The Hackers Conference

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Andy Hertzfeld wearing a Hackers Conference t-shirt

The Hackers Conference is an annual invitation-only gathering of designers, engineers and programmers to discuss the latest developments and innovations in the computer industry. On a daily basis, many hackers only interact virtually, and therefore rarely have face-to-face contact. The conference is a time for hackers to come together to share ideas.[1]

History[edit]

The first Hackers Conference was organized in 1984 in Marin County, California, by Stewart Brand and his associates at Whole Earth and The Point Foundation.[2] It was conceived in response to Steven Levy's book, Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, which inspired Brand to arrange a meeting between the individuals, or "hackers", the book named.[2][3] The first conference's roughly 150 attendees included Steve Wozniak, Ted Nelson, Richard Stallman, John Draper, Richard Greenblatt, Robert Woodhead, and Bob Wallace.[4] The gathering has been identified as instrumental in establishing the libertarian ethos attributed to cyberculture,[5] and was the subject of a PBS documentary, produced by KQED: Hackers - Wizards of the Electronic Age.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gabriella Coleman (2010). "The Hacker Conference: A Ritual Condensation and Celebration of a Lifeworld". Anthropological Quarterly. 83 (1): 47–72. doi:10.1353/anq.0.0112. ISSN 1534-1518.
  2. ^ a b Turner, Fred (2006). From counterculture to cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the rise of digital utopianism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 132.
  3. ^ Turner, Fred (2006). From counterculture to cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the rise of digital utopianism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 135.
  4. ^ Turner, Fred (2006). From counterculture to cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network, and the rise of digital utopianism. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. p. 147.
  5. ^ a b Turner, Fred (2006). "How Digital Technology Found Utopian Ideology: Lessons from the First Hackers' Conference". In David Silver; Adrienne Massanari. Critical Cyberculture Studies. New York: NYU Press. pp. 257–269. ISBN 9780814740248.

External links[edit]