Page semi-protected

The Last of Us Part II

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The Last of Us Part II
TLOU P2 Box Art 2.png
Cover art featuring the protagonist, Ellie
Developer(s)Naughty Dog
Publisher(s)Sony Interactive Entertainment
Director(s)
Designer(s)
  • Emilia Schatz
  • Richard Cambier
Programmer(s)
  • Travis McIntosh
  • Christian Gyrling
Artist(s)
  • Erick Pangilinan
  • John Sweeney
  • Christian Nakata
Writer(s)
Composer(s)Gustavo Santaolalla
Platform(s)PlayStation 4
ReleaseJune 19, 2020
Genre(s)Action-adventure, survival horror
Mode(s)Single-player

The Last of Us Part II is a 2020 action-adventure game developed by Naughty Dog and published by Sony Interactive Entertainment for the PlayStation 4. Set five years after The Last of Us (2013), players control two characters in a post-apocalyptic United States: 19-year-old Ellie, who sets out for revenge, and Abby, a mercenary involved in a conflict between a militia and a cult. The game contains survival horror elements and is played from the third-person perspective. Players can use firearms, improvised weapons, and stealth to defend against enemies and cannibalistic creatures infected by a mutated strain of the Cordyceps fungus.

The six-year development of Part II began in 2014, soon after the release of The Last of Us Remastered. Neil Druckmann returned as creative director and Gustavo Santaolalla returned to compose the score. The game was announced in December 2016 and delayed twice, first for further development and then due to logistical problems arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. It was released on June 19, 2020, to critical acclaim. Praise was directed towards the improved gameplay mechanics, story, visual fidelity, and the performances of its cast, though the aspects of the narrative and presentation of its themes was criticized.

Gameplay

The Last of Us Part II is an action-adventure survival horror game played from the third-person perspective.[1][2] Players can use firearms, bows, improvised weapons, and stealth to defend against hostile humans and cannibalistic creatures infected by a mutated strain of the Cordyceps fungus. The gameplay mechanics in Part II have also expanded upon its predecessor, The Last of Us. In it the player character can traverse the environment more openly by being able to reach higher vantage points by jumping and climbing while playing as Ellie and Abby.[3] Players can also crawl in a prone position to evade enemies.[3] Throughout the game, players may have non-player characters assisting them.[4]

The game also sees the return of "Listen Mode" allowing players to locate enemies through a heightened sense of hearing and spatial awareness, indicated as outlines visible through walls and objects.[3] Additionally, players can collect supplements to upgrade skills in a skill tree.[3] The three main branches of the tree are Survival, Crafting, and Stealth.[3] Survival upgrades improve health, Listen Mode's range, and throw distance.[3] Crafting upgrades allow for melee upgrades, increase to Ellie's crafting speed, and the ability to craft smoke and stun bombs.[3] Stealth upgrades improve prone movement speed, faster stealth kills, and unlock pistol silencers.[3] Part II also introduces guard dogs that can track the player's scent.[3]

Plot

Most of civilization has been destroyed by a mutant Cordyceps fungus, which transforms its human hosts into aggressive creatures known as the Infected. Five years ago, Joel Miller escorted the teenager Ellie, who is immune, to a hospital run by the Fireflies, a rebel militia, in hopes of developing a cure. Learning the Fireflies would kill Ellie to create a vaccine, Joel killed them and escaped with an unconscious Ellie, later lying that a cure was impossible. Now living in a settlement in Jackson, Wyoming, Joel confesses his guilt to his brother Tommy.

Abby leads members of the Washington Liberation Front (WLF) militia to the outskirts of Jackson, seeking revenge against Joel for murdering her father, a Firefly surgeon. After Abby is rescued from Infected by Joel and Tommy, she takes them back to the WLF group. Meanwhile, Ellie and her girlfriend Dina leave Jackson in search of the brothers. Ellie enters the WLF camp to witness Abby beat Joel to death, and swears revenge.

Tommy heads to the WLF base in Seattle, and Ellie and Dina secretly follow him. After escaping a WLF ambush, the pair retreat to a theater, where Ellie reveals her immunity to Dina and learns that Dina is pregnant. The next day, with Dina sick, Ellie pursues Tommy alone and encounters Dina's ex-boyfriend Jesse, who has followed them to Seattle. Evading the Seraphites, a cult fighting the WLF for control for Seattle, Ellie tracks another WLF member, Nora, to a hospital, and tortures her for information. Realizing Nora is a former Firefly, Ellie recalls how, two years ago, she returned to the Firefly hospital and learned the truth. The next day, Jesse leaves to pursue Tommy, and Ellie heads to Abby's hideout at an aquarium. After a struggle, Ellie kills Abby's allies Mel, who is pregnant, and Owen. Returning to the theater, Ellie, Dina, Jesse and Tommy are ambushed by Abby, who kills Jesse and holds Tommy hostage.

Three days earlier, Abby learns that Owen has gone missing while investigating the Seraphites. The WLF leader, Isaac, believes he may have defected, and plans to assault the Seraphites' island settlement. Searching for Owen, Abby is captured and witnesses the Seraphites shatter the arm of a runaway Seraphite, Yara. After being rescued by Yara's younger brother Lev, they arrive at the aquarium, where Abby finds Owen. He plans to sail to Santa Barbara, where the Fireflies were supposedly regrouping. Yara's arm requires amputation, so Abby and Lev retrieve medical supplies from the hospital, which is overrun by Infected. Lev runs away to the Seraphite settlement to convince their mother to leave the cult. Abby and Yara pursue him, fending off an attack from Tommy. At the settlement, they discover Lev has killed his devout mother in self-defense. As the WLF attack the settlement, Yara kills Isaac and sacrifices herself to let Abby and Lev escape. Abby and Lev return to the aquarium to find Owen and Mel killed and a map leading to Ellie's theater hideout.

In the present, Abby shoots Tommy and overpowers Ellie and Dina. Learning that Dina is pregnant, Abby spares them at Lev's insistence and warns them to leave. Some time later, Ellie and Dina are living on a farm, taking care of Dina's baby, but Ellie suffers from post-traumatic stress. When Tommy arrives with information on Abby's whereabouts, Ellie leaves for Santa Barbara to kill her, despite Dina's pleas. Abby and Lev arrive in Santa Barbara searching for the Fireflies, but are captured by the Rattlers, slave-keeping bandits. Ellie is injured in a Rattler trap but escapes and rescues Abby and Lev, who have been weakened by weeks of torture. Threatening to kill Lev, Ellie forces Abby to fight her. Ellie overpowers her, losing two fingers in the process, but lets her live. Ellie returns to the farmhouse and finds it empty. She plays Joel's guitar, recalls her promise to Joel to try to forgive him, and leaves.

Development

Baker and Johnson reprise their roles as Joel and Ellie respectively

Development of The Last of Us Part II began in 2014, soon after the release of The Last of Us Remastered.[5] Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson reprised their roles as Joel and Ellie, respectively. Neil Druckmann reprised his positions as creative director and writer from The Last of Us; however, this time he co-wrote the story with Halley Gross, who was also narrative lead in the game.[6][7][8] Bruce Straley, game director on the original game, left Naughty Dog in 2017.[9][10] Anthony Newman and Kurt Margenau were selected to be game directors for Part II;[11] Newman was previously the melee combat designer for The Last of Us, and Margenau was game director on Uncharted: The Lost Legacy. Josh Scherr who previously worked as writer on all the games in the Uncharted series except for Uncharted 3: Drake's Deception, worked on this game as narrative designer and additional writer.[12] Gustavo Santaolalla returns to compose and perform the score.[13] Plans for multiplayer were cancelled because resources were shifted to improving the scale of the game.[14] Naughty Dog stated that The Last of Us Part II was the longest game they had made.[15]

Druckmann and Santaolalla reprise their roles as creative director and composer respectively

The Last of Us Part II was announced at the PlayStation Experience event in December 2016.[16] The first trailer revealed the return of Ellie and Joel, whose story takes place five years after the first game. It was revealed that players will control 19-year-old Ellie, who was playable for some sections of the first game, though Joel was the primary playable character.[17] Motion capture began in 2017.[7]

In early interviews, Druckmann said that whereas the first game was a story about love, Part II was about hate.[18] He later said the story was really about empathy and forgiveness.[19] By opening the game with Abby killing Joel, the team hoped that players would initially hate her and share Ellie's thirst for revenge. Then, by having players control Abby for the second half, they would come to understand her position and realize the futility of their fight.[19] Druckmann cited the reveal of Raiden as the main playable character in Metal Gear Solid 2 (2001) as an inspiration for the change in perspective.[20] He hoped the story would be compelling, but that players would "feel the weight of their actions in a way that's different from other action games".[19] He said that the staff had many debates about the story, and predicted that it would divide audiences: "I think raises those philosophical questions and asks the players to interpret some of the material that's there and see where they stand on those questions."[21]

Soon after the release of The Lost Legacy in August 2017, the entire Naughty Dog team focused on Part II.[22][23] The second trailer was released in October 2017 as a part of Paris Games Week. It revealed four new characters: Yara (played by Victoria Grace), Lev (Ian Alexander), Emily (Emily Swallow), and Abby (Laura Bailey), whose name was not yet revealed.[24][25] Druckmann stated that the characters "are integral to [Ellie and Joel's] next journey".[26] The game was featured at Sony's E3 2018 event.[27] Another trailer was featured in the State of Play, a presentation concerning upcoming PlayStation games, in September 2019.[28]

According to a report by Kotaku's Jason Schreier, who spoke to anonymous Naughty Dog employees, the development saw high levels of crunch. Schreier suggested that development slowed due to the high turnover following the development of Uncharted 4: A Thief's End and said that some employees privately hoped Part II would fail to end the company culture of overwork. Naughty Dog was granted an additional two weeks of development for bug fixes.[29] The game went gold on May 4, allowing for discs to be manufactured.[30][31]

Release and promotion

The Last of Us Part II was originally scheduled for release on February 21, 2020, but was delayed to May 29, 2020, in October 2019.[32] Sony announced five editions: standard, special, collector's, digital deluxe and an Ellie edition.[33] Different editions come with different collectors' items as well as items and unlocked abilities in Part II, in addition to a bonus for pre-ordering the game.[33] On May 6, Naughty Dog released a story trailer featuring Joel and Ellie after an attack on the town of Jackson.[34] From May 13 to June 3, Naughty Dog released a series of making-of videos.[18]

Naughty Dog were keen to keep the plot secret, and altered scenes in trailers to create the impression that Joel had greater presence in the story.[35][20] Naughty Dog's review embargo forbade reviewers from revealing plot elements such as the fates of characters or the inciting incident.[36] On April 27, several videos leaked online, showing cutscenes, gameplay and plot details.[37] Druckmann tweeted that he was "heartbroken" for fans and for the team, who had devoted years to development.[38] A few days later, Sony stated that it had identified the leakers and that they were not affiliated with Sony or Naughty Dog.[39] According to Schreier, hackers had used a security weakness in a previous Naughty Dog game to penetrate Naughty Dog's servers.[40]

On April 2, 2020, Naughty Dog announced that The Last of Us Part II was almost complete but had been indefinitely delayed due to logistical problems caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.[41] The final release date was announced on April 27.[42]

The Last of Us Part 2 was banned in the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia for its gay characters. This has been attributed to the countries' conservative traditions regarding homosexuality.[43] The Japanese release removed the sex scene between Abby and Owen.[44]

Reception

Pre-release

While the second trailer was well received,[45][25] it drew some criticism for its violence.[46] Sony Interactive Entertainment Europe president Jim Ryan defended the trailer, saying the game is made by and for adults.[47] Druckmann explained: "We're making a game about the cycle of violence and we're making a statement about violent actions and the impact they have ... [the idea] was for the player to feel repulsed by some of the violence they are committing themselves."[48]

The cutscene featured in the 2018 E3 presentation in which Ellie kisses another woman, Dina. The game was praised for this kiss—frequently considered to be difficult to animate—passionate and believable.[49][50]

Critical response

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
Metacritic94/100[51][a]
Review scores
PublicationScore
Destructoid8.5/10[52]
Game Informer10/10[53]
GameRevolution3.5/5 stars[54]
GameSpot8/10[55]
GamesRadar+5/5 stars[56]
IGN10/10[57]
Push Square10/10[58]
USgamer4.5/5 stars[59]
VentureBeat95/100[60]
VG2475/5 stars[61]

The Last of Us Part II was praised for its improved gameplay, graphical fidelity, story, and cast performances. Jonathon Dornbush of IGN called it "a masterpiece worthy of its predecessor" and wrote that "it delivers a layered, emotionally shattering story on top of stealth and action gameplay that improves the first game's mechanics [... and] still makes time for a stunning, nuanced exploration of the strength and fragility of the human spirit".[57] Andy McNamara of Game Informer concurred, calling it "the best narrative game I have played" and "a sequel unlike any other, taking video game storytelling to new heights."[53] Kaity Kline of NPR called the game an "emotional rollercoaster" and writing: "I think The Last of Us Part II has changed me a bit as a person. It made me very aware of the little things in my life that I take for granted, the kinds of things you don't appreciate until they're ripped away forever."[62] Kallie Plagge of GameSpot called it "beautiful and devastating", and wrote that "the more I reflect on it, the more I appreciate the story and characters at its core."[55]

Christopher Byrd of The Washington Post called The Last of Us Part II "an astonishing achievement — a searing demonstration of how a video game can marry heart-stopping gameplay, gorgeous environmental storytelling and anxiety-inducing moral complexity. [...] The Last of Us Part II is not a game about zombies. It's a meditation on loss — not simply loss of life, but of community, family, and individual capabilities — and the effort it takes to muddle through maddening grief." Andrew Webster of The Verge wrote, "The Last of Us Part II is uncomfortable and exhausting, but that's what makes it great [...] those dark, disturbing moments are what make The Last of Us Part II so powerful. It's not just a game about violence. It's one that grapples with the impact of that violence and shows players the consequences."[63] The performances of its motion capture cast was praised by The Guardian's Keza MacDonald, who said that much of the game's effectiveness was "the result of some fine acting from The Last of Us Part II's human stars, and the immense technical skill on show in translating those performances to the screen [...] It is rare in games for the moments when you're not playing to be as memorable as those when you are."[64]

Some reviewers criticized the narrative, character development, and themes of violence and revenge. Maddy Myers of Polygon said it was "a story about characters who seem unable to learn or grow", and that it was self-defeating to make players feel guilty for violence when the game forces the player to use violence.[65] Riley MacLeod of Kotaku wrote, "I paused the game and asked myself aloud if the developers thought I was stupid, if they thought the existence of violence had just never occurred to me before." He felt it was less accomplished than The Last of Us.[66] Rob Zacny of Vice felt the game was "poorly served by a Naughty Dog house style that has become less a signature than a straitjacket". He felt the story did not fully explore its characters, writing: "Nobody ever reconsiders their quest for vengeance. Everyone acts under a kind of vindictive compulsion that goes little remarked and unexamined."[67] Zacny felt the scene in which Ellie leaves her idyllic life with Dina to pursue Abby again "paint[s] her not as a tragic antihero, but as an outright monster", reinforcing that Ellie's fate "could have been avoided with a modicum of introspection or awareness".[68] Moreover, GameRevolution's Michael Leri opined that the new characters were mostly mediocre and that the story attempts to do too much and goes on for too long.[54] Jeuxvideo.com wrote that characters such as Jesse and Manny lacked development and were simply used to advance the narrative.[69]

Members of the transgender community objected to the representation of Lev, a transgender boy. Criticism focused on the use of Lev's dead name by villains, that he was created by cisgender writers, and the use of trans stories as tragedies.[70] Writing for Paste, Waverly praised the choice to have Lev played by a transgender actor, but felt there was too much emphasis on Lev's gender identity and the suffering he experienced for it. Waverly felt that "it seems like the only reason trans people are made broadly visible is to make cis voyeurs feel good about themselves [...] Lev’s story isn’t made for trans people, but to give cisgender players a space to connect with their guilt and pity for trans people."[71] In contrast, Stacey Henley of VG247 wrote that: "Lev’s story is far from being perfect. But it’s a major step for trans characters in gaming, focuses on a highly charismatic and central character who is far more than this transness [...] Lev has emerged from The Last of Us Part 2 as one of the most important characters in modern gaming."[70] Kotaku's Riley MacLeod saw Lev's character as simply a way of the game acknowledging trans people exist and wrote that it was up to players to create their own meaning from the character.[72]

Audience response

The game was the subject of review-bombing on Metacritic, resulting in a user review score of 3.4/10 at its nadir.[73][74] Reporters noticed the review bomb occurred shortly after the game launched and observed that it was too early for these users to feasibly have finished the game by this time;[75] some suggested that users' ratings in this time period were primarily based on the incomplete information contained within the plot leak.[74][69] Commentators found that many of the negative reviews criticized the characterization and plot.[75][73][76][77] Others noted that a proportion made statements about the perceived "social justice warrior" politics, and observed that some of the more vitriol responses focused on the presence of LGBT characters and diversity within the game.[69][73] CNET's Daniel Van Boom wrote that despite the vocal proportion of fans making such claims, the review bombers do not represent the majority of players who otherwise have no problem with diversity.[78] Writing in Kotaku, Riley MacLeod noted that Metacritic's opaque system that focuses on scores over review content "fails to take into account the diverse critical opinions of the game", thereby in the case of the game creating a situation that "shows a bunch of meaningless numbers and a lot of rage, very little of which paint any picture of how players are actually finding the game".[75]

The character of Abby, who is both an antagonist and a playable character, was controversial among players, who had expected to control Ellie for the majority of the game.[79] Writing for Collider, Dave Trumbore felt that Abby had been unfairly maligned by audiences and that they had failed to understand the story's message and subtext.[80] Some players criticized Abby's muscular physique, and theories spread online that she was transgender; Polygon's Patricia Hernandez argued that this perception was a result of the lack of body diversity in games, and that the story showed Abby had the resources to achieve her physique.[81] According to Hernandez, a disproportionate amount of the Abby criticism focused on her body, and not her role in the story.[82] Laura Bailey, who played Abby, received online death threats.[82]

In another article, Hernandez observed that the discourse surrounding The Last of Us Part II had become adversarial, with "bigots" attacking the game for its diverse cast and Naughty Dog becoming defensive to criticism.[36] Druckmann and other Naughty Dog staff received death threats and transphobic and antisemitic abuse.[82] In response to his critical Vice review, Sony contacted Rob Zacny on behalf of Naughty Dog to discuss his criticisms, which they disagreed with; Zacny said the discussion, while cordial, was unusual from a large publisher. On Twitter, Druckmann expressed disapproval at journalists mocking a comparison of The Last of Us Part II to the film Schindler's List. After Schreier tweeted "Video games are too long", referring to The Last of Us Part II, Troy Baker responded with a quote from US president Theodore Roosevelt about critics being less valuable than creators. Hernandez concluded that this was "not an environment that is conducive to encouraging honest reviews or critical discussion, which is ultimately a disservice to the game itself".[36] Kat Bailey for US Gamer wrote how the lack of meaningful critical discourse surrounding the game also extended to publications' own reviews of it, noting how Sony's embargo had prohibited them from discussing large portions of its story, and without spoilers, such articles failed to become a means of evoking in-depth discussions on the game.[83]

Sales

In the UK, Part II became the fastest-selling PlayStation 4 game, outselling previous record-holder Uncharted 4 by at least 1% in physical sales, and outselling the original Last of Us by 76%.[84] In Japan, it was the bestselling game during its first week, selling an estimated 178,696 copies.[85] Neither of these figures include digital sales.[84][85] In its release weekend, the game sold over 4 million copies worldwide, becoming the fastest-selling PlayStation 4 exclusive, beating Marvel's Spider-Man's 3.3 million and God of War's 3.1 million in the same period.[86][87]

Awards

In 2017, The Last of Us Part II was named Most Anticipated Game of the Year by readers of the PlayStation Blog,[88] Most Wanted Game at the Golden Joystick Awards,[89] and Most Anticipated Game at The Game Awards;[90] in 2018, it was awarded Most Anticipated Game at the Gamers' Choice Awards,[91] and nominated for Most Wanted Game at the Golden Joystick Awards.[92] It received Special Commendations for Graphics[b] and Sound at the Game Critics Awards in July 2018.[93]

Date Award Category Result Ref.
November 17, 2017 Golden Joystick Awards Most Wanted Game Won [89]
December 7, 2017 The Game Awards Most Anticipated Game Won [90]
July 2, 2018 Game Critics Awards Special Commendation for Graphics Won[b] [93]
Special Commendation for Sound Won [93]
November 16, 2018 Golden Joystick Awards Most Wanted Game Nominated [92]

Notes

  1. ^ Based on 113 scored reviews of 124 total reviews
  2. ^ a b Also awarded to Cyberpunk 2077 and Ghost of Tsushima.[93]

References

  1. ^ Schreier, Jason (October 24, 2019). "Sources: The Last of Us 2 Delayed To Spring [UPDATE: Confirmed]". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on December 11, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2020.
  2. ^ Dekker, Jacob (September 27, 2019). "The Last Of Us Part 2 - What We Thought Of The Demo". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on September 28, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Turi, Tim (September 26, 2019). "Hands-on with The Last of Us Part II, new gameplay details revealed". PlayStation.Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on October 1, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2020.
  4. ^ Espineli, Matt; Plagge, Kallie; Watts, Steve (April 27, 2020). "The Last Of Us 2: New Release Date, Gameplay, Impressions, And What You Need To Know". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  5. ^ Kim, Matt (April 17, 2019). "The Last of Us Part 2 Has Finished Shooting Its Final Scene". USGamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on May 8, 2019. Retrieved May 8, 2019.
  6. ^ Makuch, Eddie (December 5, 2016). "The Last of Us 2 Brings on Westworld Writer; Story Described as "Intense"". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 7, 2016. Retrieved December 7, 2016.
  7. ^ a b Boatman, Brandon (April 15, 2017). "The Last of Us Part II MoCap Has Begun Shooting". Hardcore Gamer. DoubleJump Publishing. Archived from the original on April 18, 2017. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  8. ^ Dornbush, Jonathon (September 27, 2019). "The Last of Us Part 2 Creative Director on Joel's Role, Ellie's New Relationship". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on September 26, 2019. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  9. ^ Makuch, Eddie (December 4, 2016). "The Last of Us 2: Bruce Straley Not Returning to Direct". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on March 12, 2017. Retrieved December 7, 2016.
  10. ^ Brightman, James (September 13, 2017). "Naughty Dog's Bruce Straley leaves the studio". Gamesindustry.biz. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on September 14, 2017. Retrieved September 14, 2017.
  11. ^ Wells, Evan (March 9, 2018). "An Update from Studio President Evan Wells". Naughty Dog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on March 10, 2018. Retrieved March 10, 2018.
  12. ^ Takahashi, Dean (June 14, 2018). "The Last of Us Part II game directors unravel their E3 demo for us". VentureBeat. Archived from the original on June 14, 2018. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  13. ^ Pereira, Chris (December 3, 2016). "In The Last of Us: Part 2, You Play as Ellie". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on March 12, 2017. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  14. ^ Silver, Dan (September 26, 2019). "The Last of Us Part 2 exclusive interview: Neil Druckmann on Ellie sexuality, video game violence and the 'death' of Joel". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Archived from the original on September 26, 2019. Retrieved September 26, 2019.
  15. ^ Ramée, Jordan (September 25, 2019). "The Last Of Us Part 2 Is Naughty Dog's Longest Game". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on September 26, 2019. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  16. ^ Druckmann, Neil (December 3, 2016). "The Last of Us Part II". PlayStation Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on December 3, 2016. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  17. ^ Robinson, Martin (December 3, 2016). "Ellie is the lead character in The Last of Us Part 2". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on December 4, 2016. Retrieved December 4, 2016.
  18. ^ a b Lowe, Scott (May 13, 2020). "Introducing "Inside The Last of Us Part II" Video Series". PlayStation.Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  19. ^ a b c Wilson, Aoife (July 1, 2020). "A spoiler-heavy interview with The Last of Us Part 2 director Neil Druckmann". Eurogamer. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  20. ^ a b "The Last of Us 2 director explains its strict review embargo and sneaky trailers". GameRevolution. June 25, 2020. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  21. ^ May 2020, Rachel Weber 13. "Last of Us 2 could be "more divisive than the first" says director in new video deep dive". GamesRadar. Retrieved July 1, 2020.
  22. ^ Druckmann, Neil (October 30, 2017). "The Last of Us Part II Interview: A New Look at the World of The Last of Us". YouTube. Archived from the original on April 9, 2019. Retrieved March 14, 2020. It's been almost a year since we announced The Last of Us Part II. It's been hard being quiet for so long. If you know, in the meantime, we put out a little game called Uncharted: The Lost Legacy. And with that finally out there and people playing it and enjoying it, the entire studio is now on The Last of Us Part II. We're in full production.
  23. ^ Sliva, Marty (August 17, 2017). "Uncharted: The Lost Legacy Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on January 3, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  24. ^ Osborn, Alex (October 30, 2017). "The Last of Us 2 Voice Cast Revealed". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on October 30, 2017. Retrieved October 31, 2017.
  25. ^ a b Saed, Sherif (October 30, 2017). "The Last of Us Part 2 trailer is maybe the best thing shown today – watch it here". VG247. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on November 9, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  26. ^ Druckmann, Neil (October 30, 2017). "The Last of Us Part II – Another Piece of the Puzzle". PlayStation Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on October 31, 2017. Retrieved October 31, 2017.
  27. ^ Moyse, Chris (May 22, 2018). "Naughty Dog tweet teases The Last of Us Part II reveal at E3". Destructoid. Enthusiast Gaming. Archived from the original on May 1, 2019. Retrieved May 27, 2018.
  28. ^ Sheridan, Connor (September 24, 2019). "The Last of Us Part 2 trailer brutally reveals why Ellie's killing everybody". GamesRadar+. Future plc. Archived from the original on September 25, 2019. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  29. ^ Schreier, Jason (March 12, 2020). "As Naughty Dog Crunches On The Last Of Us II, Developers Wonder How Much Longer This Approach Can Last". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on March 12, 2020. Retrieved March 13, 2020.
  30. ^ Dornbush, Jonathon (May 4, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 Has Gone Gold". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  31. ^ Gera, Emily (May 4, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 goes gold ahead of its release next month". VG247. Archived from the original on May 4, 2020. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  32. ^ Dornbush, Jonathon (April 2, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 Delayed Indefinitely, No New Release Date Set". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on April 2, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  33. ^ a b Druckmann, Neil (September 24, 2019). "The Last of Us Part II Arrives on February 21, 2020". PlayStation Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on September 24, 2019. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  34. ^ Hood, Vic (May 6, 2020). "The Last of Us 2's new story trailer will get you hyped for a GOTY contender". TechRadar. Future plc. Archived from the original on May 6, 2020. Retrieved May 6, 2020.
  35. ^ "Naughty Dog Showed A Fake Last Of Us 2 Scene To Preserve One Of The Game's Surprises". Kotaku. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  36. ^ a b c Hernandez, Patricia. "The Last of Us Part 2 has become a minefield". Polygon. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  37. ^ Avard, Alex; Sheridan, Connor (April 27, 2020). "The Last of Us 2 gameplay leaks online, contains major story spoilers". GamesRadar+. Future plc. Archived from the original on April 27, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  38. ^ Hernandez, Patricia (April 27, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 leak seems to show massive spoilers". Polygon. Vox Media. Archived from the original on April 28, 2020. Retrieved April 28, 2020.
  39. ^ Taylor, Haydn (May 1, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 leaked online". GamesIndustry.biz. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on May 1, 2020. Retrieved May 1, 2020.
  40. ^ Tailby, Stephen (May 3, 2020). "The Last of Us 2 Leaks Apparently Released by Hackers, Not Affiliated with Naughty Dog". Push Square. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on May 3, 2020. Retrieved May 3, 2020.
  41. ^ Schreier, Jason (April 2, 2020). "The Last of Us II Delayed Indefinitely". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on April 2, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  42. ^ Wales, Matt (April 27, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 gets new June release date". Eurogamer. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on April 27, 2020. Retrieved April 27, 2020.
  43. ^ Maher, Cian (June 21, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 is banned in the UAE because of Ellie and Dina's relationship". VG247. Archived from the original on June 24, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  44. ^ "Japanese Release of The Last of Us Part II Censors Abby Sex Scene". Bounding Into Comics.
  45. ^ Hood, Vic (March 5, 2020). "The Last of Us 2 release date, trailers, news and rumors". TechRadar. Future plc. Archived from the original on March 14, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  46. ^ Dwan, Hannah (October 30, 2017). "The Last of Us Part 2's Paris Games Week trailer is a brutally violent introduction". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Archived from the original on November 1, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  47. ^ Silver, Dan (October 31, 2017). "PlayStation defends domestic abuse in trailers: "A game made by adults, to be played by adults"". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Archived from the original on November 9, 2017. Retrieved November 9, 2017.
  48. ^ Totilo, Stephen (June 13, 2018). "We Talked To The Last Of Us Part II's Director About The Game's Violence (And More Treacherous Stealth)". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  49. ^ Plunkett, Luke (June 12, 2018). "A Kiss Has Been One Of The Stars Of 2018". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  50. ^ Hernandez, Patricia (June 11, 2018). "Naughty Dog explains how it made that Last of Us II kiss look so real". The Verge. Vox Media. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved June 12, 2018.
  51. ^ "The Last of Us Part II for PlayStation 4 Reviews". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  52. ^ Carter, Chris (June 12, 2020). "Review: The Last of Us Part II". Destructoid. Enthusiast Gaming. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  53. ^ a b McNamara, Andy (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part II". Game Informer. GameStop. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  54. ^ a b Leri, Michael (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us 2 Review | A Bloater stuffed to the brim". GameRevolution. AtomicOnline. Archived from the original on June 13, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  55. ^ a b Plagge, Kallie (June 12, 2020). "The Last Of Us Part II Review (Spoiler-Free)". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  56. ^ Avard, Alex (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 review: "An astonishing, absurdly ambitious epic"". GamesRadar+. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  57. ^ a b Dornbush, Jonathon (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 Review". IGN. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  58. ^ Barker, Sammy (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us: Part II Review (PS4)". Push Square. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  59. ^ Bailey, Kat (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 Review: An Emotional Reckoning And a Worthy Sequel". USgamer. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  60. ^ Takahashi, Dean (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part II review: A brilliant game that is not what it seems". VentureBeat. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  61. ^ McKeand, Kirk (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 review – a generation-defining masterpiece". VG247. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  62. ^ Kline, Kaity (June 18, 2020). "'The Last Of Us Part II' Is A Gut Punch That Just Keeps Punching". NPR. Retrieved June 19, 2020.
  63. ^ Webster, Andrew (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part II is uncomfortable and exhausting, but that's what makes it great". The Verge. Retrieved June 23, 2020.
  64. ^ MacDonald, Keza (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 review – post-apocalyptic game is groundbreaking and powerful". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved June 23, 2020.
  65. ^ Myers, Maddy (June 12, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 review: We're better than this". Polygon. Vox Media. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  66. ^ MacLeod, Riley (June 12, 2020). "The Last Of Us Part 2: The Kotaku Review". Kotaku. Archived from the original on June 12, 2020. Retrieved June 12, 2020.
  67. ^ Zacny, Rob (June 12, 2020). "'The Last of Us Part II' Is a Grim and Bloody Spectacle, but a Poor Sequel". Vice. Retrieved June 19, 2020.
  68. ^ Zacny, Rob. "Where 'The Last of Us Part 2' Ending Goes Wrong". Vice. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  69. ^ a b c Logan (June 22, 2020). "The Last of Us Part II : Entre histoire viscérale et review bombing" [The Last of Us Part II: Between visceral history and review bombing]. Jeuxvideo.com (in French). Webedia. Archived from the original on June 24, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  70. ^ a b Henley, Stacey (June 23, 2020). "Lev, The Last of Us Part 2, and imperfectly important representation (spoilers)". VG247. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 23, 2020.
  71. ^ Waverly. "The Cisgender Voyeurism of The Last of Us Part II". Paste. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  72. ^ MacLeod, Riley. "I Have Mixed Feelings About The Last Of Us Part 2's Trans Character". Kotaku. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  73. ^ a b c Nunneley, Stephany (June 19, 2020). "The Last of Us: Part 2 has been review bombed on Metacritic". VG247. Archived from the original on June 21, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  74. ^ a b Croft, Liam (June 20, 2020). "The Last of Us 2 Review Bombing Continues, Online Discourse Increasingly Ugly". Push Square. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on June 23, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  75. ^ a b c MacLeod, Riley (June 20, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2's Metacritic Page Shows How Broken Numerical Scores Are". Kotaku. G/O Media. Archived from the original on June 24, 2020. Retrieved June 23, 2020.
  76. ^ Dedmon, Tanner. "The Last of Us Part 2 Gets Review Bombed". Comic Book. Retrieved June 28, 2020.
  77. ^ Koepp, Brent. "Naughty Dog's Neil Druckmann responds to angry The Last of Us 2 reviews". Dexerto. Retrieved June 28, 2020.
  78. ^ Van Boom, Daniel (June 23, 2020). "Why The Last of Us Part 2 is getting internet hate". CNET. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on June 23, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  79. ^ "Here's The Deal With The Last Of Us Part 2". Kotaku. Retrieved July 3, 2020.
  80. ^ Trumbore, Dave. "Why 'The Last of Us: Part II' Deserves to Be in the 'Game of the Year' Conversation". Collider. Retrieved July 4, 2020.
  81. ^ Hernandez, Patricia. "The Last of Us Part 2 proves gaming doesn't know how to deal with muscular women". Polygon. Retrieved July 2, 2020.
  82. ^ a b c Hernandez, Patricia (July 6, 2020). "The Last of Us 2 dev Naughty Dog condemns harassment, death threats". Polygon. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  83. ^ Bailey, Kat. "The Last of Us Part 2's Overly Limiting Embargo Only Hurts Critical Discourse". USGamer. Eurogamer. Retrieved July 4, 2020.
  84. ^ a b Dring, Christopher (June 21, 2020). "The Last of Us Part 2 smashes sales records - UK Charts". Gamesindustry.biz. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on June 22, 2020. Retrieved June 23, 2020.
  85. ^ a b Romano, Sal (June 25, 2020). "Famitsu Sales: 6/15/20 – 6/21/20". Gematsu. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  86. ^ Lempel, Eric (June 26, 2020). "The Last of Us Part II sells more than 4 million copies". PlayStation.Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on June 26, 2020. Retrieved June 26, 2020.
  87. ^ Tailby, Stephen (June 26, 2020). "The Last of Us 2 Is the Fastest Selling PS4 Exclusive Ever, Over 4 Million Sold in Three Days". Push Square. Gamer Network. Archived from the original on June 26, 2020. Retrieved June 26, 2020.
  88. ^ Massongill, Justin (January 12, 2017). "The Winners: PlayStation.Blog Game of the Year 2016". PlayStation Blog. Sony Interactive Entertainment. Archived from the original on January 17, 2017. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  89. ^ a b Chalk, Andy (November 17, 2017). "Here are your 2017 Golden Joystick Award winners". PC Gamer. Future plc. Archived from the original on November 18, 2017. Retrieved November 18, 2017.
  90. ^ a b Makuch, Eddie (December 8, 2017). "The Game Awards 2017 Winners Headlined By Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's Game Of The Year". GameSpot. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 9, 2017. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  91. ^ Sorrentino, Mike (December 9, 2018). "2018 Gamers' Choice Awards: How to watch, nominees, winners". CNET. CBS Interactive. Archived from the original on December 11, 2018. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  92. ^ a b Hoggins, Tom (September 24, 2018). "Golden Joysticks 2018 nominees announced, voting open now". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Archived from the original on September 24, 2018. Retrieved October 24, 2019.
  93. ^ a b c d Ashaari, Alleef (July 2, 2018). "PlayStation and PS4 Won E3 2018, According to Game Critics Awards". Game Revolution. CraveOnline. Archived from the original on July 8, 2018. Retrieved July 4, 2018.

External links