The Emancipator

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The Emancipator was an American newspaper founded in 1819 by Elihu Embree[1], the son of a Quaker minister, as the Manumission Intelligencier, and was an abolitionist newspaper in Jonesborough, Tennessee.[1]

History[edit]

It was published from April 1820 to October 1820, when publication ceased due to Embree's illness,[1] and then sold to Benjamin Lundy in 1821, when it became The Genius of Universal Emancipation.

The editor was Theodore Dwight Weld.

Dedication[edit]

The Emancipator was devoted to the abolition of slavery, in this, it was the first newspaper in the United States[1]

Reprint[edit]

The Emancipator was reprinted by B. H. Murphy of Nashville in 1932[1].

Further newspapers[edit]

  • In 1845 in Boston (Mass.) a newspaper was founded, by Hiram Cummings, lasting up to 1848[2]
  • In 1835 in New York City a newspaper was founded, by R.G. Williams, lasting up to 1841 [3]

See also[edit]

Literature[edit]

  • Vaughn, Stephen L. (editor) Encyclopedia of American Journalism (Routledge, 2009) p. 4

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Mielnik, Tara Mitchell (1 January 2010). "The Emancipator". Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. University of Tennessee Press. Retrieved 23 January 2014.
  2. ^ "About The emancipator. (Boston [Mass.]) 1845-1848". Retrieved 2017-08-16.
  3. ^ "About The emancipator".