Long Eaton School

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The Long Eaton School
Long Eaton School.jpg
Motto Opening Doors To The Future
Established 1910
Type Academy
Headteacher Mr Andrew Hunt
Chair of Governors Mr Mark Shearing
Location Thoresby Road
Derbyshire
NG10 3NP
England
Coordinates: 52°53′28″N 1°16′55″W / 52.891°N 1.282°W / 52.891; -1.282
Local authority Derbyshire
Students 1,280
Gender Mixed
Ages 11–18
Houses Calke, Chatsworth, Hardwick, Sudbury
Website www.longeaton.derbyshire.sch.uk

The Long Eaton School is a secondary Academy on Thoresby Road in Long Eaton located between Nottingham and Derby.

History[edit]

The former "LEGS" Grammar School building still stands in 2008

The £14,900 school opened on October 29, 1910 as the Long Eaton Higher Elementary School and Pupil Teachers' Centre on Tamworth Road.[1] The first headmaster was Samuel Clegg. The school was created for Clegg on the recommendation of Prof. Michael Sadler (who was to go on and found universities).[1] In 1913, the school became known as Long Eaton County Secondary School. In 1916, school dinners were introduced, with most of the vegetables being grown on site. In 1918, school leaving age is raised from 12 to 14.

In 1945, it became the Long Eaton Grammar School. In 1972, it merged with the nearby Roper Secondary Modern School, built in 1964, to become a comprehensive school. In 1989, it was renamed the Long Eaton Community School, to return to being known as The Long Eaton School in 1999.

New site[edit]

The footbridge over the canal built for the school.

On February 14, 2006, the former building which had been the grammar school on Tamworth Road (B6540), close to Long Eaton's centre, was closed. Part of the old buildings were demolished for housing. That part was previously used for years 10-11(ages 15–16) and also the Sixth Form. A brand new £15m school was built, under PFI funding by Babcock & Brown, adjacent to the former Roper School site, on the other side of the Erewash Canal. The new school is accessible via a footbridge over the canal. The former buildings of the Roper School were demolished. The new school is surrounded by a large security fence. It was built under the same PFI contract as Newbold Community School in Chesterfield.

It is a specialist science college, with an Eco status.[2] The school recently had a new building built in 2005 and was visited by Gordon Brown on November 10, 2006 for the official opening.[3] In September 2007, the school had to close for two days due to a water contamination of Legionnaire's disease.[4]

Recent successes[edit]

The school achieves above average results GCSE[citation needed], and broadly average results at A level[citation needed]. It has around 1,300 pupils. Ofsted inspections in 2006 and 2009 both judged the school to be Outstanding, and a Best Practice visit in 2009 focussed on the use of assessment in English. Subsequent inspections in 2012 and 2015 both judged the school to be Good.

Recent visitors to the school have included Hilary Benn MP, Ellie Simmons, Fergal Keane, Frank Gardner, Professor Alexander Martynov (Russian space scientist), Tristram Hunt MP and Andy Haldane (Chief Economist at the Bank of England). The school now has links with partners in Italy, France, Spain, Poland, Germany, UAE, Cuba, China, Czech Republic, Canada and the USA.

Academy status[edit]

The school consulted on conversion to Academy status as an Outstanding school, under the provisions of the Academies Act 2010, in the autumn of 2010. Although the process was made more complex by the school's PFI arrangements, conversion took place in April 2011. The Academy does not have a sponsor, and has retained the name The Long Eaton School.

In 2016 the school was approved as an Academy sponsor, and created a multi-Academy Trust operating under the name The Northworthy Trust.

Observatory[edit]

Building on its specialism in Science, the school has developed expertise in Astronomy, and now offers the subject at a GCSE as well as through evening community and "family learning" events. It is part of two national programmes - Leading Space Education and Astroschools. In July 2011 work began on building The Malcolm Parry Observatory, a project funded partly by The Wolfson Foundation, which was opened in 2012.

Former teachers[edit]

  • Charles Bungay Fawcett, leading British geographer, professor of Geography at the universities of Leeds and London.[5]
  • Mr F.L. Attenborough[6] - joined in 1913. Married Samuel Clegg's (the headmaster) daughter Mary. Their children would be Lord Attenborough, Sir David Attenborough, and John Attenborough. Samuel Clegg remained headmaster until he died in 1930. Richard Attenborough used to reside at Bothe Hall just over a mile down the road in Sawley, on Tamworth Road. Mr R Vasey, a former head teacher, left in the year 2008.

Notable students (as Grammar School)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b History of former grammar school, accessed 12 November 2008
  2. ^ Eco award in July 2007
  3. ^ Gordon Brown opens school in November 2006
  4. ^ Bacteria in September 2007, accessed 12 November 2008
  5. ^ Hugh Clout, "Fawcett, Charles Bungay (1883–1952)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, September 2011 accessed 2 Jan 2016
  6. ^ Attenborough, Frederick Levi’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2007; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 15 Nov 2008
  7. ^ ‘Boyes, Kate Emily Tyrrell, (Mrs C. W. Sanders)’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 15 Nov 2008
  8. ^ Campbell, Susan Catherine’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 15 Nov 2008
  9. ^ ‘Clegg, Sir Alec (Alexander Bradshaw Clegg)’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2007; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 15 Nov 2008
  10. ^ Hobday, Sir Gordon (Ivan)’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 15 Nov 2008
  11. ^ Lefebvre, Prof. Arthur Henry, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2007; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 15 Nov 2008
  12. ^ MATTHEWMAN, His Honour Keith’, Who's Who 2008, A & C Black, 2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 15 Nov 2008

External links[edit]