The Glory of Love (song)

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For the song by Peter Cetera, see Glory of Love.
"The Glory of Love"
Single by Benny Goodman
Released 1936
Format 78 rpm vinyl
Recorded 1936
Genre Pop
Writer(s) Billy Hill
Benny Goodman singles chronology
"The Glory of Love'"
(1936)
The Five Keys singles chronology
"The Glory of Love'"
(1951)
"Yes Sir, That's My Baby"
(1952)

"The Glory of Love" is a song written by Billy Hill, recorded by Benny Goodman in 1936, whose version was a number one pop hit. In 1951, R&B vocal group, The Five Keys, had their biggest R&B hit with their version of the song, hitting number one on the R&B chart for four non-consecutive weeks.[1] Although The Five keys recording sold a reported million copies pressed recordings are very rare.[2]

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1951) Peak
position
US Billboard Hot Rhythm & Blues Songs 1

Otis Redding version[edit]

"The Glory of Love"
Single by Otis Redding
from the album The Dock of the Bay
B-side "I'm Coming Home"
Released 1967
Format 7" vinyl
Recorded December, 1967
Genre Soul, Pop
Length 2:38
Label Volt
S419
Writer(s) Billy Hill
Producer(s) Steve Cropper
Otis Redding singles chronology
"Shake"
(1967)
"The Glory of Love"
(1967)
"Tramp"
(1967)

In 1967, Otis Redding recorded a cover version for his 1968 album, The Dock of the Bay. Redding's cover became a top 20 hit and reached number nineteen on the Billboard R&B Songs chart and number sixty on the Billboard Hot 100.[3]

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Chart (1967) Peak
position
US Billboard Hot 100[4] 60
US Billboard Hot Rhythm & Blues Songs[5] 19

References[edit]

  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 205. 
  2. ^ Propes, Steve (1973). Those Oldies But Goodies: A Guide to 50's Record Collecting. The Macmillan Company, New York. p. 42. 
  3. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 486. 
  4. ^ "allmusic ((( Otis Redding > Awards )))". Billboard. Retrieved 2012-11-22. 
  5. ^ "Billboard R&B Singles Chart". Billboard. Retrieved 2016-01-27. 
Preceded by
"Sixty Minute Man" by The Dominoes
Billboard Best Selling Retail Rhythm & Blues Records number-one single (The Five Keys version)
September 22, 1951
Succeeded by
"Sixty Minute Man" by The Dominoes