The Hound of the Baskervilles (TV serial)

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The Hound of the Baskervilles
Written byNovel:
Arthur Conan Doyle
Screenplay:
Alexander Baron
Directed byPeter Duguid
StarringTom Baker
Terence Rigby
Country of originUK
Original language(s)English
Production
Producer(s)Barry Letts
Editor(s)Nigel Pardoe-Matthews
Release
Original release3 October 1982

The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982) is a British television serial made by the BBC, produced by Barry Letts, directed by Peter Duguid and starring Tom Baker as Sherlock Holmes and Terence Rigby as Doctor Watson.[1] The serial is based on Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes novel The Hound of the Baskervilles. The music score was composed and conducted by Carl Davis.

Production[edit]

This production of Doyle The Hound of the Baskervilles was the second multi-part BBC adaptation, following Peter Cushing's two-part episode for the 1968 television series.[1] The 1982 serial was part of the BBC's Sunday Classics strand of period dramas and literary adaptations.[2]

The serial was a reunion for star Tom Baker, producer Barry Letts and script editor Terrance Dicks[2] who had worked together on Doctor Who.[3] The film aired as a four-part serial in 1982.[3] As the Fourth Doctor, Baker had appeared in a 1977 serial entitled The Talons of Weng-Chiang wherein the Doctor was dressed as Sherlock Holmes complete with deerstalker.[1][3]

Terence Rigby, who portrayed Watson in this production, later played Inspector Layton in the 1983 version of The Sign of Four featuring Ian Richardson as Sherlock Holmes.[1]

The serial was shot in the BBC's Birmingham studios with exterior shots filmed on Dartmoor for film inserts.[1][4] In his later autobiography, Baker claimed "the dog who had been engaged by the BBC to play the hound was gentler than Mother Teresa"[2] and had to be coaxed with sausages to attack Nicholas Woodeson.[2]

Cast[edit]

Reception[edit]

The opinions of viewers at the time was divided[5] and it has not fared better over time.[6][7] Baker himself came to consider his performance a failure[1] saying: "I couldn’t lift the character into that special world that makes Holmes so funny and fascinating."[2] The Daily Telegraph described the adaptation as a "traditional take on Holmes's most famous adventure" and while it selected Baker as 15th in a countdown of "the 20 greatest Sherlock Holmes", it said Baker "may have been better off staying in the TARDIS", arguing that he gave "an oddly flat performance".[8] The Independent has been more favourable, stating "it was inspired casting to put the tall, pop-eyed, mad-voiced Baker into the Holmesian cape and hat", describing him as "a predictably larger-than-life Holmes".[9]

DVD[edit]

The serial was released in Australia on 20/08/2014 by Madman Entertainment. Special features include a commentary by Tom Baker.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Barnes, Alan (2011). Sherlock Holmes on Screen. Titan Books. pp. 85–87. ISBN 9780857687760.
  2. ^ a b c d e Appleton, Jonathan (16 January 2017). "Doctor Holmes – When Tom Baker Was Sherlock". The Doctor Who Companion. Retrieved 19 January 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Haining, Peter (1994). The Television Sherlock Holmes. Virgin Books. p. 83. ISBN 978-0-86369-793-7.
  4. ^ "The Hound of the Baskervilles". BBC. Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  5. ^ Haining, Peter (1994). The Television Sherlock Holmes. Virgin Books. p. 84. ISBN 978-0-86369-793-7.
  6. ^ "A Study In Error: The Ten Worst Sherlock Holmes". shadowlocked.com. Archived from the original on 28 January 2012. Retrieved 28 December 2011.
  7. ^ Eyles, Allen (1986). Sherlock Holmes: A Centenary Celebration. Harper & Row. p. 123. ISBN 978-0-06-015620-6.
  8. ^ "15. Tom Baker - Sherlock: the 20 greatest Sherlock Holmes". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 11 April 2015.
  9. ^ "Holmes Sweet Holmes: Literature's Greatest Sleuth". The Independent. Retrieved 11 April 2015.
  10. ^ "The Hound of the Baskervilles". Madman Entertainment. Retrieved 5 February 2018.

External links[edit]