The Liberty Amendments

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The Liberty Amendments: Restoring the American Republic
Author Mark Levin
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Simon & Schuster
Publication date
August 13, 2013
Media type Print (Hardback), paperback, Kindle, Audio
Pages 272 (Hardcover)
ISBN 1451606273

The Liberty Amendments: Restoring the American Republic is a book by the American talk radio host and lawyer Mark Levin, published in 2013.[1] In it, Levin lays out and makes a case for eleven Constitutional amendments which he believes would restore the Constitution’s chief components: federalism, republicanism, and limited government.[2]

Summary[edit]

The eleven amendments proposed by Levin:[3][4]

  1. Impose Congressional term limits
  2. Repeal the Seventeenth Amendment, returning the election of Senators to state legislatures
  3. Impose term limits for Supreme Court Justices and restrict judicial review
  4. Require a balanced budget and limit federal spending and taxation
  5. Define a deadline to file taxes (one day before the next federal election)
  6. Subject federal departments and bureaucratic regulations to periodic reauthorization and review
  7. Create a more specific definition of the Commerce Clause
  8. Limit eminent domain powers
  9. Allow states to more easily amend the Constitution by bypassing Congress
  10. Create a process where two-thirds of the states can nullify federal laws
  11. Require photo ID to vote and limit early voting

Levin would have these amendments proposed to the states by a convention of the states as described in Article Five of the Constitution.

Reception[edit]

The book debuted at #1 on The New York Times Best Seller list in all three categories for which it qualified.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ von Spakovsky, Hans (September 4, 2013). "Amendments for Liberty". National Review. Retrieved March 24, 2014. 
  2. ^ Gutzman, Kevin (September 27, 2013). "Do We Need a New Constitutional Convention?". The American Conservative. Retrieved March 24, 2014. 
  3. ^ Horowitz, Daniel (August 13, 2013). "Mark Levin's Liberty Amendments". RedState.com. Retrieved July 4, 2014. 
  4. ^ Jacobson, William (August 12, 2013). "The Liberty Amendments – Mark Levin's Constitutional Sequester". Legal Insurrection. Retrieved July 4, 2014. 
  5. ^ Smith, Kyle (September 1, 2013). "Why are major media outlets ignoring bestselling writer Mark R. Levin?". New York Post. Retrieved March 24, 2014. 

External links[edit]