European Magazine

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European Magazine
EuropeanMagazine-coverOct1799.png
Front page, October 1799
Editor 1782: James Perry
1782–1807: Isaac Reed
1807–c.1820: Stephen Jones
c.1820–?: Alfred Beauchamp[1]
Frequency Monthly
Circulation 3,250 (late 1700s)[1]
Founder James Perry
First issue January 1782 (1782-01)
Final issue June 1826 (1826-06)
Country United Kingdom
Based in London
Language English

The European Magazine was a monthly magazine published in London. Eighty-nine semi-annual volumes were published from 1782 until 1826. It was launched as the European Magazine, and London Review in January 1782, promising to offer "the Literature, History, Politics, Arts, Manners, and Amusements of the Age." It was in direct competition with The Gentleman's Magazine,[1] and in 1826 was absorbed into the Monthly Magazine.[2]

Soon after launching the European Magazine, its founding editor, James Perry, passed proprietorship to the Shakespearean scholar Isaac Reed and his partners John Sewell and Daniel Braithwaite, who guided the magazine during its first two decades.[1]

The articles and other contributions in the magazine appeared over initials or pseudonyms and have largely remained anonymous.[1] Scholars believe that the contributions include the first published poem by William Wordsworth (1787)[3][4] and the earliest known printing of "O Sanctissima", the popular Sicilian Mariners Hymn (1792).[5][6]

Beech Hill Park, as illustrated in European Magazine, 1796.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e de Montluzin, Emily Lorraine. "Attributions of Authorship in the European Magazine, 1782–1826". University of Virginia. 
  2. ^ Brake, Laurel; Demoor, Marysa, eds. (2009). Dictionary of Nineteenth-Century Journalism in Great Britain and Ireland. Academia Press. p. 422. 
  3. ^ Wordsworth, William [Axiologus] (March 1787). "Sonnet, on Seeing Miss Helen Maria Williams Weep at a Tale of Distress". European Magazine. 11 (3): 202. 
  4. ^ Reed, Mark L. (1967). Wordsworth: The Chronology of the Early Years 1770–1799. p. 71. a sonnet printed in the European Magazine... signed Axiologus 
  5. ^ Seward, William (November 1792). "Drossiana. Number XXXVIII. The Sicilian Mariner's Hymn to the Virgin". European Magazine. 22 (5): 342, 385–386. 
  6. ^ Brink, Emily; Polman, Bert, eds. (1988). "Sicilian Mariners". The Psalter Hymnal Handbook. The European Magazine and London Review first published it in 1792. 
  7. ^ Clark, Nancy. (1978) Hadley Wood: Its background and development. 2nd revised edition. p. 65.

Further reading[edit]

  • Helene E. Roberts's short overview of the European Magazine in Alvin Sullivan, ed., British Literary Magazines: The Augustan Age and the Age of Johnson, 1698–1788 (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1983), pp. 106–112.