The Mahdi

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The Mahdi
TheMahdi.jpg
First US edition
Author Philip Nicholson,
writing as A. J. Quinnell
Country United States
Language English
Genre Thriller
Publisher Macmillan (UK)
William Morrow & Co (US)
Publication date
1981 (UK)
1982 (US)
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
Pages 397 pgs (Hardcover)
ISBN 0688006469
OCLC 9736123

The Mahdi is a 1981 thriller novel by Philip Nicholson, writing as A. J. Quinnell.[1][2] The book was published in 1981 by Macmillan in the UK then in January 1982 by William Morrow & Co in the US and deals with political power struggles over a presumed Muslim prophet.[3][4]

Synopsis[edit]

The Mahdi follows several characters as they attempt to find a way to negate the threat of Muslim fundamentalism to the Western World's oil supply. Pritchard, a slick triple agent, has been tapped to help solve the problem. He proposes that they find the Mahdi, a prophet that has been prophesied to follow Muhammad, and attempt to control him, as control over the Mahdi would give them control over the Muslim world.

Reception[edit]

Reception to The Mahdi was mixed,[5] with many reviewers criticizing the book's implausibility.[6] The New York Times gave The Mahdi an overall positive review, calling the plot "elegant" while stating that the lack of a defined villain makes it seem as if there were "less at stake here than there ought to be".[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Simon, Reeva (1989). The Middle East in Crime Fiction: Mysteries, Spy Novels and Thrillers from 1916 to the 1980s. Lilian Barber Pr. pp. 61, 64. ISBN 0936508205. 
  2. ^ WILLIAMS, NICK B (Dec 27, 1981). "Bloody Sunday". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  3. ^ Simon, Reeva (2010). Spies and Holy Wars: The Middle East in 20th-Century Crime Fiction. University of Texas Press. p. 49. ISBN 0292723008. 
  4. ^ Labib, Tahar (2007). Imagining the Arab other. I. B. Tauris. pp. 261–273. ISBN 1845113845. 
  5. ^ "Review: The Mahdi". Kirkus Reviews. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  6. ^ BROYARD, ANATOLE (January 30, 1982). "Books of The Times; No Escape". New York Times. Retrieved 4 November 2012. 
  7. ^ Jakab, Elizabeth. "FOREIGN AFFAIRS". New York Times. Retrieved 4 November 2012.