The King of Fighters XI

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The King of Fighters XI
KofXI poster 06.jpg
Arcade flyer for The King of Fighters XI
Developer(s)SNK Playmore, G1M2 (PS2)
Publisher(s)Sega (AW) / SNK Playmore (PS2)
Producer(s)Eikichi Kawasaki
Artist(s)
  • Hiroaki Hashimoto
  • Falcoon (Tatsuhiko Kanaoka)
SeriesThe King of Fighters
Platform(s)Arcade, PlayStation 2, PlayStation Network
Release
  • Arcade
    • JP: October 26, 2005
    • WW: 2006
  • PlayStation 2
    • JP: June 22, 2006
    • EU: July 6, 2007
    • NA: November 13, 2007
  • PlayStation Network
    • JP: December 17, 2014
Genre(s)Fighting
Mode(s)Up to two players simultaneously
CabinetUpright
Arcade systemAtomiswave
SoundYamaha AICA
DisplayHorizontal

The King of Fighters XI is a 2D fighting game produced by SNK Playmore originally released as a coin-operated arcade game for the Atomiswave platform in 2005. It is the eleventh installment in The King of Fighters series following The King of Fighters 2003. The spin-off The King of Fighters Neowave was previously released for the same platform. A home version for the PlayStation 2 was released in Japan in 2006, followed by releases in the PAL region and North America in 2007. Set after the events of The King of Fighters 2003, the story focuses on a group known a "Those From the Past" who aim to obtain the power of the ancient demon Orochi. At the same time, a group of fighters seeks revenge against the protagonist Ash Crimson for stealing the powers of the clans in charge of sealing the creature. The game retains the gameplay elements from The King of Fighters 2003 involving fights between six fighters while at the same calling for assists It also provides new features allowing the player to perform simultaneous multiple special moves.

Development of The King of Fighters XI began after SNK Playmore finished making NeoGeo Battle Coliseum. The major changes to the gameplay and graphics were made possible thanks to the Atomiswave platform. The PlayStation 2 port was notable for its shorter loading times than the original arcade version. Along with providing three new original playable characters, SNK Playmore decided to use characters from older fighting games including Buriki One and Kizuna Encounter to surprise fans. The PlayStation 2 port also adds more characters that can be unlocked. The game was re-released in 2014 for the PlayStation Network.

Critical reception to The King of Fighters XI has been positive. Critics enjoyed the new fighting system, the balance of the characters as well as other elements that managed to surpass its predecessor. However, the graphics were found to be dated due to the use of 2D pixels. A few journalists found the final bosses too complicated to defeat. The game was followed by a sequel titled The King of Fighters XII released in 2009.

Gameplay[edit]

An example of the Dream Cancel feature. In the above picture, Kyo is using a Desperation Move, but changes into a Dream Cancel below in order to perform a stronger move.

The four most substantial innovations The King of Fighters XI brings to the franchise are the Quick Shift, the Saving Shift, the Skill Bar and the Dream Cancels. The Power Stocks that existed before are still present and are filled in the usual fashion. There are now Skill Stocks which gradually build up over time. Each team begins a match holding the maximum two Skill Stocks. Offensive maneuvers, such as Desperation Moves, Guard Cancels, and Tag Attacks, continue to use Power Stocks. However, more defensive or tactical maneuvers, such as Guard Evasion, Saving Shift, and Quick Shift, use Skill Stocks.[1]

The King of Fighters XI uses the Tactical Shift System from The King of Fighters 2003. The Quick Shift allows the player to change into another character in the middle of any combo, prolonging it, or in the middle of any attack, canceling the attack's animation frames if needed. The Saving Shift allows the player to take out a character when he is being hit as soon as he is hit, at the cost of both skill bars. The last new feature of The King of Fighters XI is the Dream Cancel. Like the Super Cancel that first appeared in The King of Fighters '99, Dream Cancel allows players to use stocks to interrupt a move in the midst of its execution with a more powerful move, allowing devastating combos.[1]

Should the timer run down during a match, the winner is no longer decided based on who has the most life remaining. Instead, the judgment bar, a new circular bar composed of two colors, each one representing a player, quantifies each player's skill. Whichever player has the judgment bar towards his or her side is the victor if none of the teams wins by defeating all three characters from the opposite team. On the rare occasion the bar is exactly in the center, the match will end in a draw and both sides will lose. The bar is affected by each attack in which the players are involved. Combos affect the bar more, and when a character of the opposing team is defeated, the bar changes significantly against that player.[1]

The PlayStation 2 port added multiple modes besides the arcade. In Challenge Mode, the player is given multiple missions where they can unlock a total of seven characters seen before in NeoGeo Battle Coliseum.[2] There is also an Edit Mode where the player can alter the appearance of each character and give them different colors such as making Kyo Kusanagi shoot green flames instead of red.[3]

Plot and characters[edit]

During the previous series' installment, Mukai, a member of a mysterious group known as "Those from the Distant Land", stole the seal belonging to the demon Orochi during the last tournament and broke it, causing confusion and destruction. Taking advantage of this situation, Ash Crimson attacked Chizuru Kagura in her weakened state and stole the Yata Mirror from her, draining her powers in the process.[4] From within the installment of a new King of Fighters tournament, new faces are handed invitations while old friends return to the competition itself. These include Eiji Kisaragi (making his long-awaited comeback since his last appearance as a member of the Rival Team in The King of Fighters '95), who creates the Anti-Kyokugen Ryu Team alongside with Kasumi Todoh (who makes her own return since her last appearance as a member of the Women Fighters Team in The King of Fighters 2000), and Malin, who joins up with the two of them. Oswald, an Irish card player who is an expert at using his playing cards to battle, joins Ash and Shen Woo as a part of the Hero Team in order to find the whereabouts of a powerful new drug. Elisabeth Blanctorche, a young French woman who is acquainted with Ash, creates a Rival Team with Benimaru Nikaido and Duo Lon in order to investigate Ash's true intentions from within the tournament.[4]

Duck King, a well-known South Town veteran fighter, joins Terry Bogard and Kim Kaphwan as a part of the Fatal Fury Team due to the fact that Joe Higashi had left to focus on his Muay Thai training while Mai Shiranui had refused to help Terry out after he told her that he did not know where his young brother Andy was. Due to a financial crisis that his family's company is facing at the time, Robert Garcia is unable to take part from within the tournament and thus his place from within the Art of Fighting Team is taken by King, who works together with the Sakazaki siblings Ryo and Yuri. Having recovered his powers lost during the NESTS Chronicles, Sie Kensou returns to the Psycho Soldiers Team alongside with Athena Asamiya and newcomer Momoko, a cheerful capoeira-fighting girl.[4]

Blue Mary forms a new Agent Team with returning characters Vanessa and Ramon. The female pirate B. Jenet, the stoic martial artist Gato, and the Mexican luchador Tizoc form a new team known as the MOTW ("Mark of the Wolves") Team. Due to an emotional trauma that her character had suffered at the end of The King of Fighters 2003, Leona leaves the Ikari Warriors Team in order to focus on regaining her strong resolve and determination and because of this, Whip decides to leave the K′ Team in order to replace her while helping Ralf and Clark out from within their latest assignment. The former NESTS agent, Kula Diamond, joins K' and Maxima in taking Whip's place on the K' Team in order to help them out from within the investigation of their latest threat. Since Chizuru is unable to help her teammates, Shingo Yabuki replaces her from within the Sacred Treasures Team in order to help Kyo Kusanagi and Iori Yagami recover her powers from Ash.[4]

The PlayStation 2 version features seven additional characters taken from NeoGeo Battle Coliseum, who become available once the player clears certain challenges in the game's Challenge Mode. They include: Mai Shiranui (Fatal Fury 2), Robert Garcia (Art of Fighting), Geese Howard (Fatal Fury: King of Fighters), Tung Fu Rue (Fatal Fury: King of Fighters), Mr. Big (Art of Fighting), Hotaru Futaba (Garou: Mark of the Wolves), and EX Kyo Kusanagi (Kyo in his The King of Fighters '99 outfit).

Those from the Past are revealed as the hosts of the tournament with a weapon expert named Shion and a dimension manipulator named Magaki serving as the respective sub and final bosses of the game.[5] Following their defeat, Magaki tries to steal Orochi's power but instead ends up being murdered by his own ally.[6] The weak Orochi seal causes Iori to lose control of himself and beat up his teammates to the point that both Kyo and Shingo are badly injured. Ash appears shortly and defeats Iori, stealing his flames in the process. Elisabeth is then revealed to be associated with Ash, questioning his original job but Ash escapes, warning her, Benimaru, and Duo Lon that he intends to make Kyo his last target and steal his own powers as well.[7][8]

Development and release[edit]

Since the first game in The King of Fighters series, a new game was released every year. The last of them was The King of Fighters 2003. In December 2004, Falcoon, the series' main illustrator, mentioned the next game the SNK Playmore staff were working on releasing was different from the recent spin-off The King of Fighters: Maximum Impact or what could have been The King of Fighters 2004. The game's development began when SNK staff finished making the crossover game Neo Geo Battle Coliseum in 2005.[9] The game was originally to be titled The King of Fighters 2004, but SNK cancelled it in the fall of 2004. Instead they announced an agreement with Sammy Corporation to use their arcade instead of the Neo Geo cabinets that had been used for the franchise previously.[10] The game's arcade version used the Atomiswave system from Sammy Corporation.[11] With this new system, SNK commented The King of Fighters XI would stand out thanks to the graphical and gameplay elements introduced in the game such as animation frames by Iori Yagami. However, it lacked the AW-net, a program that allows players to use the title online. SNK had previously tested this system for both NeoGeo Battle Coliseum and The King of Fighters: Neowave.[12] Hiroaki was the main illustrator of all the game's characters.[1] When the arcade version was released in the USA, cabinets in Tilt Studio locations used converted Final Furlong cabinets, instead of the standard Atomiswave cabinets. As a result of this, there were two screens, one for each player.[13]

The additions of the mid-bosses from Buriki One and Kizuna Encounter were meant to surprise gamers. Since their original moves did not "fit" in The King of Fighters XI, developers had to change some of them.[14][15] The boss character Magaki was designed to "disgust and disturb fans with his movements", giving more characters to the antagonists, Those from the Past. As well, he was meant to be a hated and nonredeemable character due to the difficulty players would have defeating him.[16] The staff had mixed opinions about newcomer Momoko due to her relatively young age. She was designed to fit the Psycho Soldier Team.[17] Meanwhile, Elisbeth was created as a "leading lady" character to give Ash Crimson a rival.[18] The staff paid attention to making the stages, such as the Esaka stage, more realistic. The company planned to add more stages, but they were removed due to time constraints.[2]

The game's Japanese port for the PlayStation 2 was released on June 22, 2006.[4] On September 8, 2006, Ignition Entertainment announced they had licensed The King of Fighters XI for European release.[19] SNK Playmore USA announced the game on November 13, 2007.[20] With respect to the progressive scan, SNK explained that the North American version of the game was based on the PAL region. As a result, the American and PAL versions do not support progressive scan, but the Japanese version does. The port was mostly done by Ignition and then reused in other regions according InsertCredit although SNK remained silent about this.[21] Similar to previous entries, the port offers a rearranged version of the audio.[22] SNK Playmore re-released the game in Japan on June 28, 2007, under the label of "SNK Best Collection".[23] The company once again released the game for the PlayStation Network on December 17, 2014, in Japan.[24]

On March 24, 2006, Scitron and SNK released The King of Fighters XI Sound Collection (ザ・キング・オブ・ファイターズXI サウンドコレクション), a soundtrack from the game. It consists of two CDs, both featuring 37 tracks. While some tracks are identical to the ones from the game, others have been rearranged. Disc one has the tracks from the arcade version, while the disc two has the tracks from the PS2 version. They were composed by SHA-V and arranged by Koji Takata, Masuo Okumura and Masanori Kuki.[25]

Reception[edit]

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
Metacritic75[26]
Review scores
PublicationScore
Eurogamer8/10[27]
Famitsu28/40[28]
GameSpot8.0/10[29]
GamesRadar+3.5/5[31]
IGN8.0/10[30]
Meristation8/10[32]
Cheat Code Central3/5[33]
UveJuegos73/100[34]
GameRevolution3.5/5[35]
GameZone8.1/10[36]

Since the PlayStation 2 was being replaced by a new console during the release of The King of Fighters XI, Gamasutra listed the game as one for the "hardcore gamer".[37] However, in its release week in Japan, The King of Fighters XI was the only PlayStation 2 game to be featured on Japanese game sales charts alongside Konami's World Soccer Winning Eleven 10 suggesting it had wider appeal. The number of copies sold in the period is unknown.[38] The game eventually sold 47,225 units in Japan during 2006.[39]

Critical reception to The King of Fighters XI has been "generally favorable" based on an average score of 75 out of 100 on the Metacritic website.[26] The gameplay and the cast of characters in The King of Fighters XI has been the subject of positive responses.[27][30][33][31] GameZone felt that for a "complex" 2D fighter game it offered the "most bang for your buck" on the PS2.[36] Cheat Code Central enjoyed the system that had three characters fighting against another trio during a single fight. They cited the new mechanics as being an improvement over those of its predecessor The King of Fighters 2003.[33] GamesRadar+ enjoyed the considerably higher number of characters and the noticeably fast combats.[31] Ryan Clements of IGN called it "a very old-school 2D fighter" since the game's style has not changed much since KOF '94. He felt the game is well organized even with the large number of playable characters and enjoyed their variable fighting styles. He added the fights were very difficult for players unless they spend the time learning the characters' special moves.[30] Andrew Park of GameSpot opined that the game was well-balanced with its variety of playable characters and good artwork for the illustrations.[29] Eurogamer called it an "excellent 2D game" comparable to other games such as one of Capcom's most famous games, Street Fighter III. They complained about the lack of popular characters like Leona and Joe Higashi.[27]

The graphics were felt to be dated due to SNK Playmore's constant use of sprites.[33][27][30][31] Eurogamer said this system might not stand out among other fighting game franchises like Soul Calibur which employs appealing 3D graphics in contrast with this game's 2D graphics.[27] Meristation agreed, saying the franchise was in need of a major overhaul of its style.[32] IGN said the graphics should have been optimized for this sequel, though they felt the menus and cutscenes were well done.[30] uVeJuegos.com was more critical, saying that SNK Playmore should have changed the graphics already. They felt the presentation was not well executed.[34] On the other hand, GameRevolution did not mind the use of 2D graphics based on how the scenarios change across the fights.[35] Despite finding the game's graphics dated, GameZone enjoyed the overall presentation, which the reviewer called "one of best fighting games ever to grace the PS2", noting its low price provided great gameplay value.[36]

The boss characters attracted some negative responses. GameSpot described the sub-boss Shion as "terribly powerful", while the final boss, Magaki, was "absurdly overpowered", his voice was not well done and his appearance was unimpressive.[29] GamesRadar+ agreed, citing the bosses as "Typical KoF final boss from hell".[31] While noting the artificial intelligence has improved from that used in The King of Fighters 2003, uVeJuegos.com said Magaki had unfair moves due to his massive damage input during battles.[34] GameRevolution's reviewer felt that Magaki is one of the strongest bosses they had ever seen based on the way he moves across the screen. Proper use of the game's mechanics, however, would allow the player to defeat him and he felt the game was still enjoyable despite this boss.[35]

In a retrospective review, HardcoreGaming regarded The King of Fighters XI as one of the best entries in the franchise, noting the backgrounds' quality, the gameplay and quick load times compared to the original arcade game.[1] In 2012, Complex ranked it as the eighth best SNK fighting game ever made, adding that "Shion has to be the coolest sub-boss ever".[40] In 2009, SNK Playmore released a sequel called The King of Fighters XII.[41] However, as the game did not feature a story, SNK Playmore finished the story arc involving Ash in The King of Fighters XIII released in 2011.[42]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Kalata, Kurt (December 8, 2008). "King of Fighters XI, The". Retrieved November 3, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Lesson 1" (in Japanese). SNK Playmore. Retrieved November 3, 2018.
  3. ^ "Lesson 3" (in Japanese). SNK Playmore. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  4. ^ a b c d e "The King of Fighters XI" (in Japanese). SNK Playmore. Archived from the original on September 6, 2017. Retrieved November 4, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  5. ^ SNK Playmore (November 13, 2007). The King of Fighters XI. Playstation 2. SNK Playmore. Shion:I hear that the King of Fighters is proceeding according to plan, Magaki. / Magaki: You seem very confident. But if Orochi doesn't respond, this will be in vain.
  6. ^ SNK Playmore (November 13, 2007). The King of Fighters XI. Playstation 2. SNK Playmore. Magaki: There's no way Orochi won't respond... Impossible... T-his is... Damn you... Shion....
  7. ^ SNK Playmore (November 13, 2007). The King of Fighters XI. Playstation 2. SNK Playmore. Iori: Grrrr.... I'll kill you... Kyo.../ ... /Shingo:A-Ash... Iori's just gone crazy.../ ... /Iori: Kill.../Ash: Those eyes... I see... If it's this advanced, then that means... Hehhheee. So much pressure!
  8. ^ SNK Playmore (November 13, 2007). The King of Fighters XI. Playstation 2. SNK Playmore. Elizabeth: Ash Crimson! Have you forgotten your mission?! /.../ Ash: You're as scary as ever, aren't you? But don't think that you can bully me. You want to know why? Because... I'm not the person I used to be./ Elisabeth: !! That color! Iori Yagami's flames? No, it can't be... Orochi? /.../ Ash: When Kyo wakes up, tell him something for me. Tell him he's next.
  9. ^ "King of Fighters skipping 2004". GameSpot. December 23, 2004. Retrieved September 4, 2008.
  10. ^ "サミーとSNKプレイモア業務提携!『KOF2004』は夏頃!?" (in Japanese). Gpaara. February 20, 2004. Archived from the original on June 3, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018.
  11. ^ "Interview with Ignition Entertainment's Shane Bettenhausen About The King of Fighters XII". DieHardGameFan. Archived from the original on April 29, 2009. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  12. ^ "The King of Fighters XI en Atomiswave (Arcade)". Segarcadia. May 8, 2005. Archived from the original on May 28, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  13. ^ "KOF XI arcade cabinet". Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  14. ^ "Archived copy" 天童凱 (in Japanese). King of Fighters 10th anniversary website. Archived from the original on December 18, 2008. Retrieved February 2, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  15. ^ "Archived copy" ズィルバー (in Japanese). King of Fighters 10th anniversary website. Archived from the original on December 18, 2008. Retrieved February 2, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  16. ^ "Archived copy" 禍忌 (in Japanese). King of Fighters 10th anniversary website. Archived from the original on December 18, 2008. Retrieved February 2, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link) CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  17. ^ "桃子". SNK Playmore. Archived from the original on December 18, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  18. ^ "エリザベート・ブラントルシュ". SNK Playmore. Archived from the original on December 18, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  19. ^ "The King of the Fighters is Back". GameSpot. September 8, 2006. Archived from the original on March 29, 2009. Retrieved February 2, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  20. ^ "SNK PLAYMORE USA Ships THE KING OF FIGHTERS XI for PlayStation2 System". SNK Playmore. November 13, 2007. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved February 2, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  21. ^ "News: KOF XI non-progressive scan". InsertCredit. Archived from the original on February 20, 2008. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  22. ^ "総勢47人のキャラによる大バトル!『KOF XI』がPS2に" (in Japanese). Gpara. Archived from the original on December 31, 2007. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  23. ^ "The King of Fighters XI". GiantBomb. Retrieved November 3, 2008.
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  25. ^ "ザ・キング・オブ・ファイターズXI サウンドコレクション" (in Japanese). SNK Playmore. Archived from the original on February 23, 2009. Retrieved March 5, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  26. ^ a b "The King of Fighters XI". Metacritic. Archived from the original on March 29, 2009. Retrieved February 24, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  27. ^ a b c d e "The King of Fighters XI Review". Eurogamer. July 14, 2007. Archived from the original on January 22, 2009. Retrieved January 15, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  28. ^ NEW GAME CROSS REVIEW – ザ・キング・オブ・ファイターズ イレブン. Weekly Famitsu, No.915. Pg.57. 30 June 2006.
  29. ^ a b c Park, Andrew (December 19, 2007). "The King of Fighters XI Review". GameSpot. Archived from the original on January 23, 2009. Retrieved January 15, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  30. ^ a b c d e Clements, Ryan (December 18, 2007). "The King of Fighters XI Review". IGN. Archived from the original on December 28, 2008. Retrieved January 15, 2009. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  31. ^ a b c d e "The King of Fighters XI review". GamesRadar+. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  32. ^ a b "Analisis -The King of Fighters XI". Meristation. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  33. ^ a b c d "The King of Fighters XI review". Cheat Code Central. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  34. ^ a b c "La fuerza de las tradiciones". uVeJuegos.com. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  35. ^ a b c "The King of Fighters XI Review". GameRevolution. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  36. ^ a b c "King of Fighters XI – PS2 – Review". GameRevolution. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  37. ^ "Opinion: The Late Blooming Of The 'Hardcore' PS2". Gamasutra. Archived from the original on November 4, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  38. ^ "Japan game charts: June 19–25". GameSpot. Archived from the original on November 5, 2018. Retrieved November 4, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  39. ^ "2006年テレビゲームソフト売り上げTOP500(ファミ通版)". Geimin. Archived from the original on May 6, 2012. Retrieved September 18, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  40. ^ "8. The King of Fighters XI — The 25 Best SNK Fighting Games Ever Made". Complex. Archived from the original on September 22, 2012. Retrieved September 26, 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  41. ^ "The King of Fighters XII Preview". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on January 10, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  42. ^ "The King of Fighters XIII Interview". PlayStation Blog. Archived from the original on November 4, 2011. Retrieved November 3, 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)

External links[edit]