Israel Law Review

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Israel Law Review
Cover
DisciplineLaw
LanguageEnglish
Publication details
History1966–present
Publisher
Hebrew University's Minerva Center for Human Rights (Israel)
FrequencyQuarterly
Standard abbreviations
ISO 4Isr. Law Rev.
Indexing
ISSN0021-2237
OCLC no.1754008
Links

The Israel Law Review is the oldest Israeli law journal published in English.[1][2][3] In Great American Lawyers, an Encyclopaedia, it is referred to as being among "the most prestigious of scholarly journals".[4] The journal focuses on Israeli law and on issues relevant to Israeli society.[2][3]

History[edit]

The journal was established in January 1966 by the Israeli Law Review Association, under the auspices of senior members of the Faculty of Law of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.[3][5][6][7] It has been published since 2009 by Cambridge University Press under the management of the Minerva Center for Human Rights at the Law Faculty of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.[8] Originally there was consideration given to publishing the journal in French, but the decision was made to publish it in English.[7][9] It was peer-reviewed from the outset.[7]

When the journal was established, it became the second law review in Israel, the first being Ha-Praklit ("The Attorney"), which was run by the Israeli Bar and published short practical articles in Hebrew.[7]

At the time of its establishment, Avigdor Levontin was its editor-in-chief.[10] From 1996 until 2001, its editor was Frances Raday.[11] Currently, it is edited by Yuval Shany and Malcolm Shaw.[12]

Abstracting and indexing[edit]

The journal is indexed in LexisNexis,[13] Hein,[3] and EBSCO databases.[2]

Notable articles[edit]

In 1969, Israeli Supreme Court Justice Haim Cohn published an article in the journal, which was reported on by the Associated Press and picked up widely by newspapers, in which he indicated that Jewish officials sought to save Jesus from Roman execution, but he refused to cooperate.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Israel Law Review". Cambridge. Archived from the original on 29 August 2021. Retrieved 29 August 2021.
  2. ^ a b c "Israel Law Review". Law.huji.ac.il. Archived from the original on 26 February 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  3. ^ a b c d "Israel Law Review". Heinonline.org. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  4. ^ Vile, John R. (2001). Great American lawyers: an encyclopedia. ISBN 9781576072028. Archived from the original on 20 March 2022. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  5. ^ Goldstein, Stephen (8 July 1993). "Bringing Israeli Law To The English Reader". Pqasb.pqarchiver.com. Archived from the original on 2 November 2012. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  6. ^ "Studies in Israel Legislative Problems]. Edited by G. Tedeschi and U. Yadin. Volume XVI, Scripta Hierosolymitana. The Magnes Press, 1966. 241 pp. Israel Law Review. Vol. I, Number 1. Executive Editor, A. M. Apelbom. Editorial Board, B. Akzin, S. Ginossar and A. V. Levantin. Israel Law Review Association, under the auspices of the Faculty of Law, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. January 1966". Journals.cambridge.org. 17 January 2008. Archived from the original on 21 October 2012. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  7. ^ a b c d "The Yigal Arnon & Co. Legal History Workshop" (PDF). Tau.ac.il. Archived (PDF) from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 11 February 2016.
  8. ^ "Information". Cambridge Core. Archived from the original on 19 July 2018. Retrieved 8 May 2021.
  9. ^ "When, How, and Why Did Israeli Law Faculties Come to Resemble Elite U.S. Law Schools? by Pnina Lahav". 29 July 2009. SSRN 1440864. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |url= (help)
  10. ^ "Welcome to ActivePaper". Digitalnewspapers.libraries.psu.edu. 26 October 1966. Archived from the original on 3 April 2012. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  11. ^ "Frances Raday". Jewish Women's Archive. Archived from the original on 10 April 2010. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  12. ^ "Editorial board". Cambridge Core. Archived from the original on 5 August 2020. Retrieved 8 May 2021.
  13. ^ "LexisNexis". LexisNexis. 2 November 1999. Archived from the original on 1 June 2012. Retrieved 26 June 2010.
  14. ^ Cornell, George W. (September 26, 1969). "Scholar says Jesus wouldn't help himself". The Miami News.; "New View on Trial of Jesus". Reading Eagle. Archived from the original on 20 March 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2020.; "Ancient Execution Has New Conclusion". Ocala Star-Banner.; "Conclusion on Jesus Execution". Southeast Missourian. Archived from the original on 20 March 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2020.; "Judge claims Sanhedrin tried to save Jesus". The Gazette (Montreal). Archived from the original on 20 March 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2020.; "Did Ancient Jewish Officials Try To Stop Cucifixtion". TimesDaily. Archived from the original on 20 March 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2020.. Associated Press. Retrieved December 27, 2010

External links[edit]