Lomonosov Gold Medal

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Lomonosov Gold Medal

The Lomonosov Gold Medal, named after Russian scientist and polymath Mikhail Lomonosov, is awarded each year since 1959 for outstanding achievements in the natural sciences and the humanities by the USSR Academy of Sciences and later the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS). Since 1967, two medals are awarded annually: one to a Russian and one to a foreign scientist. It is the Academy's highest accolade.

Recipients of Lomonosov Gold Medal[edit]

1959[edit]

1961[edit]

1963[edit]

  • Sin-Itiro Tomonaga (member of the Japanese academy of Sciences, president of the Scientific Council of Japan) : for substantial scientific contributions to the development of physics.
  • Hideki Yukawa (member of the Japanese academy of Sciences, director of the Institute of Basic Research at the University of Kyoto) : for outstanding merits in the development of theoretical physics.

1964[edit]

  • Sir Howard Walter Florey (professor, president of the Royal Society of Great Britain) : for an outstanding contribution in the development of medicine.

1965[edit]

1967[edit]

  • Igor Yevgenyevich Tamm : for outstanding achievements in the theory of elementary particles and other domain of theoretical physics
  • Cecil Frank Powell (professor, member of the Royal Society of Great Britain) : for outstanding achievements in the physics of elementary particles.

1968[edit]

1969[edit]

1970[edit]

1971[edit]

  • Viktor Amazaspovich Ambartsumian : for outstanding achievements in astronomy and astrophysics.
  • Hannes Alfvén (professor, member of the Royal Academy of Sciences in Stockholm, Sweden) : for outstanding achievements in physics of plasma and astrophysics.

1972[edit]

  • Nikoloz Muskhelishvili : for outstanding achievements in mathematics and mechanics.
  • Max Steenbeck (full member of the Academy of Sciences of the German Democratic Republic) : for outstanding achievements in the physics of plasma and applied physics.

1973[edit]

1974[edit]

  • Aleksandr Ivanovich Tselikov : for outstanding achievements in metallurgy and metal technology.
  • Angel Balevski (full member of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences) : for outstanding achievements in metallurgy and metal technology.

1975[edit]

  • Mstislav Vsevolodovich Keldysh : for outstanding achievements in mathematics, mechanics and space research.
  • Maurice Roy (full member of the Académie française) : for outstanding achievements in mechanics and its applications.

1976[edit]

  • Semyon Isaakovich Volfkovich : for outstanding achievements in chemistry and the technology of phosphorus and the development of scientific foundations of chemicalization of agriculture in the USSR.
  • Herman Klare (full member of the Academy of Sciences of the German Democratic Republic) : for outstanding achievements in the chemistry and technology of man-made fibers.

1977[edit]

1978[edit]

1979[edit]

1980[edit]

  • Boris Yevgenevich Paton : for outstanding achievements in metallurgy and metal technology.
  • Jaroslav Kožešník (full member of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences) : for outstanding achievements in applied mathematics and mechanics.

1981[edit]

1982[edit]

1983[edit]

  • Andrei Lvovich Kursanov : for outstanding achievements in physiology and biochemistry of plants.
  • Abdus Salam (professor, Pakistan) : for outstanding achievements in physics.

1984[edit]

1985[edit]

1986[edit]

  • Svyatoslav Nikolaevich Fyodorov : for outstanding achievements in ophthalmology and eye microsurgery.
  • Josef Řiman (academician, Chairman of the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences) : for outstanding achievements in biochemistry.

1987[edit]

1988[edit]

  • Sergei Lvovich Sobolev (posthumously): for outstanding achievements in mathematics.
  • Jean Leray (professor, France): for outstanding achievements in mathematics.

1989[edit]

1993[edit]

1994[edit]

1995[edit]

  • Vitaly Lazarevich Ginzburg: for outstanding achievements in theoretical physics and astrophysics.
  • Anatole Abragam (professor, France): for outstanding achievements in physics of condensed state and methods of research in nuclear physics.

1996[edit]

1997[edit]

  • Boris Sergeyevich Sokolov: for outstanding achievements in the studies of the early biosphere of the Earth, the discovery of the ancient Wend geological system and classical works in fossil corals.
  • Frank Press (professor, United States): for outstanding achievements in the physics of solid Earth.

1998[edit]

  • Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn: for an outstanding contribution into the development of Russian literature, Russian language and Russian history.
  • Yosikazu Nakamura (professor, Japan): for an outstanding contribution to the study of Slavistics and the popularization of Russian literature and culture in Japan.

1999[edit]

2000[edit]

  • Andrei Viktorovich Gaponov-Grekhov: for fundamental works in the fields of electrodynamics, plasma physics and physical electronics.
  • Charles Hard Townes (professor, United States): for fundamental works in quantum electronics leading to the development of the maser and laser.

2001[edit]

  • Alexander Sergeevich Spirin: for achievements in the study of the structure of nucleic acids and the functions of ribosomes.
  • Alexander Rich (professor, United States): for achievements in the study of the structure of nucleic acids and the functions of ribosomes.

2002[edit]

2003[edit]

2004[edit]

  • Gury Ivanovich Marchuk: for his outstanding contribution to the creation of new models and methods of solving problems of nuclear-reactor physics, atmosphere and ocean physics.
  • Edward N. Lorenz (professor, United States): for major achievements in developing the theory of general circulation of the atmosphere and the theory of chaotic attractors of dissipative systems.[2]

2005[edit]

2006[edit]

2007[edit]

2008[edit]

2009[edit]

2010[edit]

2011[edit]

2012[edit]

  • Gleb Vsevolodovich Dobrovolsky : for outstanding contribution in the field of soil science.
  • Richard Warren Arnold (professor, United States): for his outstanding contribution to the development of theoretical and applied soil science and modeling the behavior of soils in different landscapes of the world.

2013[edit]

2014[edit]

  • Anatoly Derevyanko: for his outstanding contribution to the development of a new fundamental scientific concept formation of modern human physical type and its culture.
  • Svante Pääbo (professor, Sweden): for outstanding achievements in the field of archeology and paleogenetics.[3]

2015[edit]

  • Leonid Veniaminovich Keldysh: for outstanding contributions to the physics of tunnel phenomena, including the tunnel effects in semiconductors.
  • Paul Corkum (professor, Canada): for outstanding contribution in ultrafast physics, including attosecond range, and interferometry processes of electron wave functions in atoms and molecules with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

See also[edit]