Edited by William H. Ziegler
Distributed by Warner Brothers
Release dates
25 December 1953 (NYC)
20 January 1954 (US)
Running time
115 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $2.3 million (US)[1]

The Eddie Cantor Story is a 1953 American film about the life of Eddie Cantor, starring Keefe Brasselle as Cantor, and released by Warner Brothers.[2]

Plot[edit]

Raised by his grandmother on New York's East Side, 13-year-old Eddie sings while another neighborhood kid, Rocky Kramer, and his gang pick pockets. Eddie is sent by Grandma Esther to a boys' camp, where he entertains the others with his songs and routines.

Ida Tobias, daughter of a local merchant, elopes with Eddie a few years later. Rocky is now a local politician and gets Eddie a job in a nightclub. Eddie tells the family he's the star performer there, but he's actually a singing waiter. But piano player Jimmy Durante helps land him a job in a California show.

A headline performer envious of Eddie's popularity pulls a prank, telling him Flo Ziegfeld wants him for the Follies show in New York. It turns out Ziegfeld has never heard of Eddie when he arrives at the theater, but an audition by Eddie is so good, Ziegfeld does indeed hire him.

Ida gives birth to several children while Eddie becomes a big success. She's upset that his family doesn't seem to come first, and matters are complicated when Eddie's fortune is lost in the 1929 stock-market crash. A heart attack slows Eddie, as well, but he prospers on the radio as his health improves, and soon he is happy at work and at home.

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 'The Top Box-Office Hits of 1954', Variety Weekly, January 5, 1955
  2. ^ "The Eddie Cantor Story", New York Times, December 26, 1953 accessed July 6, 2012

External links[edit]